Friday, Oct. 4

Unite the District at Audi Field: If neighborhood festivals are a little too sprawling for your tastes, head to the home of D.C. United this weekend for a selection of some of the best eats and drinks that the area has to offer. A wide swath of the city will be represented, including Audi Field neighbors the Salt Line, Chloe and Bardo Brewing, as well as other great eateries, including 14th Street’s Chicken + Whiskey and Union Market’s Stellina Pizzeria. It won’t just be D.C.’s dining scene on display: Local bands Black Alley (Friday) and White Ford Bronco (Saturday) perform, along with a DJ set from Domo on both nights. Through Saturday. $20-$35.

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‘Robin Bell, Refractions’ at Lost Origins Gallery: D.C. artist Robin Bell is best known for his guerrilla projections of political statements on major D.C. landmarks. But for his next display, Bell is going indoors at Mount Pleasant’s intimate Lost Origins Gallery. “Refractions” still features Bell’s usual array of lights and projections, tailor-made for the location, but for the first time, there will also be printed pictures of Bell’s iconic works. 7 to 10 p.m. Weekends through Oct. 27. Free.

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Autumn Evenings at the Hirshhorn: The Hirshhorn knows that the best time for outdoor museum events is not the summer but the fall — even if the weather has not been sympathetic to autumn-admirers. The modern art museum extends hours until 8:30 p.m. this Friday and next to highlight their outstanding latest exhibits. This week’s focus will be the outstanding “Manifesto: Art x Agency,” which runs through January and features more than 100 artist manifestos created over the past 100 years. 5 to 8:30 p.m. Free.

‘Fleabag’ at the Shakespeare Theatre Company: Did you just finish binge-watching “Fleabag” after it won multiple Emmys, including best comedy series? Fans new and old will have a chance to catch a theatrical screening of Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s one-woman stage show, which earned rave reviews in London and New York City — and inspired the popular TV series. Tickets for the earlier 7:30 p.m. show are already sold out, so snag them while they last. 9:30 p.m. Sunday: 2 and 4:30 p.m. $20.

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Oktoberfest events at various locations: Now that the calendar has flipped to October, Oktoberfest celebrations really kick into gear. The Fort Belvoir Oktoberfest, which runs through Sunday, features a carnival midway on the base’s parade field with games, a Ferris wheel and other rides; a beer garden; German and American food and drink; and live German music. It’s open to the public (IDs required) Friday from 4 to 11. Red Bear Brewing, meanwhile, marks its first three-day “OktoBEARfest” with the release of three German-style beers — a märzen, a hefeweizen and a dry-hopped pilsner — and Friday’s opening night brings a special edition of the drag competition Slay Them, beginning at 9 p.m.

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Science of Speech at the Fillmore Silver Spring: Jay-Z once rapped, “If skills sold, truth be told, I’d probably be lyrically Talib Kweli.” That backhanded compliment has, in a way, defined the Brooklyn MC’s two-decade-plus career as a flame carrier for so-called lyrical or conscious hip-hop. While mostly out of the mainstream for as long as he’s been rapping, the style will be on display as part of the well-titled “Science of Speech” tour. Alongside Kweli, the bill includes Yonkers veteran Styles P, outspoken political duo Dead Prez and rap’s leading recluse, Jay Electronica, for a concert where lyrical skill will be the coin of the realm. 8 p.m. $35.

Meute at the Lincoln Memorial: Meute is a German marching band that plays arrangements of popular techno songs on traditional marching band instruments. There’s really nothing more to their gimmick than that, except they’re so tight — check out their versions of Disclosure and Eliza Doolittle’s “You & Me (Flume Remix),” which has more than 24 million views on YouTube, or Trentemøller’s “Miss You.” The group performs at the Lincoln Memorial at noon Friday at an event arranged by the German Embassy as a way to celebrate German Unity Day (Oct. 3) and German-American Friendship Day (Oct. 6). Noon. Free.

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Imani Winds at Gildenhorn Recital Hall of the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center: For more than two decades, Imani Winds, founded by the composer and flutist Valerie Coleman, has been unfolding different perspectives in its concerts, juxtaposing Bach with John Coltrane, playing Stravinsky and Jason Moran, riding a lonely path as one of the few ensembles made up of musicians of color in a very white field. “A Woman’s Perspective” is the title of Imani Winds’s program at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center on Friday. It features pieces by composers you should have heard of — including Ruth Crawford Seeger, a major voice of American modernism who after her marriage saw her work fall into neglect, and Coleman herself. 8 p.m. $10-$25.

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Saturday, Oct. 5

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Bring the Funk: A Natural Wine Party at Colony Club: Aiming to demystify the often confusing world of natural wine, D.C. wine distributors Plant Wines and Native Selections and retailer Domestique have joined forces for an afternoon of sipping in the spacious courtyard behind Colony Club, Sonny’s and No Kisses. Expect to learn what makes a wine “natural” or “minimalist” while tasting 15 samples from producers hailing from Europe and the Americas. (Colony Club’s Max Zimmerman says attendees will also get to enjoy a larger pour or two of their favorites at the end.) Beyond what’s in the souvenir tasting glass, look for snacks ranging from popcorn to charcuterie, and a DJ spinning funk and old-school tunes to keep the party from feeling like the usual wine tasting. 1 to 5 p.m. $40.

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Oktoberfest events at various locations: In addition to the continuing festivities at Fort Belvoir and Red Bear (see Friday listings above), there’s more German spirit to be found throughout the area. The Vienna Oktoberfest, which can draw more than 20,000 people, offers a beer garden, multiple music stages, a German auto show, and market with local makers on historic Church Street. The fun runs from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., and admission is free. Rustico’s Oktoberfest, held on the patio of its Alexandria location from noon to 5 p.m., features seasonal beers both local (Port City) and from Germany (including Ayinger and Rothaus), as well as German-style food. And at Wunder Garten in NoMa, which is winding down its extended Oktoberfest celebrations this weekend, the day starts early with a screening of the Bayern Munich-Hoffenheim match at 9 a.m., then there’s live music (noon to 4 p.m.), a “Bavarian Olympics” with stein-holding competitions from 4 to 7, followed by a DJ until close.

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Art on the Avenue in Alexandria: On the first Saturday of October, thousands of locals descend upon the Alexandria community of Del Ray to explore and celebrate the world of art. The diverse selection of 300 artists with works for sale includes the expected potters, woodworkers and photographers, but also silversmiths and sculptors. An array of neighborhood restaurants set up street service for the day, such as Del Ray Pizzeria and Evening Star Cafe — while visiting vendors set up shop in a food court field. As you stroll along the avenue, live music plays across four stages throughout the day. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Free.

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Prince George’s Fall Fest at Bowie Town Center: This annual celebration fills Bowie Town Center with vendors, free wine tastings, games and, more importantly, a pair of stages where a dozen local blues, funk and R&B bands perform throughout the day. It’s not a surprise that music is the focus: The festival is organized by the same group that arranges Bowie’s free summerlong concert series, and proceeds from the event benefit a charity that supplies instruments to students. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Free.

Pop-up pumpkin patch at Ballston Quarter: If you can’t make it out to a nice, scenic farm to pick up your pumpkin, head toward Ballston for your gourd fix. For $5 (cash only), you can snag a pumpkin and decorate it at the recently renovated Arlington mall. There will be live music and refreshments served throughout the day, but it’s also a great excuse to check out the food hall that opened in the basement, which features spots such as Hot Lola’s and Sloppy Mama’s. Or for those without little ones to worry about, the massive Punch Bowl Social is worth a look for post-pumpkin picking drinks and games. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free admission.

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Taciturn at Songbyrd: If you descend into the rowhouse basement where the members of Taciturn regularly jam new songs into existence and ask them how they do it, the D.C. noise-punk trio will instinctively jam toward a collective answer. “It’s meditative,” bassist-singer Natasha Janfaza says. “A song can be really chaotic, but it’s still meditative.” So the idea is to sink into the depths of your own head until everyone merges into some kind of rock-and-roll group mind? Maybe something like that. “We’re each beating paths, and then something just works,” drummer Kevin Ralph says. “You have to lose yourself in the intricacies of it.” 9 p.m. $8.

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Sunday, Oct. 6

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Takoma Park Street Festival: The Takoma Park Street Festival is almost four decades old, and few large street festivals capture the spirit of a community as well. The half-mile of Carroll Avenue between the D.C. line and East-West Highway is filled with a quirky mix of hundreds of booths run by artists, gardeners, crafters, yoga studios, all-natural apothecaries, the Masons and the Boy Scouts. Reggae, blues and Afrobeat bands play from three stages all day. Kids can get their faces painted, make arts and crafts, and jump on bouncy castles while adults participating in “The Crawl” can duck into restaurants and bars, filling their eco-conscious reusable mugs with craft beer, wine, green tea or horchata. Vegan restaurants, art galleries and vintage stores are open. It’s Takoma Park, ramped up to “10,” and it’s not to be missed. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free; “The Crawl” mug is $10.

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D.C. Craft Bartenders Guild Tiki Competition and Pig Roast at Archipelago: Yes, summer is over, and many drinkers’ thoughts are turning to mulled wine or hard cider. But the D.C. Craft Bartenders Guild’s annual throwdown is an excuse to put on that Hawaiian-print shirt or sailor’s cap one more time. Eight bartenders from some of the city’s best cocktail bars, including Quill, a Rake’s Progress and Bourbon Steak, are whipping up tiki-inspired cocktails and punches while chef Adam Greenberg of Coconut Club serves up a whole roast pig. Admission includes unlimited food and drink, and the best-dress guest wins tickets to December’s Repeal Day Ball. Noon to 5 p.m. $60.

Oktoberfest events at various locations: This is the final day for Oktoberfests at Fort Belvoir, Red Bear Brewing, Dacha Beer Garden and Wunder Garten. The NoMa beer garden has branded Sunday “Dogtoberfest,” complete with a canine costume contest (2 p.m.) and live music and DJs from noon to 11 p.m.

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Steve Lacy at 9:30 Club: For music obsessives who still comb liner notes, Steve Lacy is increasingly a name behind the scenes of the most significant songs and albums in R&B, rap and pop. The 21-year-old Compton, Calif., native started making beats on his iPhone and eventually hooked up with the Internet, the neo-neo-soulsters that spun off from Odd Future. He’s since collaborated with Kendrick Lamar, Solange, Vampire Weekend and Kali Uchis, among others, before striking out on his own with this year’s “Apollo XXI,” a genre-agnostic exploration of what he can do when left to his own devices. 7 p.m. Sold out.

-- Hau Chu, Fritz Hahn, Chris Kelly, Anne Midgette and Chris Richards

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