Monday, Oct. 7

‘Portraits of Courage’ at the Kennedy Center: The Kennedy Center certainly made some kind of statement when selecting former president George W. Bush’s portraits as its opening exhibit at the Reach expansion. The show includes 66 oil paintings of military veterans, each accompanied by brief stories of each person’s service. Timed tickets are available, though it’s also possible to drop in and pick up tickets the same day. Reserved tickets are not available Oct. 30. Tours will be available every day except on Sundays. Through Nov. 15. Free.

Tuesday, Oct. 8

Snallygaster Sightings: The Washington area’s most-anticipated beer festival takes place Saturday, and to create even more anticipation around it, the Neighborhood Restaurant Group is hosting a week-long series of mini-tap takeovers around town, with rare offerings and brewers that rarely bring their beers to the District. A couple of highlights: goses and sour ales (and the odd pilsner) from Arizona Wilderness and the Rare Barrel at the Partisan (Tuesday); Brettanomyces-forward wild and sour ales from Crooked Stave, Cascade, and Wolves and People at the Sovereign (Wednesday); dank IPAs and sour ales from Burley Oak at the Red Apron at Union Market (Thursday); and, on the night before Snally, a hop-forward night with Bissell Brothers, Tired Hands, the Veil and Cloudwater at ChurchKey (Friday). Beer at all of these events is limited, so early arrival is suggested. Times and locations vary.

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Wednesday, Oct. 9

Words & Pictures at Penn Social: You probably have a hefty list of books you want to read, but are any of the titles on that list a graphic novel? If not, let three of the most notable names in the form talk about the role and power of the graphic novel, and maybe persuade you to pick one up. Maryland-native Ebony Flowers, MacArthur fellow Gene Luen Yang and “La Borinqueña” creator Edgardo Miranda-Rodriguez will be in conversation with cartoonist Scott McCloud, who’s best known for his trilogy of nonfiction books dissecting comics as an art form. 7 to 8:30 p.m. $15.

P-Lo at Songbyrd: In Bay Area parlance, P-Lo’s music slaps. The co-founder and chief producer of East Bay rap collective the HBK Gang is one of the architects, alongside collaborators Iamsu and Sage the Gemini, of a cottage industry of post-hyphy party music. The crew’s sound has lit up functions on the West Coast and beyond, and has cropped up in songs by YG and Kehlani. As a solo artist, P-Lo’s thick bass lines, skeleton drums and back-to-basics lyrics animate his new album “Shine,” an acronym for “SomeHow It Never Ends.” When P-Lo is on the boards or on the mic, the party never does. 8 p.m. $16-$18.

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Thursday, Oct. 10

Rachel Bloom at the Anthem: Since the CW’s “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend” ended its four-season run in April, fans have been wondering what star and co-creator Rachel Bloom would do next. So has she: Bloom is on her “What Am I Going to Do With My Life Now?” tour, which may or may not spell out her career path. It will showcase new stand-up material and some of the acclaimed songs she wrote for the musical comedy series, which was beloved for how it tackled mental illness. We do know one thing that’s for sure in Bloom’s (and her husband’s) future: a baby. 8 p.m. $39.50-$75.

Fall for the Book at George Mason University: George Mason University’s three-day book festival always brings a wide and interesting array of authors and speakers to the Fairfax campus. Highlights include New York Times reporter Mike Isaac talking about his new book, “Super Pumped: The Battle for Uber,” Thursday at noon and authors Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (“We Should All Be Feminists”) and R.O. Kwon (“The Incendiaries”) discussing their works Friday. Nearly all events are free and do not require tickets, but capacity is limited. Through Saturday. Most events are free.

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Helena Hauff at U Street Music Hall: When it came time to name her most recent album, Helena Hauff played with the duality of the title “Qualm” — not just the English meaning, but the word in her native German tongue (pronounced “kvalm”) that means “smoke” or “fumes.” The DJ-producer makes metal machine music that is heavy on both unease and the ethereal, with drum machine skitters and synthesizer squelches that recall underground dance music from the 1980s. On the album, she tried “to create something powerful without using too many instruments and layers,” according to a news release, and her DJ sets also use the minimal for maximum effect. 11 p.m. $10-$25.

Shaed at 9:30 Club: Shaed’s rise to the top was a marathon rather than a sprint. After the Maryland electro-pop trio released its sleek breakout single “Trampoline” in June 2018, it took a full rotation around the sun before the song bounced to No. 1 on Billboard’s Alternative Songs chart and entered the Hot 100 chart this summer. These achievements were followed by appearances on morning and late-night talk shows that further launched it into orbit. Now, just seven months after selling out U Street Music Hall, Shaed returns to the District as a fully realized pop act headlining its biggest hometown gig yet at the 9:30 Club. 7 p.m. Sold out.

Friday, Oct. 11

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Fall Wine Festival at Mount Vernon: Fall is wine harvest season, but if you prefer to spend more time exploring regional wines than sitting in the car on the way to a vineyard, you might want to choose a wine festival over a wine tour. Case in point: the Fall Wine Festival at Mount Vernon. Now in its 23rd year, the three-day event hosts 19 wineries from around the commonwealth, each of which brings four to six different wines. (That’s a lot of tasting to be done.) The evening also includes live music, a picnic (food costs extra), and tours of Mount Vernon and the wine cellar, plus a meet-and-greet with George and Martha Washington. 6 to 9 p.m. through Sunday. $42-$48.

Yardfest at Howard University: Howard University celebrates its homecoming this weekend, which means clubs and bars are going to be packed with students, alumni and curious onlookers who want to bask in the aura that surrounds the festivities. The centerpiece, musically, is Yardfest, a free concert on the campus’s main quad. Over the years, it has featured surprise appearances by Drake, Jay-Z, Kanye West and the Notorious B.I.G., and it has gained a reputation for showcasing up-and-coming hip-hop artists; last year’s featured acts were A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie, Lil Baby and Gunna, with Slick Rick appealing to the older alumni. While the lineup isn’t announced until the last minute, attendance at Yardfest is usually a gamble worth taking. Noon. Free.

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‘The Price Is Right Live’ at MGM National Harbor: If you think you’d be pretty good at Plinko, put your money where your mouth is when “The Price Is Right Live” makes a stop for multiple shows at the Theater at MGM National Harbor. The traveling version (which does not include TV host Drew Carey) of the long-running daytime game show will invite D.C.-area residents to “come on down” and test their consumer smarts to win prizes and cash. Registration for competitors takes place at the venue starting three hours before showtime. Through Sunday. $35-$60.

Silver Branch Oktoberfest Weekend: Munich’s Oktoberfest ended Sunday, but Washington-area Oktoberfests keep going. Silver Spring’s Silver Branch Brewing, known for its continental-style lagers and ales, launches its first Oktoberfest with a three-day celebration that, at various times, will include the tapping of its Silver Branch Märzen beer, live music, German-style food, stein-holding contests, best-dressed contests and family activities on its courtyard patio. Admission is free, though the brewery also offers a $50 “passport” that includes three liters of beer, a one-liter commemorative mug and an enamel pin. 11 a.m. to midnight. Free admission.

Bedouine at Songbyrd: Good music should transport you, so it’s fitting that a faithful interpreter of this theory is Azniv Korkejian, who fashions songs as Bedouine. You could look at Korkejian’s nomadic life and find the inspiration for the name — she was born to Armenian parents in Syria, spent her childhood in Saudi Arabia and immigrated to the United States — but instead tune your ears toward the missives in her latest album, “Bird Songs of a Killjoy,” and join her on a journey. Korkejian’s songs are folk-inspired (the timbre of her voice can also evoke Brazilian bossa nova troubadours) and radiate a calming warmth that sends you closer toward bliss. 8 p.m. $15-$17.

— Hau Chu, Fritz Hahn, Adele Chapin, Chris Kelly and Stephanie Williams

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