Friday, Oct. 18

29Rooms at D.C. Armory: The creators of the digital media juggernaut Refinery29 have concocted a pop-up exhibition that makes you feel as if you’re stepping inside the mind of an artist, “Being John Malkovich”-style. Each of 29Rooms’ imaginative installations offer widely different interactive and visual experiences. There’s “The Art Park,” composed of playful designs from five regional and national artists (including D.C.’s Trap Bob) and an “Alice in Wonderland”-esque installation called “Dream Doorways” from R&B/pop star and Alexandria native Kali Uchis. Sprinkled into the art menagerie is a “Dance Break” room and a space called “29 Questions,” where brave visitors are encouraged to sit and chat up a stranger. Through Oct. 27. $10-$34.

Boo at the Zoo at the National Zoo: The popular Halloween destination for kids and families to get their candy and exotic animal fix opens this weekend. A ticket gets you a trick-or-treat bag, after-hours access to various animal exhibits and the chance to participate in activities such as a dance party and children’s karaoke. While the giant panda exhibit won’t be open for costumed visitors, the consolation prize will be a chance to meet “Count Pandula.” Through Sunday. 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. $30 (Saturday is sold out).

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Mystery Science Theater 3000 Live: The Great Cheesy Movie Circus Tour at National Theatre: Joel Hodgson is donning the red jumpsuit for the last time. He started playing Joel Robinson in 1988, “just another face” — per the old “Mystery Science Theater 3000” theme song — who did a good job cleaning up the place, but his bosses didn’t like him, so they shot him into space. In space, a.k.a. cable television, Hodgson survived a barrage of cheesy movies by “riffing” on them mercilessly with two robot friends, and a new art form was born. This weekend, Hodgson, 59, will sport the red jumpsuit for the first time since 1993 and bring a live version of the MST3K format familiar to fans: making fun of bad movies — in this case, the British schlockfest “Circus of Horrors” (1960) and the 1986 kung fu flick “No Retreat, No Surrender” — interspersed with sketches. Friday at 7 p.m. and Saturday at 3 and 8 p.m. $59-$99.

Night Witch at Union Market: Halloween may be two weeks away, but Halloween-themed events are already creeping onto our calendars. Night Witch, a cocktail pop-up taking over Union Market’s Suburbia trail through Sunday, is a collaboration between Suburbia founder Gina Chersevani; Quill bartender Sophie Szych; Quill sommelier Katie Dandridge; and pastry chef Zoe Ezrailson, a veteran of Mirabelle and Rose’s Luxury. Together, they’ve come up with a list of drinks inspired by powerful women, including the Sophia (a frozen, creamsicle-inspired Aperol Spritz served with a mini-bottle of Chandon) and the Beyoncé (Cotton and Reed rum with a mix of Chai tea, green tea and maple-syrup limeade). Should you come in costume? How else would you dress to enjoy a frozen Dolly Parton cocktail? Through Sunday. Free admission. Drink prices vary.

Grand reopening of Public Bar Live: The massive Dupont Circle sports bar has undergone renovations to transform it into live music venue, and while it has been quietly open for a hot second, the official grand reopening festivities kick off this weekend. Friday starts with a City Paper-sponsored panel discussion on the history of go-go at 4 p.m., followed by five local artists taking the stage at 8 p.m. For those missing the old Public Bar, there will still be football and hockey games shown all weekend on the TVs lining the walls. Times vary through Sunday. Open daily. No cover charge.

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Astrolab First Anniversary Celebration: Silver Spring’s home of hazy IPAs marks one year on Georgia Avenue with a two-day celebration. Each day at the brewery has new reasons to go: Friday includes the release of three canned beers, starting at noon, and a saison aged in gin barrels. Saturday sees five new releases, spread between noon and 5 p.m.; tastings of beer-inspired ice cream (1 p.m.) and New Zealand pies (2 p.m.) and ends with live music from 7 p.m. to close. Open Friday and Saturday at noon. Free admission; beer prices vary.

Saturday, Oct. 19

Loudoun Fall Farm Tour: Loudoun County is the fastest-growing jurisdiction in Virginia and as the highest median income in the United States. It’s easy to forget that, outside the Dulles-to-Leesburg corridor, much of the county is full of working farms. Twice each year, the county’s farms, stores, museums and parks open their doors to the public for weekend-long self-guided driving tours. In addition to tasting artisan cheeses from George’s Mill Farm in Lovettsville, going on hayrides at Wegmeyer Farms in Hamilton or picking pumpkins at Virts in Purcellville, tours also include farms that raise sheep and alpacas for wool, farm breweries and wineries, and facilities that train Olympic-level dressage competitors. Through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free.

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Open house at the Kreeger Museum: The Kreeger Museum is one of Washington’s hidden gems, a gorgeous modernist building by Philip Johnson that’s filled with famous impressionists (Claude Monet, Edgar Degas) and works by famous Washington artists (Gene Davis, Sam Gilliam) and surrounded by more than five acres of sculpture gardens. The Kreeger drops its usual admission fees this weekend for its family-friendly open house, which includes hands-on art activities for children; jazz by the Shannon Gunn Quartet; and a djembe drum circle. Food trucks will sell lunches on-site, and picnics in the sculpture garden are encouraged. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Free.

Down in the Reeds at the Parks at Walter Reed: Joining the long list of homegrown D.C. festivals is Down in the Reeds, a day-long event filled with live music performances and workshops helmed by industry experts. Situated at the campus of the former Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, now the site of the Parks at Walter Reed development, regional acts including smooth R&B crooner Aaron Abernathy, prog rockers Dove Lady and Afrobeat collective Crank Lukongo drive the music lineup. Also a part of the festivities is a “community healers tent,” outdoor games, pumpkin carving and arts and crafts. Plus, if you’re hungry during the day, Down in the Reeds will have plenty of food trucks and an Atlas Brew Works beer garden. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. $10 suggested donation.

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Raheem DeVaughn at City Winery: “If I stopped recording now and said I wouldn’t record for five years, I’ve got enough music for 10,” Raheem DeVaughn said earlier this year. “So I can’t wait, because I’m just warming up.” True to his word, the self-described Love King of R&B followed last year’s “Decade of a Love King” with June’s “The Love Reunion.” As he had throughout his years-long career, the D.C.-raised artist explores the intricacies of romantic entanglements in his silky smooth singing voice. While firmly rooted in R&B classicism, a few new songs add Caribbean grooves to spice things up. 7 and 10:30 p.m. Sold out.

Swervedriver at Rock and Roll Hotel: Emerging in the early ’90s from the same Thames Valley region that spawned its fair share of shoegazers, Swervedriver was often looped into the ethereal genre, even though the Oxford act brought more muscle and heft to its alt-rock tunes than its peers. The band bowed out in 1998 but reemerged a few years ago, just as shoegaze acts My Bloody Valentine, Jesus and Mary Chain, and Slowdive were getting back into the game. The pigeonholing has continued, but the two albums Swervedriver has released since reuniting are a reminder that the band did things its way. 9 p.m. $22.50-$25.

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Lakota Music Project at the National Museum of the American Indian and the Center for Contemporary Political Art: Musicians from the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation and the South Dakota Symphony Orchestra make beautiful music together as the Lakota Music Project, a collaboration that showcases native music, nonnative music and new commissions. In between two shows at Washington National Cathedral, the group will perform two free shows on Saturday highlighting music inspired by the Native American experience. 2 and 7:30 p.m. Free.

Sunday, Oct. 20

New Kitchens on the Block Vol. 6 at Mess Hall: In the world of restaurant journalism, it’s not unusual for food lovers to read about a star chef’s new restaurant months (or sometimes a year) before it opens. They may know where it will be located or have an idea about the concept, but no inkling of what the food will actually taste like. That’s where New Kitchens on the Block comes in. The semi-regular pop-up event at Mess Hall allows chefs to offer tastes of forthcoming restaurants a few dishes at a time. The latest edition includes early looks at Pearl’s Bagels, coming to Mount Vernon Square this fall; Maialino Mare, the “Roman-style trattoria” opening at the Navy Yard this winter from New York restaurateur Danny Meyer; and Red Apron Butcher founder Nate Anda’s Hi/Fi Taco, scheduled to open in the food hall-ish the Roost concept on Capitol Hill in 2020. Tickets include two hours of food, beer and cocktails. Noon to 2 p.m. and 3 to 5 p.m. $85-$135.

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Rumpus Room Family Dance Party at the Black Cat: The city’s hippest family dance party, with music curated by DJs known for spinning at Eighteenth Street Lounge and the Rock and Roll Hotel, returns for a special Halloween edition. Get the kids dressed up in costume and let them run around, play with bubbles, wiggle to pop songs and shake maracas. Meanwhile, parents can socialize and mingle — the bar will be open. 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. $12-$15.

Bad Moves at Comet Ping Pong: When they’re not getting animated in Cartoon Network’s “Craig of the Creek,” the members of Bad Moves can be found dissecting contemporary pop music as they sharpen their power-pop songcraft. While they utilize a typical guitars-bass-drums lineup, the four members share the microphone, from song to song and lyric to lyric. Their style has forced them to turn individual inspiration into songs that speak to universal experiences. 9 p.m. $12.

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Victor Dvoskin at Tabard Inn: Victor Dvoskin has been a professional bassist for more than 50 years, and for nearly half that time — in what is probably the longest running jazz gig in Washington — he has spent Sunday night tucked into a wood-paneled corner of the Tabard Inn, alongside another musician, playing a procession of tunes, some familiar and many that are not. Dvoskin, 71, is an elfish man with an intense mien, especially during his frequent acoustic bass solos, when the sounds spill off his fingers and roll through the air, one complex harmonic passage after another. 7 to 9:30 p.m. Free.

— Hau Chu, Fritz Hahn, Adele Chapin, T.R. Goldman, Tim Grieving, Chris Kelly and Stephanie Williams

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