Friday, Oct. 25

Washington Nationals World Series watch parties: For the first time since 1933, Washington has a team in the World Series. The. World. Series. Baseball fans are excited, and bars around the city are ready with viewing parties and happy hours — even the bars where, just a few months ago, you had to plead with the bartender to change the channel to a Nationals game. If you want to get close to the energy of the ballpark when the Nationals bring the series home on Friday, head toward Walters Sports Bar across N Street from Nationals Park. It’s become a popular destination with baseball fans, and not just because of the wall of self-service beer taps. Specials during games include discounted buckets of wings, Bud Light and Truly seltzer. Times vary.

AD
AD

Sleater-Kinney at the Anthem: Pioneering Washington state indie-rock band Sleater-Kinney has resumed the band’s 2015 reunion with one major change: Drummer Janet Weiss left the group after recording Sleater-Kinney’s ninth album, “The Center Won’t Hold,” which dropped in August. Founding singers/guitarists Corin Tucker and Carrie Brownstein are carrying on without Weiss to tour behind the record, which was produced by Annie Clark (a.k.a. St. Vincent) — a dream union for fans of both acts. Clark’s influence is all over “The Center Won’t Hold,” which sounds bigger and sleeker than 2015’s reunion record “No Cities to Love” but still maintains the political angst and punk energy of the band’s early output. 8 p.m. $37.50.

Night of the Living Zoo at the National Zoo: Kids got all dressed up to trick or treat at the National Zoo’s annual family-friendly Halloween extravaganza, Boo at the Zoo, last weekend. This weekend, it’s the grown-ups’ turn to party in costume. The adults-only Night of the Living Zoo event offers access to animal houses and exhibits after-hours, along with such fun and spooky extras as food trucks, a costume contest, roving performing artists, a D.J. and beer from craft breweries (the price of admission includes two drink tickets). 7 to 10:30 p.m. $30-$90.

Hilloween at Eastern Market: There are events for children all over the Washington area as Halloween approaches, and it’s tough to pick a favorite. But Hilloween gets our vote — it’s been a staple of the Eastern Market community for more than two decades, and this year’s celebration includes “multiple moonbounces” inside the market’s North Hall, face painters, a “haunted Circulator” and, of course, trick-or-treating. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Free.

AD
AD

The Make-Up at Black Cat: Like a manic street preacher spreading the punk gospel, Ian Svenonius is a heady frontman when he’s performing with his band the Make-Up. He unleashes otherworldly howls and wails, barreling into the crowd or rolling on the floor as if he’s experiencing an exorcism onstage. Svenonius’s fiery showmanship was partly behind the band’s initial success in the mid-’90s. With an original lineup that consisted of Svenonius, James Canty, Steve Gamboa and Michelle Mae, the post-punk quartet oozed soul, with a hypnotic organ and funky bass lines. And over two decades since its formation, the Make-Up’s untethered live show is still unlike anything in the D.C. punk scene right now. 8 p.m. $20-$22.

BalletX at the Kennedy Center: The adventurous Philadelphia company BalletX once danced through the halls of Union Market to the music of indie band Beirut. Now the contemporary ballet troupe will make its Kennedy Center debut as part of former New York City Ballet principal dancer Damian Woetzel’s “Demo” series. Robert Fairchild, another NYCB alum, will join BalletX for this special program, with music from Kate Davis and Catalyst Quartet. Through Saturday. 7:30 p.m. $55-$65.

Wylder at the Soundry: Wylder singer-guitarist Will McCarry is the first to admit that he’s the driving force behind the band’s ethereal indie-rock sound. “Wylder has been an exercise in the three of [my bandmates] indulging my sensibilities,” McCarry says. “The choices that we made on [new album] ‘Golden Age Thinking’ are informed by the kind of record that I’ve had in my head for a long time.” That album, released in July, is full of lush strings, nervous energy and big harmonies, while also shedding some of the more traditional folk influences from the band’s 2016 debut, “Rain and Laura.” 8 p.m. $10-$15.

AD
AD

Costumes and Cocktails at Suns Cinema: A creative costume is a must for a party thrown by Washington’s most idiosyncratic art house cinema. Head to the first-floor bar to sip horror movie-themed cocktails and listen to creepy music while clips and images from classic films are screened on the walls. (The featured film in the upstairs theater, “Midsommar,” is sold out.) 9 p.m. Free admission.

Saturday, Oct. 26

The Outwin 2019: American Portraiture Today at the National Portrait Gallery: Every three years, the National Portrait Gallery selects one artist for the honor of creating a portrait for its collection. That honor, which also comes with a $25,000 prize, is part of a contest named after the late Virginia Outwin Boochever, a museum volunteer and benefactor whose financial gift fosters the acquisition of contemporary portraiture. Works by this year’s 46 finalists go on view in the Outwin 2019 — the less formal name for the Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition — and include, along with such well-known artists as Shimon Attie, several Washington-area artists, including Larry W. Cook Jr., Joshua Cogan, Nekisha Durrett, Sheldon Scott and Louie Palu. Winners, including second- and third-prize awardees, will be announced this fall, with a People’s Choice winner to be chosen later, based on popular vote. Through Aug. 30. Free.

AD
AD

Kids Euro Festival at various venues: The 12th annual Kids Euro Festival is a classic only-in-Washington event: Take your little ones to see an interactive German theater group at Strathmore, or have the whole family participate in an arts-and-crafts workshop at the Swedish Embassy’s House of Sweden. Preteens can attend a Tintin cartooning workshop at the Embassy of Belgium, or see new animated films at the French Embassy. Events are held at locations across the region, including the Kennedy Center and public libraries, but it’s the immersive events at embassies that really open children to new worlds of fun, travel and, though you might not want to mention it, learning. Through Nov. 10. Free, but some events require reservations.

Silver Spring Zombie Walk: On the Saturday before Halloween, downtown Silver Spring transforms into an eerie scene that’s one part “Shaun of the Dead,” one part “Thriller” and a pinch of “Night of the Living Dead,” with participants shuffling and lurching down Georgia Avenue toward the AFI Silver Theatre. The annual Zombie Walk, which began as a neighborhood meetup at the Quarry House Tavern in 2008, has grown to include thousands of zombies dressed up in costumes ranging from comical and topical to truly frightening, and everyone is invited to participate, no matter how elaborate (or not) their costume. The action kicks off with happy hour at Denizens Brewing at 6 p.m., and the actual “walk” starts three hours later, with a 10:30 p.m. screening of “The Living Dead at Manchester Morgue” as the final destination. 9 p.m. Free.

Alessia Cara at the Anthem: Alessia Cara co-wrote all the music on her 2015 debut album, “Know-It-All,” but the result felt hollow and stilted. That’s not to say that Cara’s songwriting was disingenuous — at points, she unfurls some youthful wisdom about letting go of juvenile insecurities, such as on the opening song, “Seventeen.” But any profound lyricism seemed constrained by “Know-It-All’s” robotic and formulaic sound. Three years later, Cara dialed things back a bit for “The Pains of Growing,” allowing more breathing room for prophetic life lessons thanks to a looser, R&B- and pop-fused production. “Know-It-All” was meant to be Cara’s grand entrance, but it was “The Pains of Growing” that turned out to be Cara’s real introduction to the world. 7:30 p.m. $40-$75.

AD
AD

Evil Live: A Night of Misfits Cover Bands at Jackie Lee’s: The legendary New Jersey band the Misfits forged the “horror punk” genre in the 1980s, thanks to songs like “Astro Zombies” and “I Turned Into a Martian,” which took inspiration from schlocky sci-fi and horror films. It’s only appropriate that some of D.C.’s best punk musicians, including members of Darkest Hour, Loud Boyz and Supreme Commander will join forces to perform as three different Misfits cover bands on this pre-Halloween weekend. Prepare for a weird and loud time, complete with costume contest, at the cozy Jackie Lee’s in Brightwood Park. 9 p.m. Free.

Sunday, Oct. 27

Bone Yards at Yards Park: Not in the mood to piece together a topical costume for Halloween, but have a closet full of get-ups for Fido? Head down to Yards Park on Sunday for a puppy costume party. There will be all sorts of spooky seasonal activities, including crafts and face painting for those standing on two legs, and doggy trick-or-treating and a fashion show to flaunt your pup’s oh-so-clever whistleblower costume. 2 to 4 p.m. Free.

AD
AD

Pumpkin Fest at Wunder Garten: There’s really nothing like the new urban pastime of combining alcohol and pumpkin carving. Head to the NoMa beer garden on Sunday for one of your last chances to stab into a gourd this Halloween season. A $25 ticket gets you your own pumpkin and the supplies needed to carve and decorate it — and a portion of the proceeds benefits Habitat for Humanity of Washington D.C. 2 to 5 p.m. $25.

“Stirring the Waters Across America” at the Reach at the Kennedy Center: “Much of what’s going on in the nation is because we’ve willfully, woefully forgotten lessons from the civil rights movement,” D.C. composer Nolan Williams Jr. says. “It’s when parents see their children making the same mistakes they made, and it’s like, ‘Listen. I’m trying to warn you. The end of that is not going to be good.’ ” Williams — who’s in his late 40s, though he identifies as “forever 29” — doesn’t have children. Yet that quasi-parental observation is at the heart of his new work “Stirring the Waters Across America,” a theatrical concert production that examines the key moments of the civil rights era from 1954 to 1968. Williams, one of six recipients of the Kennedy Center’s inaugural Social Practice Residencies, will premiere the work on Sunday at the Reach. 2 p.m. Free.

— Hau Chu, Fritz Hahn, Adele Chapin, Rudi Greenberg, Michael O’Sullivan, Michael J. West and Stephanie Williams

AD
AD