Monday, Oct. 28

See Bei Bei while you can at the National Zoo: For the past four years, giant panda cub Bei Bei has been the star attraction at the National Zoo. But on Nov. 19, he’ll follow in the paw prints of older siblings Tai Shan and Bao Bao and move to a panda breeding program in China. The zoo announced a week of celebrations before Bei Bei’s departure, but if you’d like to say goodbye without larger-than-normal crowds, it might be better to visit now. The giant pandas receive enrichment items at their outdoor enclosure every day at 1:30 p.m. Daily through Nov. 18. Free.

I Put A Spell on You at the Folger Shakespeare Library: Witches have been associated with Halloween since the beginning, but the Folger’s celebration wants to go beyond the usual black cats and broomsticks. Poets Kiki Petrosino (author of the acclaimed “Witch Wife”) and Annie Finch (“The Poetry Witch: Little Book of Spells”) read poems about witchcraft, magic and the natural world. The Folger’s curators are assembling a special display of books about witches from the library’s collection for the night. So don’t be surprised to see a few weird sisters. 7:30 p.m. $15.

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Tuesday, Oct. 29

High heel race on 17th Street NW: A D.C. institution for more than 30 years returns to the streets near Dupont Circle. Since 1986, every Tuesday before Halloween has been marked by D.C. residents putting on their finest heels and racing on foot for all of 0.1 miles. If you’re not able to get on the appropriate gear, you can park yourself on one of the sidewalks or restaurants along 17th Street NW for a great view of the action. The race begins at 9 p.m. but competitors and onlookers come as early as 6 p.m. to take in the sights. Race at 9 p.m. Free.

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Spektral Quartet at the Kennedy Center: During Spektral Quartet’s program “Looking Skyward,” presented by Washington Performing Arts, a world premiere from cutting-edge Icelandic composer Anna Thorvaldsdottir will follow a piece by Beethoven. That’s par for the course for this Grammy-nominated Chicago string quartet, which explores the connections between classical masterworks and music written more recently. This Kennedy Center performance by the group will include a selection from 16th-century Spanish composer Tomás Luis de Victoria and Thorvaldsdottir’s “Enigma,” which is inspired by a solar eclipse and set to video art by Sigurdur Gudjonsson. 7:30 p.m. $40.

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Day of the Dead Festival at Oyamel: Oyamel’s annual Day of the Dead festival takes inspiration from a different artist on its ofrenda each year. This year’s honoree is singer Ritchie Valens and the city of Veracruz, where the folk song “La Bamba” was born. While Tuesday night’s five-course dinner has sold out, guests can still order a la carte from the Dia de los Muertos menu, offered through Nov. 3. Specialties include arroz a la tumbada, with pan-seared calamari, striped bass and head-on prawns served on a bed of rice; and tacos de berenjena, okra and eggplant tacos with a smoky salsa macha. Chase them with La Bamba: a blend of tequila, rum, pineapple, orgeat and lime. Through Sunday. Prices vary.

Wednesday, Oct. 30

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Jay Som at Rock & Roll Hotel: Melina Mae Duterte, who records as Jay Som, had largely created music within her own solitary ecosystem, recording most of her work in her bedroom. But for her fourth record, “Anak Ko,” Duterte let some friends in on the recording process, including Vagabon’s Laetitia Tamko, Chastity Belt’s Annie Truscott and a full band. The collaborative effort spawned nine songs that seem to blossom in real time — in the case of “Devotion,” a feather-light, jazzy melody unravels into a dreamy haze of vocals. On “If You Want It,” a jangly guitar morphs into a psychedelic swirl of sound. It’s clear Duterte is still very much in control on “Anak Ko,” but her guest collaborators bring newfound depth to her expansive sound. 8 p.m. $18.

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Superfine Art Fair at Union Market: Get a gallery wall started at Superfine, which returns to Union Market’s Dock 5 space after drawing 4,000 art lovers to last year’s inaugural event. Pieces start at $100 at this multiday art fair meant to appeal to younger collectors who want to meet and mingle with up-and-coming artists. Performance art, DJs, cocktails and a Halloween party make this a draw even if you don’t take any pieces home. Various times through Nov. 3. $15-$125.

J.S. Ondara at Sixth & I: Originally from Kenya, J.S. Ondara moved to the United States in 2013, when he was 20 years old, to make it as a musician. His experiences as an immigrant living in the United States are documented on his debut album, “Tales of America,” on which his angelic voice soars above his steadfast roots ‘n’ rock instrumentation. Ondara croons about his lofty plans of coming to this country, and reveals the pain that came with this move. “Well, everybody there told me/ This girl she ain’t good for your health/ She ain’t good for your health/ But I was head over heels,” he recounts on one of the record’s most heart-wrenching songs, “Television Girl.” 8 p.m. $20-$25.

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Revisiting ‘Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark’: A Night of Tales and Terror at the Crown & Crow: For almost four decades, preteens have been scaring themselves silly with the stories collected in “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark” and its two sequels. The recent film version has rekindled interest in the series, which will be celebrated on the night before Halloween at the Logan Circle pub Crown & Crow. Local actors, horror writers and volunteers will read choice selections from Alvin Schwartz’s books, while the party also features pumpkin decorating, costume contests and tarot readings. (Book a slot in advance for those.) 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. $13.13.

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Thursday, Oct. 31

Hall-O-Screen Party: ‘The Nightmare Before Christmas’ at the Reach: The Kennedy Center’s new expansion gets into the Halloween spirit with an outdoor alternative to trick-or-treating. It begins with dance instructors teaching the moves to “The Monster Mash,” “Thriller” and the decidedly not-family-friendly “Time Warp” from “The Rocky Horror Picture Show,” followed by an outdoor screening of Tim Burton’s “The Nightmare Before Christmas” on the Reach’s video wall. Bring a picnic or purchase something from food trucks and bar stations. Dance lessons from 6 to 7 p.m., film at 7:30 p.m. Free.

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Pumpkin-Carving Contest at Red Derby: For 12 years, the Red Derby has encouraged its regulars to carve pumpkins and drink beers and shots. Thank heaven for kid-safe carving tools, eh? This night of arts and crafts for adults finds talented artists creating intricate designs on their pumpkins, while others work on more rudimentary jack-o’-lanterns. The Derby provides pumpkins to the first 10 singles or groups, so you might want to bring your own gourd to ensure you get one. Important rules: No carving allowed before 7 p.m., and the judging begins promptly at 9, with bar tabs and other prizes up for grabs. 7 p.m. Free.

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Halloween at the Line Hotel: There’s a multimodal Halloween party going on at the Line Hotel in Adams Morgan: Local muralist Kasey O’Boyle leads a free, colorful pumpkin painting class for families on the hotel’s front steps from 4 to 6 p.m., with free cider and sweets, while all ages can trick-or-treat inside with Erik Bruner-Yang’s restaurant Brothers and Sisters. The final rooftop Camp at the Line party of the season, which runs from 7 to 11 p.m., features performances by the Gay/Bash queens, music and costume contests, all in support of the Whitman-Walker Clinic. Admission is $15 at the door and includes one drink. The night is capped with an immersive party at Brothers and Sisters and the hotel’s Full Service Radio studio, hosted by the BLCKNLIT podcast team, with themed snacks and drinks from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. While admission is free, capacity is limited, so early arrival is suggested. 4 p.m. to 1 a.m.

‘Thriller’ at the Smithsonian Castle: The best piece of trivia about the Smithsonian Castle is that it’s not just the original museum building: It’s also the final resting place of museum founder James Smithson. As such, it’s also rumored to be haunted. Learn more about Smithson and the ghosts who haunt the Mall’s Gothic/Romanesque edifice on a special Halloween tour, and then learn the choreography to the “Thriller” video in the Castle’s Great Hall. 5:30 p.m. Free.

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Friday, Nov. 1

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Bad Bunny at EagleBank Arena: After spending the past few years building buzz with loose singles and guest appearances — including a chart-topping one on Cardi B’s “I Like It” — Bad Bunny decided that 2019 would be his. So far, the king of Latin trap has delivered, surprise-releasing his debut album last Christmas Eve and a collaborative one with Colombian reggaeton star J Balvin. The 25-year-old Puerto Rican talent with the moody baritone provided an uber-contemporary spin on not just Latin trap but bachata, reggaeton, even pop-punk and synth-pop on his solo record, then provided a soundtrack for the summer with “Oasis” on his way to conquering the wide world of urbano. 8 p.m. $119-$149.

Angel Olsen at the Lincoln Theatre: When it came time for Angel Olsen to craft her fourth album, the Asheville, N.C.-based singer-songwriter intended to record the album twice — first, as bare-bones solo songs before rerecording with a full band. But once she heard how staggering the songs were when fully formed, Olsen knew only the second version would suffice. Whether augmented by orchestra or synthesizers, the songs of “All Mirrors” take the 32-year-old to dizzying heights. Quiet moments explode into widescreen epics as her lyrics grieve for broken hearts and celebrate mended ones. “This record is about owning up to your darkest side, finding the capacity for new love and trusting change even when you feel like a stranger,” Olsen says. Friday and Saturday at 6:30 p.m. $35; Friday sold out.

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The Sporkful’ live at the Miracle Theatre: You might have seen his face on Cooking Channel equipped with various food hacks or heard his voice on different NPR programs, but Dan Pashman is best known in food circles for his James Beard Award-winning podcast “The Sporkful.” Pashman talks with guests from the food and pop culture world and, fittingly for his D.C. show, he’ll host Kith and Kin chef Kwame Onwuachi at the Barracks Row theater. 6:30 p.m. $18.

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Nicole Byer at DC Improv: Comedian Nicole Byer is at her best when she’s being her silliest self, which is probably why “Nailed It!” — the Netflix show she hosts where bad home bakers compete in various challenges — has been such a hit. Equally adept at improv and stand-up, Byer hosts two podcasts: one about dating, “Why Won’t You Date Me?” and one about friendship, “Best Friends,” which she co-hosts with Sasheer Zamata. Byer will perform a string of sold-out shows all weekend. Through Sunday. Sold out.

— Hau Chu, Fritz Hahn, Adele Chapin, Rudi Greenberg, Chris Kelly and Stephanie Williams

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