Monday, Nov. 4

“Desolation Center” at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden: Ever wondered how modern music took root? “Desolation Center,” a documentary about a series of 1980s underground performances that blended performance art and live music, believes it has the answers. Director Stuart Swezey’s portrait of performances from prolific indie rockers including Sonic Youth and Minutemen was believed to have inspired festival behemoths such as Coachella and Burning Man. Swezey will be present for a Q&A following the screening. 6 to 8 p.m. Free.

Current Movements Film Festival at Eaton Hotel: The world may look a little scarier each day, but it seems like more and more people are banding together to try to stymie some of the problems we face. The downtown hotel will host a week-long festival inspired by social movements and will screen a new documentary each night that grapples with some of the issues that pose the biggest threats to the world, such as climate change. Through Saturday. $5-$30.

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Profs and Pints at the Bier Baron Tavern: If you caught “Harriet” in theaters this past weekend, you got a good dose of the bravery it took to coordinate the Underground Railroad. In the Oscar-winning “12 Years a Slave,” we saw its abhorrent opposite – the enslavement of free citizens. During this talk, University of Maryland history professor Rick Bell will discuss the history and tactics of the “Reverse Underground Railroad.” 6 p.m. $12-$15.

Tuesday, Nov. 5

Ami Dang at Rhizome: Ami Dang, an inventive sitar player and composer from Baltimore, recently phoned from Los Angeles, where she was preparing for a handful of gigs, one of them booked to take place outdoors in the golden California sunshine. Imagining Dang’s expansive, prismatic music unfolding in a vast, bright space wasn’t all that difficult — and it sparked two wide-open questions about her recent work: How does it get made? How does it get heard? Dang says that while recording her latest album, “Parted Plains,” she was forced to reverse-engineer her day job stress into a new creative strategy. “I was so energetically drained from this job,” she explains, “so I put some boundaries in place.” 7:30 p.m. $10.

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“Amadeus” at Folger Theatre: In Peter Shaffer’s classic play “Amadeus,” court composer Antonio Salieri is driven to the brink with jealousy by the musical genius of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and his everyday boorishness. Both the set — and soundtrack — of Folger Theatre’s production of “Amadeus” are bound to be sumptuous, as scenic designer Tony Cisek re-creates the salons and opera houses of 18th-century Vienna. Director Richard Clifford will bring this historically suspect yet highly entertaining tale of musical rivalry to life. Through Dec. 22. $27-$85.

The Outfit, TX at the Fillmore Silver Spring: While it doesn’t have the same standing on the rap landscape as Houston, Dallas has had a fertile, homegrown hip-hop scene for years now. Repping their city is the Outfit, TX, a duo that has been at it for 10 years and has been dropping underground favorites for the past few. Along with paying tribute to local landmarks with album titles “Fuel City” and “Little World,” Mel and Jayhawk make syrupy and sinister songs for strip clubs and drag races. And while the Big D looms large in their music, so do Houston and Memphis touchstones like UGK and Three 6 Mafia. 8 p.m. $25.

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Wednesday, Nov. 6

Grand opening at the Goethe-Institut Washington: The German cultural institute — and occasional home to such great one-off events as fire-dancing burlesque — is moving from its current location to one of the newest developments along 14th Street NW. The opening of the new location will kick off with a discussion about the transatlantic history of jazz and feature a live performance from a German American quartet. Other events throughout the day include sample German lessons, fairy tale movie screenings and a dance party to close the night. 3 p.m. Free.

“Godzilla” at the Freer Gallery: It was 65 years ago when the kaiju known as Godzilla emerged on the shores of Japan and changed the course of pop culture as we know it. Ishiro Honda’s monster classic spawned countless imitators and homages — the Godzilla series itself is considered the longest-running film franchise in history. The Freer Gallery will screen the 1954 film during a weekday matinee. 2 p.m. Free.

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Thursday, Nov. 7

Devon Welsh at Comet Ping Pong: After fronting Majical Cloudz for the first half of the decade, Devon Welsh abandoned the artsy electronic pop of that duo when launching his solo career in 2016. These days, the Canadian singer-songwriter prefers his quiet introspections unadorned by much. And after last year’s relatively spare “Dream Songs” he’s gone even more minimal with “True Love,” moving to rural Wisconsin and embracing meditation, therapy and solitude while recording the album in a basement studio. His newfound asceticism allowed him to ponder the many facets of love, from romantic to parental to platonic. 9 p.m. $15.

Anthony Pirog Quartet at the American Art Museum: One of the staples of the city’s experimental scene will take the stage at one of the more unique performance spaces. Guitarist Anthony Pirog will assemble a quartet of musicians to play in the American Art Museum’s Luce Foundation Center annex. Pirog is best known for his work with the Messthetics and in jazz and rock clubs around the city. There will be a bar set up with drinks and snacks for sale while you’re surrounded by priceless art. 5:30 p.m. Free.

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“Kaili Blues” at Suns Cinema: “Long Day’s Journey Into Night,” which featured a remarkable, nearly hour-long uninterrupted take in 3-D, captivated moviegoers earlier this year. If you wanted to see director Bi Gan’s 2015 debut, “Kaili Blues,” set your sights on the Mount Pleasant art house theater. The 30-year-old Chinese filmmaker set the vision for his style with “Kaili Blues” — which also features a 41-minute uninterrupted shot — a nonlinear, dream narrative that lets the viewer float along for the ride. 8 p.m. $10.

Friday, Nov. 8

Smithsonian Food History Weekend at the National Museum of American History: Julia Child’s kitchen will have some great company during this event, which brings star chefs and food entrepreneurs from across the country to the National Museum of American History. This year’s theme is “Power Through Food: Women Entrepreneurs Saving Communities.” Free events include lectures, book signings and cooking demos, such as a lesson on how to prepare a signature Eritrean dish and a presentation from Bad Saint restaurant co-owner Genevieve Villamora. Culinary heavy-hitters Jacques Pépin, Rick Bayless, Danny Meyer, Mary Sue Milliken, Susan Feniger and José Andrés also will speak at a panel moderated by Carla Hall. Various times through Saturday. Free (registration required for some events).

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Death Becomes Us at Lisner Auditorium: Brightest Young Things’ festival dedicated to the pop culture phenomenon of true crime is back this fall with two big names as headliners: Amanda Knox will interview Lorena Bobbitt, now known as Lorena Gallo, for a live recording of Knox’s podcast “The Truth About True Crime with Amanda Knox” (Sunday at 5:15 p.m.). Podcasters from “BuzzFeed Unsolved” are also on the schedule during the three-day festival’s run at Lisner Auditorium, along with a presentation by the FBI agents who solved the D.C. sniper case. Through Sunday. Various times. $25-$35.

— Hau Chu, Adele Chapin, Chris Kelly and Chris Richards

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