Friday, Nov. 8

Smithsonian Food History Weekend at the National Museum of American History: Julia Child’s kitchen will have some great company during this event, which brings star chefs and food entrepreneurs from across the country to the National Museum of American History. This year’s theme is “Power Through Food: Women Entrepreneurs Saving Communities.” Free events include lectures, book signings and cooking demos, such as a lesson on how to prepare a signature Eritrean dish and a presentation from Bad Saint restaurant co-owner Genevieve Villamora. Culinary heavy-hitters Jacques Pépin, Rick Bayless, Danny Meyer, Mary Sue Milliken, Susan Feniger and José Andrés also will speak at a panel moderated by Carla Hall. Various times through Saturday. Free (registration required for some events).

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Death Becomes Us at Lisner Auditorium: Brightest Young Things’ festival dedicated to the pop culture phenomenon of true crime is back this fall with two big names as headliners: Amanda Knox will interview Lorena Bobbitt, now known as Lorena Gallo, for a live recording of Knox’s podcast “The Truth About True Crime with Amanda Knox” (Sunday at 5:15 p.m.). Podcasters from “BuzzFeed Unsolved” are also on the schedule during the three-day festival’s run at Lisner Auditorium, along with a presentation by the FBI agents who solved the D.C. sniper case. Through Sunday. Various times. $25-$35.

The Emporiyum at Union Market: From hot sauce to doughnuts and oysters to cocktails, the annual Emporiyum is a food lover’s wonderland. Expect more than 90 vendors, including restaurants, start-ups and foodies with side hustles, to fill Union Market’s Dock 5 this weekend. There’s plenty to sample, though you’ll probably want to buy full-size cookies or lobster rolls if you want to fill up. It’s an interesting place to scout food trends, score an early holiday present for a bestie, and, of course, snap some like-generating Instagram photos. The event kicks off Friday night with a cocktail battle (6 to 8 p.m., $50), and access times and entry fees vary throughout the weekend. Through Sunday. $15-$80.

Andy Aylward at the Pocket at 7DrumCity: Here’s a little thought-bubble that can be as obvious or profound as you need it to be: We spend our entire lives preparing for the present moment. It’s an idea that quietly animates Andy Aylward’s “Sometimes Rain,” a debut album filled with erudite soft-rock songs, some of which the 28-year-old has been working on for eight years. “I enjoy having something I sat with for a long time,” Aylward says. “It represents years and years of living, and it’s always in my back pocket.” 7 p.m. $10.

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International Sherry Week: Sherry sometimes gets a bad rap, but the barrel-aged fortified Spanish wines being celebrated around the District this week are nothing like the sweet sherries your grandmother might have enjoyed. There are numerous chances to delve into sherry: Try pairings of sherry and small plates at Jaleo; explore Upshur Street, including Dos Mamis and Petworth Citizen’s Reading Room, to get passport stamps and earn prizes; or pick something off a special Sherry Cart roaming the dining room at Emilie’s. Through Sunday.

‘What to Send Up When It Goes Down’ at Woolly Mammoth Theatre: Even though the actors tell you that the rituals of “What to Send Up When It Goes Down” are primarily for black audience members, people of any color can — yes, I think, must — relate to the anguish flowing through this intense and edifying experience. Aleshea Harris’s performance piece, presided over by an accomplished and impassioned cast of eight, plunges all its patrons into a river of outrage. America in 2019 remains a den of inequity, insofar as insults to African American hearts and bodies are concerned. In “What to Send Up When It Goes Down,” the violence perpetrated against black people by police is the jumping-off point for an exercise that starts in a mournful cataloguing of those insults, passes through stages of anger — and ends, for some spectators, in tears. Through Sunday. $20-$40.

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Saturday, Nov. 9

International holiday bazaars at various locations: November is usually when some of us start thinking about shopping for holiday gifts. But forget Black Friday: The District’s international community has you covered with holiday markets and bazaars. The Czech Embassy opens its doors Saturday so shoppers can browse handblown glass ornaments and Bohemian jewelry while sipping mulled wine and listening to carols. The same day features the Danish Club of Washington’s annual Christmas Bazaar at St. Elizabeth’s Church in Rockville, sponsored by the Danish Embassy; the Icelandic Association of Washington’s Christmas Bazaar at American Legion Post 177 in Fairfax; and the Norwegian Christmas Bazaar at Emmanuel Lutheran Church in Bethesda. Books, knitwear, holiday decorations and baked goods are common, but each country puts its own spin on the festivities. Times vary. Free.

‘Marcel Duchamp: The Barbara and Aaron Levine Collection’ at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden: If your only exposure to the work of Marcel Duchamp is his upended urinal, then the Hirshhorn is ready to open a window into one of the most influential artists of the 20th century. The modern art museum’s latest exhibition, courtesy of D.C. collectors Barbara and Aaron Levine, is one part of a year-long showcase of the French artist who rejected the idea that art needs to be visually appealing. Duchamp’s crude urinal, “Fountain,” was one of a series of pieces of ready-mades he created that were everyday objects reinterpreted as art. A selection of those objects will be on view including “Hat Rack,” which suspends the household fixture on wire from the ceiling, and “Comb,” a simple steel comb dated to the hour of its creation. Through Oct. 12. Free.

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'Punk the Capital: Building a Sound Movement’ at AFI Silver: Countless punk bands have burned bright and fast across the D.C. landscape in the time it has taken the filmmakers of “Punk the Capital: Building a Sound Movement” to put the finishing touches on their music documentary. But fans can breathe easy knowing it was worth the wait. For anyone who wasn’t one of the Kickstarter donors who pledged a total of $50,121 in 2014 to see the completion of this love letter to the city’s punk scene — begun in earnest more than 15 years ago — the film takes viewers through the story of punk’s birth in the District (known for short-and-unsweetened paeans to defiance, the punk genre came to flourish in this capital city, becoming one of Washington’s greatest cultural exports). Showtimes through Monday. $8-$13.

Jake Xerxes Fussell at Jammin Java: Timelessness is a hard feeling to capture for any artist. That’s especially true for Jake Xerxes Fussell, whose knowledge and love of various eras of folksy American tunes appears to be encyclopedic, at minimum. The North Carolina-based troubadour’s own life seems as though it could have been plucked out of one of his own songs: Fussell grew up traveling with his folklorist father across the Southeast, which helped inspire him to do graduate research on Choctaw fiddlers. On Fussell’s latest album, “Out of Sight,” he shows off his reverence for the past with interpretations of tunes that are nearly a century old. But he also adds his flourishes on those staples and his original compositions by forgoing the aged twang of an acoustic guitar for the modern clarity of the electric. 7 p.m. $20.

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‘Over the Line’ release party at Jailbreak Brewing: Every year, Yakima Chief Hops invites brewers who served in the military — professionals and amateurs alike — to help create a special blend of hops from the Pacific Northwest. This “Veterans Blend” is then sold to breweries and home brewers across the country, with a portion of proceeds donated to a military-related charity. (This year, it’s the Wounded Warriors Family Support Fund.) Laurel’s Jailbreak Brewing used the 2019 Veterans Blend to create a special double IPA, dubbed Over the Line, and its debut serves as a fundraiser for Warrior Events, an Annapolis-based charity that offers events for veterans and Gold Star families, and will receive $1 from every pint and $2 per six-pack. 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Free admission.

Lil Tecca at the Fillmore Silver Spring: It’s not uncommon for teenagers to capture the ears of music fans of all ages, but it was still a little amusing to see that perhaps the only thing that shined brighter than Lil Tecca’s summer banger “Ransom” was the gleam of the braces wiring his teeth in the song’s music video. The 17-year-old rapper took to Instagram to blow up his song, which has now accumulated more than 170 million views on YouTube. Tecca worked with the producing duo Internet Money, whose beats launched the careers of Juice Wrld, among others, to fashion his infectious singsong flow. His debut album, “We Love You Tecca,” can be a little repetitive but flashes his potential. 8 p.m. Sold out.

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Sunday, Nov. 10

Julia Jacklin at Black Cat: Julia Jacklin is not trying to cloak her feelings. The Australian singer pens koans that confront the storm of feelings that swirl around what it takes to fall in and out of love with someone. What’s remarkable about the 29-year-old’s tunes is how she tackles these issues with lucidity, especially on her latest album, “Crushing.” Press play on “Don’t Know How to Keep Loving You” to hear Jacklin’s perspective not as a jilted partner, but as one who has gotten to the point in a relationship where being so intertwined feels as isolating as being alone. What resonates are Jacklin’s pleas to choose to balance love and anguish versus merely letting yourself dissolve and never feel anything at all. 7:30 p.m. $20.

Nate Bargatze at the Warner Theatre: Tennessee native Nate Bargatze is the kind of comedian who found fame through word of mouth. Lauded by such comedy luminaries as Jim Gaffigan, Jimmy Fallon and Marc Maron, Bargatze’s career didn’t really take off until his 2017 half-hour special for Netflix’s “The Standups,” which happened to be the first episode of the series. Buoyed, no doubt, by the streaming service’s autoplay feature, Bargatze’s laid-back PG-rated storytelling style connected with audiences. Earlier this year, he followed that special with the hour-long “Tennessee Kid.” 7 p.m. $33.

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Third anniversary bash at Cotton & Reed: It’s been three years since Cotton & Reed started producing flavorful rums in a warehouses across from Union Market. To celebrate the occasion, the distillery and bar is throwing a party with a release of rum that has been aged in bourbon and sherry barrels (limited to 100 bottles), as well as bringing back some old favorites from their cocktail list. 4 p.m. Free admission.

— Hau Chu, Fritz Hahn, Adele Chapin, Rudi Greenberg, Peter Marks and Chris Richards

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