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Those we have lost to the coronavirus in Virginia, Maryland and D.C.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: John-Sebastian Laird-Hammond, 59. (Franciscan Monastery of the Holy Land in America); Eastern Stewart Jr., 71. (Family photo); Susan Rokus. (Courtesy of Julie Ciardiello); George Valentine. (Office of Mayor Muriel Bowser) Sterling E. Matthews, 60. (Courtesy of Alice Matthews); Maria Linda Sun, 19. (Family photo); Terrance Burke at Laurel. (Preston Keres/The Washington Post)
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The number of known coronavirus cases in the District, Maryland and Virginia surpassed 87,000 on Friday. More than 3,700 people across the area have died of covid-19. Among the victims have been a teacher, a nurse, a school counselor and coach, a supermarket worker and a Franciscan friar. Here are their stories.

Has someone close to you died of covid-19? Tell The Washington Post. We’re reporting on the lives of the victims and the impact they had in their communities.

• • •
(Courtesy of the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum) (Tina Hager/George W. Bush Presidential Libr)

William Roosevelt Jerman, 91

Woodbridge, May 16

William Roosevelt Jerman, a longtime butler at the White House, was a man who left an impression. He had served presidents from Dwight D. Eisenhower to Barack Obama. “With his kindness and care, Wilson Jerman helped make the White House a home for decades of First Families, including ours,” Michelle Obama said after his death.

Read more about William Roosevelt Jerman

• • •
(Family photo)

Chantee Mack, 44

Silver Spring, May 11

Chantee Mack worked in the Prince George’s County Health Department’s sexually transmitted disease clinic, informing people of their test results. It was at work that her family believes she contracted covid-19. She was one of more than 100 clinical staff who the county deemed essential to assist with the county’s coronavirus response.

Read more about Chantee Mack

• • •
(Family photo)

Arlene Chesley, 78

Charles County, May 6

Arlene Chesley moved into Charles County Nursing and Rehabilitation — now Sagepoint Senior Living — in 1999. Doctors told her after a brain aneurysm and stroke that she would be lucky to live for five years. She lived another 21, years filled with bingo, music — Diana Ross and the Supremes were her favorite — and visits from her six grandchildren. Chesley died of covid-19 at Charles Regional Medical Center.

Read more about Arlene Chesley

• • •
(Family photo)

Jaimala ‘Mala’ Singh, 65

Lutherville, May 5

Growing up in India, Jaimala ‘Mala’ Singh designed saris and tapestries there, then moved for marriage to Baltimore in 1980, eventually becoming one of the country’s top-selling designers for Calico, a design-store chain. But to those who knew her well, Singh was most memorable as a whirlwind of caring — a charismatic, attentive mother, aunt, wife and friend in stylish Punjabi clothing who was always present if someone was hurting or in need.

Read more about Jaimala Singh

• • •
(Family photo)

Patricia Weissenborn, 100

Springfield, May 1

Patricia Weissenborn had spunk enough at age 19 to go to the courthouse in rural Montana in 1938 to change her name to match a movie star’s. In her 20s, she ditched her job teaching in a one-room schoolhouse and headed solo to Oregon, for office work at a shipyard gearing up for World War II. She insisted on driving into her 92nd year, outfoxing her daughter, who had purposely locked the keys in the car, by calling AAA and then hiding her Oldsmobile. She died at Greenspring retirement community, 10 days after being diagnosed with covid-19.

Read more about Patricia Weissenborn

• • •
(Family photo)

Ruth E. Shinn, 97

Potomac, May 1

Ruth E. Shinn was a nationally known advocate for gender, racial and LGBT justice who was known in her family for a childlike joy about things like sharks’ teeth, blooming mountain laurels and swimming. After she retired in 1995, younger people in her family associated her with hosting big, warm gatherings at her cottage on the Chesapeake Bay, blowing huge bubbles and swimming several times a week into her 90s.

Read more about Ruth Shinn

• • •
(Lena H. Sun)

Yu Lihua, 90

Gaithersburg, April 30

Yu Lihua was one of the most important Chinese American writers of her day. She published more than two dozen books, the fruit of a fascination — and obsession — with writing that spanned 75 years. The work guided her and her mostly Chinese-speaking readers through heartbreak, divorce, struggles over identity and belonging, and questions of sex, sexism, friendship and family. She pushed herself, and those she loved, with a mantra she held onto from a grade-school teacher who read one of her early stories: “You can make something of yourself.” She died of covid-19 in a suburban Maryland retirement complex.

Read more about Yu Lihua

• • •
(Yuletta Pringle)

Alyce Gullattee, 91

Washington, April 30

It was not unusual for Alyce Gullattee, a pioneering psychiatrist and devoted civil rights activist, to wander alone down alleys in Northwest Washington, at the height of the crack epidemic of the 1980s, searching for a patient she feared had overdosed. She would become one of the nation’s most respected experts on substance abuse in a career that spanned half a century at Howard University, where she spent a career serving as an associate professor of psychiatry and as director of the school’s Institute on Substance Abuse and Addiction. Before her death, Gullattee was the oldest faculty member at Howard.

Read more about Alyce Gullattee

• • •
(Family photo)

Gerald Slater, 86

Washington, April 24

In two decades as an executive at PBS and then WETA, Gerald Slater played a key role in the development of public television, expanding its coverage of public affairs and the arts. In 1974, during the Senate’s Watergate hearings, he took responsibility for offering up the hearings in prime time, shifting the system’s image. He died at Sibley Hospital.

Read more about Gerald Slater

• • •
(Courtesy of Bill Campbell)

Edna Adams, 105

Washington, April 21

Edna Adams defied expectations her entire life. Born in 1914, she lived to see the other side of the 1918 flu pandemic, women’s suffrage, the Great Depression and two world wars — all before she moved from her home in Clover, S.C., to the District in the mid-1950s, where worked for more than two decades as a sales associate at Jelleff’s, a department store in Northwest Washington, until it closed in 1979. She is the city’s oldest victim of the virus and one of the oldest nationwide.

Read more about Edna Adams

• • •
(Family photo)

Wogene Debele, 43

Takoma Park, April 21

Wogene Debele, who immigrated from Ethiopia with her family almost a decade ago, was eight months pregnant when she decided to return to Holy Cross Hospital a second time for “a checkup” in late March. It was the last time Debele’s husband and three children would have her in their midst. She also left behind a newborn son, who was born a month premature the day Debele was admitted to the hospital.

Read more about Wogene Debele

• • •
(Family photo)

William E. “Bill” Jackman, 85

Reston, April 21

Bill Jackman liked sports. He became a Washington Capitals season-ticket holder in 1974, the hockey team’s inaugural year, and had season tickets to the Washington Bullets, Baltimore Orioles and Washington Nationals at various points in his life, as well. Jackman, a retired press spokesman who loved to travel the world with his wife of 60 years, died this week in an assisted-living facility in Reston, Va., after testing positive for covid-19.

Read more about William Jackman

• • •

Calvin Richardson, 57

Maryland, April 19

Calvin Richardson worked at Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Washington, where he was an addiction therapist who ran substance abuse recovery groups and did case management. “He was always extremely warm and gentle. The veterans loved him,” a colleague said.

Read more about Calvin Richardson

• • •
(First American Bankshares, Inc.)

Jack W. Beddow, 98

Rockville, April 19

Jack Beddow was a retired top executive at First American Bankshares who helped guide what was once the largest financial institution in the Washington area as it became embroiled in the BCCI bank-fraud scandal of the 1980s. He served as president, chief executive and director of First American Bankshares for three years until his retirement in 1991. At the time, the $11 billion privately owned financial-holding company operated more than 250 branches.

Read more about Jack Beddow

• • •

Carla Thompson, 67

Washington, April 18

Carla Thompson, a patient at St. Elizabeths Hospital who was struck by covid-19, had no family she was in touch with to mark her passing, advocates said. She was undergoing treatment for leukemia and voluntarily living at the District-owned hospital, where she was civilly committed as an outpatient in 2016. She was the fifth of 10 patients to die amid a coronavirus outbreak at the city’s public psychiatric facility.

Read more about Carla Thompson

• • •
(Family photo)

Ruth Hunter, 96

Washington, April 17

Ruth Hunter came to the District in 1944 as a government girl — the young women who arrived to work for federal agencies during World War II, many of them from small towns like her birthplace, Apollo, Pa. She continued at the Pentagon after the war and lived the next eight decades in the District. She worked as a secretary for Gen. Omar Bradley while he chaired the Joint Chiefs of Staff during the Truman and Eisenhower administrations. She died

Read more about Ruth Hunter

• • •
(Courtesy of Florie Matondo)

Zoao Makumbi Sr., 75

Prince George’s County, April 16

Zoao Makumbi Sr. had his dream job as a psychologist at an elementary school in Northeast Washington. He told his family every year that he planned to retire, but the work, he believed, was too important. Makumbi’s winding path to becoming a school psychologist spanned two continents and five decades — from Congo to a General Motors factory in Michigan to Howard University to Houston Elementary in Ward 7. He died at Doctors Community Hospital in Prince George’s County.

Read more about Zoao Makumbi Sr.

• • •
(Family photo)

Celine Tracy, 91

Bethesda, April 15

Celine Tracy’s whole life was defined by her love of music. She began giving piano lessons to children in 1983 and continued doing so through her retirement in 1999. “She just was a fabulous pianist and believed fully that music would not only integrate your hands and your mind, but also your heart,” said her daughter Cynthia Tracy. “She was a true musician.”

Read more about Celine Tracy

• • •
(Carrie Kelly)

Lawrence, 69, and Minnette Nokes, 71

Carroll County, April 15 and April 7

Lawrence Nokes was admitted to Carroll Hospital Center on March 30 and intubated. After about a week in a coma, his prognosis improved, his family recalled. He started to breathe on his own. When he regained consciousness, Nokes asked for just one person: Minnette, his wife of 24 years.

Minnette Nokes had died days earlier, on April 7, a day before her 72nd birthday, of a heart attack. The medical examiner’s office said she posthumously tested positive for the coronavirus. Once Lawrence Nokes found out, his breathing grew raspy again. He died on April 15, eight days after his wife.

Read more about Lawrence and Minnette Nokes

• • •
(Courtesy of Donna Miller)

Michael Miller, 60

Temple Hills, April 15

Michael Miller was rarely spotted alone. In the nine years he worked at the Silver Spring bus depot, he was most often seen in “a crowd of fellas,” and on summer weekends he hosted barbecues at his Temple Hills home, playing ’70s music while grilling ribs. There was nothing that pleased Miller more, said his wife, Donna Miller, than seeing the people around him having a good time. He was the first Montgomery County government employee to lose to his life to the disease.

Read more about Michael Miller

• • •
(Courtesy of Landon School)

Bob Condit, 79

Vienna, April 13

Bob Condit was a true believer in community service. Not only did he personally try to help others whenever he could, he also instilled the value of service in thousands of students over a 35-year career at Landon School, an independent college preparatory school for boys in Bethesda.

Read more about Bob Condit

• • •
(Family photo)

Antoinette “Annette” Meyer, 95

Crownsville, April 13

Antoinette “Annette” Meyer was the first female deputy sheriff in Prince George’s County. She worked for the force from 1963 to 2000, when she retired at the age of 74. Even then, she could fire a 9mm pistol well enough to keep her sidearm. She died at the Fairfield Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Anne Arundel County.

Read more about Annette Meyer

• • •
(Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post)

Jerry Givens, 67

Richmond, April 13

Jerry Givens led the second-busiest execution team in the country for 17 years, presiding over 62 executions in Virginia before turning against capital punishment and becoming one of the country’s most prominent opponents of the death penalty. He organized protests, testified before lawmakers and met with the family members of incarcerated people and their victims, as well as with corrections officers whom he urged not to perform executions.

Read more about Jerry Givens

• • •
(Family photo)

Brian R. Miller, 52

Alexandria, April 13

Brian Miller overcame blindness, and a sometimes unaccommodating public education system, to get multiple degrees, including a PhD. That journey led him to a career with the U.S. Education Department’s Rehabilitation Services Administration, where he helped students with disabilities like his, and to a rich and busy life filled with friends and travel. Both were cut short on April 13 when Miller, who lived in Alexandria, Va., died of complications of covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. He was 52 and otherwise healthy, his mother said.

Read more about Brian Miller

• • •
(Courtesy of Elizabeth Weller, Deon Crowell’s attorney)

Deon M. Crowell, 51

Washington, April 13

Deon M. Crowell had been in the D.C. jail since 2018, when he was charged with first-degree murder in the stabbing death of a D.C. woman. His was the first in-custody death attributed to covid-19 at the facility. His attorney had petitioned a D.C. Superior Court judge to have her client released as he awaited trial, arguing that Crowell’s diabetes and other health challenges associated with the disease put him at greater risk of contracting the coronavirus.

Read more about Deon M. Crowell

• • •
(Courtesy of Santos-Gaffney family)

Theodore Gaffney, 92

Washington, April 12

Theodore Gaffney, a Washington freelance photographer, was asked by Jet magazine to travel with the Freedom Riders in the spring of 1961. He found himself risking his life and documenting one of the most tumultuous 48 hours in civil rights history. Gaffney would live six more decades and take many more pictures of presidents, and even Queen Elizabeth, according to his family. He died at George Washington University Hospital.

Read more about Theodore Gaffney

• • •
(Landon School)

Maclear “Mac” Jacoby Jr., 93

Gaithersburg, April 11

Maclear Jacoby Jr. led a life defined by service — first in the U.S. Navy during World War II and then fighting in Korea as a member of the Air Force. In 1955, Jacoby turned his attention to educating children. During a 65-year career at Bethesda’s Landon School — the longest in the school’s history — Jacoby served many roles, including two decades as a math teacher, head of the middle school and as a varsity tennis coach.

Read more about Maclear Jacoby Jr.

• • •
(Angelica Whiting)

Cynthia Whiting, 66

Charles County, April 11

Cynthia Whiting loved her only granddaughter so much that when the little girl pointed out places on a map that she wanted to go, Whiting would make it happen. “She spoiled her grand-baby rotten,” said her daughter, Angelica Whiting, 33. “Every time you saw my daughter, my mom was right there.” Now, Angelica Whiting is struggling to help 7-year-old Mackenzie understand that her grandmother is gone, and why she did not get to say goodbye.

Read more about Cynthia Whiting

• • •
(Courtesy of Jan Hirschfeld)

Steve Joltin, 75

Rockville, April 11

Steve Joltin, who spent his retirement years playing poker and hunting for undiscovered gems, tested positive for the novel coronavirus on April 10. His doctor told his wife, Barbara, that he still appeared healthy and was likely to make a full recovery. But the next day, just after midnight, she was awakened by a call from the nursing facility. Steve had died.

Read more about Steve Joltin

• • •
(Clement Britt/Richmond Times-Dispatch)

Gerald Glenn, 66

Chesterfield, April 11

Bishop Gerald Glenn was the founder and leader since 1995 of the New Deliverance Evangelistic Church in Chesterfield, Va. He died on the eve of Easter. Glenn was the first black chaplain of that community’s police department and was a police officer before becoming a pastor. “He was a friend and pillar of [the] Richmond faith community,” Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) tweeted following his death.

Read more about Rev. Gerald Glenn

• • •
(Family photo)

Curtis Orr, 55

Lanham, April 9

Curtis Orr, the youngest of 10 children, emigrated from Trinidad and Tobago to the United States when he was 25. Growing up impoverished with no indoor plumbing and no clothing or shoes of his own, Orr was determined to not only do well but to also be generous when he became successful. In late March, days before Orr started feeling weak, he went to the grocery store to stock up on food for his family. While there, he picked up cases of water to drop off at the homes of some elderly friends. He also made a stop to deliver a few masks to a friend, a front-line worker, who needed them for her family.

Read more about Curtis Orr

• • •
(Family photo)

Chianti Jackson Harpool, 51

Baltimore, April 8

Chianti Jackson Harpool moved easily from the streets of Baltimore, where she once worked as a social worker helping the homeless and drug-addicted, to a political fundraiser in the city on the arm of her husband, who owns a public relations and marketing firm. She spent a week at home waiting for test results, then was rushed to the hospital as her condition deteriorated. Before she died, Jackson Harpool told her husband that she was sorry. “What are you sorry about?” he recalled asking. “I didn’t know I was this sick,” she said.

Read more about Chianti Jackson Harpool

• • •
(Family photo)

Irwin Schorr, 89

Silver Spring, April 7

Irwin Schorr, retired IBM employee and bibliophile, always thought there was something more to learn. Two weeks before he died of covid-19, Schorr signed up for remote saxophone lessons from an unemployed musician in Baltimore.

Read more about Irwin Schorr

• • •
(Courtesy of Linda Flowers)

James N. Flowers Jr., 84

Fort Washington, April 6

Bishop James N. Flowers Jr. founded a house of worship in a vacant auto garage in 1982 and in 38 years built it into a handsome brick church with about 200 congregants in Seat Pleasant, Md. “My dad was just a special, humble, fair, caring man of God,” said his daughter, Linda Flowers. He was the lead singer of a band on the rise on the D.C. club circuit during the 1950s and 1960s.

Read more about James Flowers

• • •
(Courtesy of Michael Hyland)

Annis Creese, 73

Hyattsville, April 5

Annis Creese was in her final year of teaching Spanish at Northwestern High School in Hyattsville, Md. Nearly everyone who crossed paths with her could feel her warmth, which she projected so strongly some of the children she taught called her “Mom.” Creese left behind two grown children and the hundreds of students who passed through her classroom at the Prince George’s County school over her 25 years there.

Read more about Annis Creese

• • •
(Courtesy of Dave Bainum)

Peter Bainum, 82

Bethesda, April 3

Peter Bainum’s writings weren’t the sort you’d come across in your neighborhood bookstore. One of his volumes, for instance, is titled, “Orbital Mechanics and Formation Flying: A Digital Control Perspective.” But in the field of aerospace engineering, the former Howard University professor was “a star,” his son said.

Read more about Peter Bainum

• • •
Horace and Violet Saunders dancing in 2011, when they were both 88. (Courtesy of Saunders family)

Violet and Horace Saunders, 96

Mount Airy, April 2 and March 29

Horace Saunders was the mayor of every room he walked into — a gregarious chap for whom all life was a performance — while Violet, in her quiet, gracious style, “kept him in his place, kept him grounded,” their granddaughter recalled. If he was holding forth and got carried away, Vi, pleasantly exasperated, might roll her eyes. They died five days apart after catching the virus in Pleasant View Nursing Home, in Mount Airy, Md.

Read more about Violet and Horace Saunders

• • •
(Family photo)

Samuel Kramer, 91

Potomac, April 2

Samuel Kramer was a founding member of Congregation Har Shalom in Potomac and spent decades in government service. He worked at the Bureau of the Budget, which eventually became the Office of Management and Budget, and at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, from which he retired as deputy director in 1997. He died in the hospital on the morning he was scheduled to be discharged.

Read more about Samuel Kramer

• • •

Sean Boynes, 46

Bowie, April 2

Sean Boynes was a natural comedian and loving father who always knew when any of “his girls” — his daughters, his wife or his mother — needed a hug. He was born in Silver Spring, graduated from Gonzaga High School, graduated with three degrees from Howard University, and was a member of the Air Force before becoming a manager of a pharmacy, where he worked until the day he developed symptoms of covid-19.

Read more about Sean Boynes

• • •
(Lucian Perkins/The Washington Post)

David C. Driskell, 88

Hyattsville, April 1

David Driskell was an artist, art historian, art collector, art teacher, author and curator who became a primary sponsor and advocate for the role of African American art in the national culture. As an artist, Driskell was best known for a 1956 painting, “Behold Thy Son,” a graphic representation of the mutilated corpse of Emmett Till. He served on the art faculties of several historically black colleges but was best known for his affiliation with the University of Maryland from 1977 to 1998.

Read more about David Driskell

• • •
(Zenobia Shepherd)

Leilani Margurite Jordan, 27

Upper Marlboro, April 1

Leilani Margurite Jordan’s mother called her “Butterfly,” for her love of butterflies. She worked part time at a Giant supermarket in Largo and continued to work despite the spread of the coronavirus. Jordan’s mother, Zenobia Shepherd, tried to explain the risks of working. But she said Jordan, who had a disability that caused “cognitive delays,” impaired her vision and left her reliant on a service dog, probably did not fully understand the potential dangers of the coronavirus. And her daughter’s desire to help others, Shepherd said, was overpowering.

Read more about Leilani Jordan

• • •
(Courtesy of Kenneth J. Moore Jr.)

Kenneth J. Moore, 52

Prince George’s County, April 1

Kenneth J. Moore was a father figure wherever he went. By day, he helped counsel and guard teenagers who had been arrested in the District for the city’s Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services. On nights and weekends, he was a dad to his three sons, two stepchildren and many other youths he encountered as his children grew up in Prince George’s County.

Read more about Kenneth J. Moore

• • •
(Courtesy of Alice Matthews)

Sterling Matthews, 60

Chester, March 31

Sterling Matthews was a veteran of both the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Army. He was working in support services at Fort Belvoir when he became ill. He went to the hospital on March 23 to be tested for the coronavirus but was told he had pneumonia and sent home. The Chester, Va., resident returned four days later by ambulance and died four days after that at Bon Secours St. Francis Medical Center.

Read more about Sterling Matthews

• • •
(Courtesy of Nate Garland)

Jerry Manley, 58

Huntingtown, March 31

Jerry Manley was a retired police sergeant beloved for his generosity and wisecracking humor, a devoted volunteer for charities and a married father of four. “A gentle giant who’d give you the shirt off his back and not expect anything in return,” said his neighbor Kelly Brogan.

Read more about Jerry Manley

• • •
(Tracy Shavell)

Gary Holmberg, 77

Mount Airy, March 29

Gary Holmberg was a retired D.C. firefighter who loved sports, pranks and being outside. He grew up in the District and joined the D.C. National Guard after graduating from Anacostia High School. He served for 22 years as a firefighter, retiring in 1988 from Engine 15.

Read more about Gary Holmberg

• • •
(Family photo)

Chad Capule, 49

Cheverly, March 29

Chad Capule was an IT project manager. His family remembers him as a cheerful and inquisitive man who was known as a peacemaker. For eight years, he organized a trivia fundraiser for the Rotary Club of Dupont Circle, his wife said. He even appeared on one episode of “Jeopardy!” in 2015. He died at St. Agnes Hospital in Fond du Lac, Wis., where he had traveled in March to oversee the installation of a computer system at the hospital.

Read more about Chad Capule

• • •
(Family photo)

Eastern Stewart Jr., 71

Bowie, March 29

Eastern Stewart Jr., a military veteran, could manage a crowd and de-escalate conflict like no one else. He was the house manager at the Bowie Center for the Performing Arts and had worked for nearly a decade at the 800-seat Bowie performing arts center.

Read more about Eastern Stewart

• • •
(Preston Keres/The Washington Post)

Terrance Burke, 54

Hyattsville, March 27

Terrance Burke was a well-known school counselor and basketball coach at Northwestern High School in Hyattsville, Md. The Navy veteran had asthma but was physically fit and ate a healthy diet. His death came as a shock to his family.

Read more about Terrance Burke

• • •
(Family photo)

Noel Sinkiat, 64

Olney, March 27

Noel Sinkiat planned to retire in December after 41 years of working as a nurse at Howard University Hospital. He would finally go on a long motorcycle trip with his friends. He was the first member of National Nurses United, which represents about 150,000 health-care workers nationwide, to succumb to the virus, the union said.

Read more about Noel Sinkiat

• • •
(Family photo)

Maria Linda Villanueva Sun, 61

Newport News, March 25

Maria Linda Villanueva Sun was, at various times in her life, a restaurateur, interior designer, accountant, stay-at-home mom and Army wife. It was the last of these roles that brought the longtime San Francisco Bay area resident to Newport News, Va., where her husband had recently been transferred to Fort Eustis. The couple bought a house in October and were still in the process of moving some items from the West Coast when Sun died of covid-19.

Read more about Maria Linda Villanueva Sun

• • •
(Office of Mayor Muriel E. Bowser)

George Valentine, 66

Washington, March 27

George Valentine was a longtime lawyer in the D.C. Attorney General’s Office who later worked as a legal adviser to Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D). Those who worked with Valentine described him as a stellar attorney who knew the city and its laws. Valentine, who went on to Harvard Law School from a small historically black university in Alabama, dedicated a long career to public service and mentored young lawyers.

Read more about George Valentine

• • •
(Family photo)

Keith Redding, 59

Fort Washington, March 25

Keith Redding had an easy grin and good-natured sense of humor, according to his wife, Dana. They were both members of the Fort Foote Baptist Church motorcycle ministry in Fort Washington, Md.

Read more about Keith Redding

• • •
(Courtesy of Valerie Balser)

Susan Rokus, 73

Loudoun County, March 25

Susan Rokus, a Loudoun County Public Schools reading tutor, died of health complications related to the coronavirus. Rokus started as a first-grade teacher in 1969 and retired in 2014, staying on part time to tutor struggling readers at two elementary schools. She was the first known death in the county.

Read more about Susan Rokus

• • •
(Courtesy of Katharine Maddox)

Sterling “Ruffin” Maddox Jr., 78

Arlington, March 24

Sterling Maddox was a trained civil engineer. He was born and raised in Montgomery County and crossed the Potomac River only in the past decade to live close to his daughters and beloved grandsons in Northern Virginia. He served a brief stint in the Maryland Legislature five decades ago and later became a developer, helping establish neighborhoods in the region.

Read more about Sterling Maddox

• • •
(Franciscan Monastery of the Holy Land in America)

John-Sebastian Laird-Hammond, 59

Washington, March 20

John-Sebastian Laird-Hammond had been a member of Franciscan Monastery of the Holy Land in America since the late 1980s and had for the past 14 years run its day-to-day operations as business manager. He was the first person to die of the novel coronavirus in the District.

Read more about John-Sebastian Laird-Hammond

• • •

Read more:

U.S. map of the spread: Tracking cases and deaths by state and county

What you need to know about coronavirus

How you can help during the coronavirus outbreak

Why outbreaks like coronavirus spread exponentially, and how to ‘flatten the curve’

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