Mark

Mark

Few aging agitators are as unreconstructed as Walden Commune alumnus Mark Slackmeyer, and fewer still are as proud of it. Known as "Megaphone Mark" during his campus activist years, he was on the national organizing committee for the Vietnam Moritorium, and was interviewed after the massive anti-war demonstration by Dick Cavett. Adopting the on-air moniker "Marvelous Mark," Slackmeyer created a distinctive campus radio program that was influential during the Watergate period, though he was widely censured at the time for some of his editorial comments. After stints as a bricklayer, a computer operator, and a part-time bartender, Slackmeyer returned to broadcasting with a post at WBBY. Sensing there was nothing wrong in Nixon's America that wouldn't become even more deplorable in Reagan's, he chose to stay permanently and professionally mad, and went to work for National Public Radio. Activist folklore is the richer for it. Still making waves on air, he combines probing interviews with "Lite 'n' Easy Rock," for the generation that still gets down but can't catch up.

Mark is the only major FM disc jockey known to have outed himself on the air. He and his partner -- conservative commentator Chase Talbott III -- appeared together for years on NPR's "All Things Being Equal" until a bitter breakup ended their union.

Burying his permanently embittered and eternally critical father Phil, a former Reagan appointee, proved difficult, as none of Slackmeyer per's three trophy wives were able to attend, leaving Mark to hire high school kids in order to fill the church. His professional life remains vibrant: Although his offer of $10,000 to anyone able to personally corroborate that George W. Bush actually served with the National Guard in Alabama was never claimed, the contest was highly entertaining and noted by the journalistic community, as were his "Tom Delay Deathwatch"and an aggressive interview with anti-Semite and Berzerkistan ex-President-for-Life Trff Bmzklfrpz.