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This month, a group of major research universities published another groundbreaking study that established in stark detail the scope of sexual assault and misconduct on campuses and how students perceive the response to the problem.

In 2015, the Association of American Universities collected data from more than 150,000 students at 27 schools in a confidential online survey that was at the time the largest of its kind. This year the AAU heard from more than 180,000 students at 33 schools.

Overall, the latest findings confirm anew that a significant share of college students experience nonconsensual sexual contact — through touching or penetration — and sexually harassing behavior. Here is a link to coverage of the study. Below are tables summarizing the data from all participating schools.

First, this table examines troubling incidents that undergraduate women experienced since entering college, through force or inability to consent or stop what was happening. Listed are percentages that reported nonconsensual sexual touching, penetration and (a combined category) sexual contact.

University Nonconsensual sexual touching Nonconsensual penetration Nonconsensual sexual contact
Boston U. 17.8 11.1 23.7
Brown 18.1 11.6 24.5
Caltech 10.5 5.9 14.3
Carnegie Mellon 13.8 10.1 18.6
Case Western Reserve 18.5 10.4 23.6
Georgetown 24.5 15.0 31.6
Harvard 19.6 10.2 24.0
Iowa State 17.3 11.3 22.8
Johns Hopkins 17.4 11.1 23.7
MIT 14.1 8.1 18.4
Northwestern 17.5 11.6 22.6
Ohio State 19.0 12.4 24.9
Rice 12.9 8.2 17.7
Stanford 19.0 9.6 23.8
Texas A&M 19.6 14.1 27.0
U. of Arizona 17.9 12.2 23.8
U. of Chicago 16.1 10.4 21.8
U. of Florida 23.0 14.9 30.1
U. of Kansas 18.9 14.9 26.0
U. of Michigan 20.4 12.4 26.9
U. of Minnesota 19.1 12.7 25.6
U. of Missouri 19.2 13.7 26.6
U. of N. Carolina 21.5 15.9 29.5
U. of Oregon 14.7 10.7 20.8
U. of Pennsylvania 20.2 12.2 25.9
U. of Pittsburgh 20.2 13.4 26.9
U. of Rochester 17.3 9.7 22.3
U. of Southern Calif. 24.6 14.9 31.0
U. of Virginia 19.0 11.9 25.5
U. of Wisconsin 20.9 11.0 26.1
Vanderbilt 20.3 13.3 26.9
Washington in St. Louis 20.6 15.1 27.0
Yale 22.3 12.1 28.4
ALL 33 SCHOOLS 19.6 12.8 25.9

Second, this table examines the prevalence of the same nonconsensual sexual incidents among graduate or professional students who are women. Listed are percentages experiencing these incidents since enrolling.

University Nonconsensual sexual touching Nonconsensual penetration Nonconsensual sexual contact
Boston U. 5.7 2.5 7.4
Brown 6.8 4.5 9.5
Caltech 3.5 6.3 7.8
Carnegie Mellon 4.3 2.4 5.8
Case Western Reserve 5.5 3.8 8.3
Georgetown 4.7 3.0 6.9
Harvard 6.0 3.4 8.0
Iowa State 6.0 4.7 9.0
Johns Hopkins 4.3 2.8 6.4
MIT 6.0 3.3 8.3
Northwestern 3.6 2.3 4.9
Ohio State 9.9 6.8 13.3
Rice 3.2 2.2 5.2
Stanford 6.8 3.4 9.1
Texas A&M 12.6 9.1 17.6
U. of Arizona 9.5 8.2 14.2
U. of Chicago 4.9 3.5 7.0
U. of Florida 13.4 10.5 19.0
U. of Kansas 6.5 5.8 10.5
U. of Michigan 8.1 4.9 11.0
U. of Minnesota 6.0 3.6 8.2
U. of Missouri 9.1 6.9 12.4
U. of N. Carolina 8.1 6.5 12.1
U. of Oregon 6.9 5.2 9.8
U. of Pennsylvania 5.5 2.8 7.5
U. of Pittsburgh 7.7 5.1 10.8
U. of Rochester 4.9 3.5 7.4
U. of Southern Calif. 5.6 3.1 6.9
U. of Virginia 6.1 5.2 10.0
U. of Wisconsin 9.4 6.6 13.1
Vanderbilt 4.6 3.6 6.6
Washington in St. Louis 6.5 3.8 9.3
Yale 7.5 3.6 9.7
ALL 33 SCHOOLS 6.9 4.6 9.7

Third, this table shows the percentage of undergraduates who said it is very or extremely likely the university will take a report of sexual assault or other misconduct seriously.

University Women Men
Boston U. 47.0 68.2
Brown 57.0 77.1
Caltech 69.7 75.1
Carnegie Mellon 58.6 78.4
Case Western Reserve 62.3 80.6
Georgetown 35.8 59.8
Harvard 49.3 74.7
Iowa State 66.9 83.8
Johns Hopkins 31.6 57.2
MIT 68.4 84.2
Northwestern 50.0 71.7
Ohio State 55.6 74.8
Rice 70.4 80.9
Stanford 48.1 70.7
Texas A&M 55.4 79.6
U. of Arizona 54.8 70.1
U. of Chicago 49.6 66.4
U. of Florida 51.0 75.5
U. of Kansas 55.6 73.5
U. of Michigan 55.1 79.8
U. of Minnesota 50.6 74.1
U. of Missouri 56.1 74.5
U. of N. Carolina 33.1 57.2
U. of Oregon 59.0 71.6
U. of Pennsylvania 51.2 73.5
U. of Pittsburgh 55.2 72.2
U. of Rochester 53.9 69.2
U. of Southern Calif. 38.6 60.5
U. of Virginia 60.7 81.9
U. of Wisconsin 58.7 77.8
Vanderbilt 61.3 77.0
Washington in St. Louis 38.1 61.3
Yale 52.2 75.8
ALL 33 SCHOOLS 53.0 74.2

Finally, this table examines the number and share of students at each school who responded to the survey.

University Women Men All students
Boston U. 2,750 (16.0%) 1,157 (9.7%) 3,907 (13.4%)
Brown 1,911 (37.5%) 1,175 (25.0%) 3,086 (31.5%)
Caltech 397 (50.9%) 480 (34.5%) 877 (40.4%)
Carnegie Mellon 1,392 (25.9%) 1,356 (18.6%) 2,748 (21.7%)
Case Western Reserve 1,586 (29.0%) 977 (18.1%) 2,563 (23.6%)
Georgetown 3,812 (45.2%) 2,316 (31.7%) 6,128 (38.9%)
Harvard 4,765 (41.6%) 3,549 (30.7%) 8,314 (36.1%)
Iowa State 2,716 (19.5%) 2,114 (11.7%) 4,830 (15.1%)
Johns Hopkins 2,478 (31.9%) 1,606 (24.4%) 4,084 (28.4%)
MIT 2,097 (47.8%) 2,245 (34.1%) 4,342 (39.6%)
Northwestern 3,193 (30.1%) 2,205 (20.4%) 5,398 (25.2%)
Ohio State 4,771 (14.6%) 2,672 (8.4%) 7,443 (11.6%)
Rice 2,156 (75.6%) 2,375 (62.8%) 4,531 (68.4%)
Stanford 5,063 (68.2%) 5,035 (56.8%) 10,098 (62.0%)
Texas A&M 2,021 (7.9%) 1,119 (4.0%) 3,140 (5.9%)
U. of Arizona 3,202 (17.1%) 1,704 (10.4%) 4,906 (14.0%)
U. of Chicago 2,616 (37.5%) 2,290 (27.3%) 4,906 (31.9%)
U. of Florida 4,468 (15.6%) 2,093 (9.2%) 6,561 (12.8%)
U. of Kansas 2,642 (19.2%) 1,586 (13.3%) 4,228 (16.4%)
U. of Michigan 4,628 (21.2%) 2,708 (12.2%) 7,336 (16.7%)
U. of Minnesota 7,814 (32.9%) 5,019 (24.6%) 12,833 (29.1%)
U. of Missouri 3,720 (24.8%) 1,890 (15.2%) 5,610 (20.4%)
U. of N. Carolina 4,270 (25.4%) 1,726 (14.3%) 5,996 (20.8%)
U. of Oregon 2,368 (27.1%) 1,009 (9.5%) 3,377 (17.4%)
U. of Pennsylvania 6,342 (48.4%) 3,964 (36.1%) 10,306 (39.4%)
U. of Pittsburgh 3,221 (18.6%) 1,606 (10.7%) 4,827 (15.0%)
U. of Rochester 2,142 (35.4%) 1,455 (25.3%) 3,597 (30.5%)
U. of Southern Calif. 5,190 (23.9%) 3,191 (12.7%) 8,381 (17.9%)
U. of Virginia 4,498 (36.6%) 2,495 (23.3%) 6,993 (30.4%)
U. of Wisconsin 4,980 (25.0%) 2,717 (14.7%) 7,697 (20.0%)
Vanderbilt 2,595 (38.7%) 1,423 (25.9%) 4,018 (32.9%)
Washington in St. Louis 1,412 (18.4%) 957 (14.0%) 2,369 (16.4%)
Yale 3,596 (50.4%) 2,726 (40.2%) 6,322 (45.4%)
ALL 33 SCHOOLS 110,812 (26.1%) 70,940 (17.5%) 181,752 (21.9%)

Below are a few reactions from university leaders.

Georgetown University: “Student awareness of the University’s policies and supportive resources has increased significantly over the last three years, and more students are reporting incidents and seeking help after an incident,” Georgetown President John J. DeGioia said in a statement. “While this upward trend is encouraging, the numbers show that the majority of students still do not seek University assistance after a sexual assault. These trends are consistent with the findings across the AAU schools as a whole, and they highlight the importance of increasing trust in university resources, processes and procedures.”

Iowa State University: After the 2015 survey, “a lot of energy and action went into improving and changing Title IX interventions,” Margo Foreman, Iowa State’s assistant vice president for diversity and inclusion, said in a telephone interview. “That was dramatic and noticeable.” Title IX is a federal anti-discrimination law. Foreman said she expects the new survey will help efforts to provide more targeted intervention for vulnerable students.

More than 5,000 students and faculty and staff members have participated in a program the university launched in 2017 called Green Dot. It teaches bystander awareness and intervention strategies. Of students who witnessed a situation they thought might lead to sexual misconduct, almost three-quarters took action and nearly 44 percent directly intervened, according to the survey. “Students are taking action when they see situations they believe could lead to sexual assault or misconduct,” Vernon Hurte, the university’s dean of students, said in a statement. “These actions may seem small at the time, but they can make a profound difference in the lives of potential victims.”

University of Virginia: “The University of Virginia is committed to the safety of every member of our community,” the university’s executive vice president and chief operating officer, Jennifer “J.J.” Wagner Davis, said in a statement. “The Campus Climate Survey allows us to hear directly from students about their views on the culture on Grounds and the University’s efforts to foster a safe and supportive environment.”

Yale University: “Sexual misconduct has no place at Yale or anywhere,” Yale President Peter Salovey said in a statement. He said he was encouraged by indications in the 2019 survey results that increased community engagement has improved awareness of university resources and bystander intervention. But he added: “I am deeply disturbed by the number of students who have experienced sexual assault, harassment, intimate partner violence, or stalking. Now, we must build on our community engagement efforts to reinforce Yale’s high standards of conduct. I ask every student and member of faculty and staff to join me in creating and sustaining a community that is free of sexual misconduct.”