Well, that didn’t take long: A report on U.S. history published by the Trump administration on Monday was removed from the White House website by President Biden a few days later — and he disbanded the new commission that wrote it.

“The 1776 Report” was released on Martin Luther King Jr. Day and immediately lambasted by historians as racist and false for many of its statements, including its defense of slaveholding Founding Fathers and of the Three-Fifths Compromise, which at the 1787 Constitutional Convention allowed enslavers to count their enslaved people as three-fifths of a person for determining representation in the House of Representative as well as for taxation purposes.

It also likened American progressives to European fascists and contended that the civil rights movement led by Martin Luther King Jr. had devolved into “identity politics.”

On Wednesday, Biden signed the “Executive Order On Advancing Racial Equity and Support for Underserved Communities Through the Federal Government,” which, among other things, disbanded the Advisory 1776 Commission. Trump had created it in November and ordered it to issue a report calling for “patriotic education.”

Section 10, Part C of Biden’s executive order says unceremoniously that the Nov. 2 executive order that Trump had signed establishing the commission “is hereby revoked.”

Not long after the new president signed the order, the report could no longer be found on the White House website where it had resided for a few days.

Trump created the 18-member 1776 Advisory Commission after months of nationwide Black Lives Matter protests against racial injustice and charged it with promoting a “pro-American curriculum” that celebrates “the miracle of American history.”

Right-wing conservatives have long contended, falsely, that teachers who fail to present U.S. history as heroic and who discuss the country’s racist past and present are intentionally indoctrinating students to hate the United States.

Not only was the commission’s report ridiculed by historians, but, according to the Associated Press, parts of it had been published earlier in writings by some members of the panel.

That was discovered, the AP said, when the report was put through software that can detect plagiarism, although Matthew Spalding, the panel’s executive director and a vice president at the conservative Hillsdale College, called it “a return to the unifying ideals stated in the Declaration of Independence.”