CONTROL OF CONGRESS

Updated at 8:38 p.m. Eastern

Full election results

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Last data update: 5:37 p.m. ET

SenateELECTION RESULTS

Democrats secure Senate control

They needed 50 to gain the majority as the vice president breaks a tie.

Results by state

Thirty-five Senate seats are on the ballot this year, including a special election in Oklahoma. Use the dropdown to find full results for your state.

More key results: House | Governors

Senate races The Post is watching

Republicans need a net gain of only one seat to capture control of the Senate. There are nine races rated competitive by the Cook Political Report, five held by Democrats and four held by Republicans. We’re also watching interesting races in Florida, Utah, Iowa and Washington state.

Below are results and insights from The Post’s election model, which estimates the likely outcome based on past election returns as well as votes counted in the race so far. Read more about our model here and here.

Key races right now

Includes Arizona, Georgia and Nevada

  • Ariz.Senate

    Arizona went blue, narrowly, in the 2020 presidential race. It’s a key Senate battleground this year.

    Votes received and percentages of total vote
    CandidatePct.
    winner
    Mark KellyKellyM. Kelly

    incumbent

    DEM
    51.4
    Blake MastersMastersB. MastersGOP
    46.5
    Marc VictorVictorM. VictorLIB
    2.1

    Est. 100% counted

  • Ga.Senate

    This race is headed to a Dec. 6 runoff.

    Votes received and percentages of total vote
    CandidatePct.
    Raphael WarnockWarnockR. Warnock

    incumbent

    DEM
    49.4
    Herschel WalkerWalkerH. WalkerGOP
    48.5
    Chase OliverOliverC. OliverLIB
    2.1

    Est. 100% counted

  • Nev.Senate

    Nevada favored Biden by three percentage points in 2020, and it’s key to whether Democrats can maintain their Senate majority.

    Votes received and percentages of total vote
    CandidatePct.
    winner
    Catherine Cortez MastoCortez MastoC. Cortez Masto

    incumbent

    DEM
    48.9
    Adam LaxaltLaxaltA. LaxaltGOP
    48.0
    OtherOtherOther
    3.1

    Est. 99% counted

Other key races

Includes Colorado, Florida, Iowa, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Utah, Washington and Wisconsin

  • Colo.Senate

    O’Dea is one of the only GOP Senate nominees to break with Trump, but he has an uphill climb in a state that went for Biden by 13 percentage points in 2020.

    Votes received and percentages of total vote
    CandidatePct.
    winner
    Michael BennetBennetM. Bennet

    incumbent

    DEM
    55.9
    Joe O'DeaO'DeaJ. O'DeaGOP
    41.3
    OtherOtherOther
    2.9

    Est. 99% counted

  • Fla.Senate

    Florida has trended increasingly red in presidential years, and both Rubio and Gov. Ron DeSantis are up for reelection this year.

    Votes received and percentages of total vote
    CandidatePct.
    winner
    Marco RubioRubioM. Rubio

    incumbent

    GOP
    57.7
    Val DemingsDemingsV. DemingsDEM
    41.3
    OtherOtherOther
    1.0

    Est. 100% counted

  • IowaSenate

    Grassley is the oldest Republican senator, and would be Senate president pro tempore, or third in line to the presidency, if the GOP recaptures the upper chamber.

    Votes received and percentages of total vote
    CandidatePct.
    winner
    Chuck GrassleyGrassleyC. Grassley

    incumbent

    GOP
    56.1
    Michael FrankenFrankenM. FrankenDEM
    43.9

    Est. 99% counted

  • N.H.Senate

    Republicans are looking for an upset in the Granite State, which went for Biden by eight percentage points in 2020.

    Votes received and percentages of total vote
    CandidatePct.
    winner
    Maggie HassanHassanM. Hassan

    incumbent

    DEM
    53.6
    Donald BolducBolducD. BolducGOP
    44.4
    Jeremy KauffmanKauffmanJ. KauffmanLIB
    2.0

    Est. 99% counted

  • N.C.Senate

    Retiring Republican Sen. Richard Burr’s open seat could go either way in this state Trump narrowly won in 2020.

    Votes received and percentages of total vote
    CandidatePct.
    winner
    Ted BuddBuddT. BuddGOP
    50.5
    Cheri BeasleyBeasleyC. BeasleyDEM
    47.3
    OtherOtherOther
    2.2

    Est. 100% counted

  • OhioSenate

    Trump won Ohio by eight percentage points in 2020, but Democrats are hoping for an upset in this notoriously swingy state.

    Votes received and percentages of total vote
    CandidatePct.
    winner
    J.D. VanceVanceJ. VanceGOP
    53.3
    Tim RyanRyanT. RyanDEM
    46.7

    Est. 99% counted

  • Pa.Senate

    Biden narrowly won Pennsylvania in 2020, and Democrats are hoping Fetterman can flip this open Senate seat to blue.

    Votes received and percentages of total vote
    CandidatePct.
    winner
    John FettermanFettermanJ. FettermanDEM
    51.2
    Mehmet OzOzM. OzGOP
    46.3
    OtherOtherOther
    2.4

    Est. 99% counted

  • UtahSenate

    Lee is facing a surprisingly tough challenge from McMullin, who is running as an independent and says he won’t caucus with either party.

    Votes received and percentages of total vote
    CandidatePct.
    winner
    Mike LeeLeeM. Lee

    incumbent

    GOP
    53.2
    Evan McMullinMcMullinE. McMullinUNA
    42.8
    OtherOtherOther
    4.1

    Est. 99% counted

  • Wash.Senate

    Biden won Washington by almost 20 percentage points in 2020, but Republicans are hoping for an upset in the Evergreen State.

    Votes received and percentages of total vote
    CandidatePct.
    winner
    Patty MurrayMurrayP. Murray

    incumbent

    DEM
    57.3
    Tiffany SmileySmileyT. SmileyGOP
    42.7

    Est. 99% counted

  • Wis.Senate

    Wisconsin narrowly went for Biden in 2020, and Democrats are targeting Johnson’s seat as a key pickup opportunity.

    Votes received and percentages of total vote
    CandidatePct.
    winner
    Ron JohnsonJohnsonR. Johnson

    incumbent

    GOP
    50.5
    Mandela BarnesBarnesM. BarnesDEM
    49.5

    Est. 100% counted

Show more racesRead more

By: Shajia Abidi, Alexis Barnes, Jason Bernert, Lenny Bronner, Dana Cassidy, John Cherian, Tyler Fisher, Holden Foreman, Dylan Freedman, Dara Gold, Jen Haskell, Chloe Langston, Emily Liu, Brittany Renee Mayes, Anthony Pesce, Erik Reyna, Ashlyn Still and Chris Zubak-Skees

Sources: Associated Press, Cook Political Report