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This coverage has ended. Follow here for Wednesday’s updates.

With millions of votes yet to be counted, President Trump falsely asserted election fraud, pledged to mount a legal challenge to official state results and made a premature claim of victory in a bitterly contested race that may take days to resolve. In remarks at the White House early Wednesday, Trump claimed that he won several states that are still counting ballots, including Georgia, North Carolina and Pennsylvania.

His Democratic challenger, Joe Biden, insisted earlier that “we believe we’re on track to win this election” and pleaded for patience, citing Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Michigan, where votes were still being tallied. “It ain’t over till every vote is counted,” Biden said.

Here’s the latest on Election Day …

12:54 a.m.
Headshot of David Weigel
David Weigel: Heading into tonight, two nightmares gripped Democrats: That there would be serious disruption at voting sites, and that the president would declare victory on the way to suing to disqualify ballots. The first scenario didn’t unfold, and the president actually tweeted his prediction of a win, and his desire for late-arriving ballots to not be counted, after Biden had already stepped in front of cameras to say he was likely to win.
David Weigel, National reporter covering politics
12:43 a.m.
Headshot of David Weigel
David Weigel: There’s a rumor going around on Twitter that Fox News has retracted its call of Arizona for Biden and Kelly. That’s not true. The network is basing its early call, which hasn’t been matched by the AP, on the same thing that makes Democrats confident: They didn’t see enough strongly pro-Trump votes coming out on election day, and before that, Biden ran stronger with Republicans than Trump ran with Democrats.
David Weigel, National reporter covering politics
11:52 p.m.
Headshot of David Weigel
David Weigel: There are plenty of bright spots for Republicans in House districts that broke for Trump in 2016, but reelected Democrats in 2018. The question: What happens in those places when all the votes are counted? In Illinois, for example, Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Chair Cheri Bustos (D), who ran 20 points ahead of Hillary Clinton in 2016 and had no serious challenger in 2018, was trailing narrowly after half the votes were counted in her district. Republicans have been losing suburbs by expected margins, but doing better with Election Day rural votes.
David Weigel, National reporter covering politics
9:12 p.m.
Headshot of David Weigel
David Weigel: Ohio continues to show improvement for Biden in suburban and even exurban counties, which at this point in the night are bigger than Trump’s gains in rural areas. In exurban counties that have surpassed their 2016 turnout, Biden is doing far better than Hillary Clinton; he cut Trump’s 17,239-vote margin in Wayne County, near Akron, to a bit less than 10,000 votes. Vinton County, in the Appalachian Valley, is going for Trump by a bigger margin than it did in 2016, but it may cast fewer than 8,000 votes overall. The risk for Biden comes from Election Day GOP votes in places he’s ahead now.
David Weigel, National reporter covering politics
9:10 p.m.
Headshot of Amber Phillips
Amber Phillips: It’s early, but there are signs that Democrats could be underperforming with Latino voters. In addition to struggling with the Cuban American vote in the Miami area, Democrats watching a key House race in Texas’s 23rd Congressional District, a vast border district with many Mexican American voters, said they were surprised with how tight that race had become. The Latino vote is one of the most diverse in America, and 2020 may underscore that it’s not at all a demographic group Democrats can take for granted.
Amber Phillips, Politics Reporter
8:50 p.m.
Headshot of David Weigel
David Weigel: Florida’s Pinellas County tells one of the stories in that state tonight. Biden is running stronger there than Hillary Clinton did four years ago, but the president has added to his raw vote, too. The result’s a close race with a narrow Biden lead, the sort of result that would have won the state for the Democrats four years ago. The party’s problems, like they were in the 2018 midterms, are all about more-conservative Latino voters in Miami-Dade County, and in parts of the Orlando area.
David Weigel, National reporter covering politics
8:01 p.m.
Headshot of David Weigel
David Weigel: Keep an eye on Delaware County, Ohio, a historically Republican area north of Columbus. In 2016, Hillary Clinton lost it handily, winning just 40,872 total votes. With early ballots counted, Biden has already won 46,562 votes; the president was trailing, running 19,000 votes behind the result he ended up with four years ago. Even a Trump romp in the election day vote could put Biden ahead in one of the few Ohio counties that backed Barry Goldwater in 1964.
David Weigel, National reporter covering politics
7:09 p.m.
Headshot of David Weigel
David Weigel: It’s dangerous to read too much from the first votes in Kentucky and Indiana, but the fall-off in third-party voting at the presidential level is notable. In Indiana, a Libertarian nominee for governor who opposes the state’s mask mandates is getting more than six times as many votes as the party’s presidential nominee, Jo Jorgensen. In Kentucky, a Libertarian candidate for Senate is getting twice as many votes as all third-party candidates for president combined.
David Weigel, National reporter covering politics
6:41 p.m.
Headshot of Amber Phillips
Amber Phillips: Could Georgia be a surprise election night win for Senate Democrats? At least two strategists on both sides working on Senate races, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said there is evidence that Sen. David Perdue (R-Ga.) could lose outright Tuesday night to his Democratic challenger, Jon Ossoff. If Ossoff manages to get a majority of the vote, thanks to high Democratic turnout, that would probably spell doom for Senate Republicans’ majority.
Amber Phillips, Politics Reporter
6:06 p.m.
Headshot of David Weigel
David Weigel: It’ll be hours before there’s enough exit-poll data to build a serious analysis of the 2020 electorate. But it’s worth watching how voters’ moods have changed since 2018, when views of the economy were positive but the president’s personality and agenda led to Democratic gains. Then, the better voters felt about the economy, the more likely they were to vote for Trump, but those who were worried or felt things were “about the same” broke heavily for Trump.
David Weigel, National reporter covering politics