Across the country, urban voters turned out to choose their next mayor. In many places, these races pitted Democrat against Democrat over issues such as crime, police reform and racial inequalities.

Atlanta

Fourteen candidates hope to replace Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms (D), who announced she would not seek a second term. If no candidate receives more than 50 percent, the top-two vote getters will advance to a Nov. 30 run-off. Former mayor Kasim Reed (D) and City Council President Felicia A. Moore (D) were frontrunners in polling. The campaign centered on the city’s dramatic spike in homicides and violent crime.

The election has ended with a runoff between Moore and Dickens.

Votes received and percentages of total vote
CandidateVotesPct.
Felicia Moore Moore 39,52040.7%
Andre Dickens Dickens 22,34323.0
Kasim Reed Reed 21,74322.4
Sharon Gay Gay 6,6526.9
Antonio Brown Brown 4,6004.7
Kenny Hill Hill 5460.6
Rebecca King King 3740.4
Mark Hammad Hammad 3460.4
Kirsten Dunn Dunn 2720.3
Walter Reeves Reeves 1630.2
Glenn Wrightson Wrightson 1510.2
Richard Wright Wright 1390.1
Nolan English English 1000.1
Roosevelt Searles Searles 730.1
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97,022 votes reported from 100% of precincts.

Boston

Boston was on the cusp of a historic shift: for the first time in nearly 200 years, the city’s next mayor was not going to be a White man. Michelle Wu (D), the daughter of Taiwanese immigrants, announced a bid against Annissa Essaibi George (D), the daughter of a Tunisian immigrant who identifies as Arab American. Both are city councilors. Wu represents the progressive wing of the party, while Essaibi George is more moderate. Major issues in the campaign included spiraling housing costs, fixing failing schools and the opioid crisis.

Wu is projected to win. 100 percent of precincts are reporting.

Votes received and percentages of total vote
CandidateVotesPct.
Michelle Wu Wu 91,23964.2%
Annissa Essaibi George Essaibi George 50,87935.8
142,118 votes reported from 100% of precincts.

Buffalo

India Walton, a 39-year-old socialist and community organizer, won an upset victory in the Democratic primary over Byron Brown, the incumbent mayor of New York’s second-largest city. Shut out of the Democratic ticket, Brown campaigned for reelection as a write-in candidate. Walton won endorsements from progressive Democrats such as Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (N.Y.). The write-in votes below include Brown and other candidates.

Write In is leading. 100 percent of precincts are reporting.

Votes received and percentages of total vote
CandidateVotesPct.
Write In Write In 36,43959.1%
India Walton Walton 25,19840.9
61,637 votes reported from 100% of precincts.

Detroit

Detroit’s two-term mayor, Mike Duggan (D), and fellow Democrat Anthony Adams were the top-two vote-getters in the August nonpartisan primary. Duggan, a former business executive, campaigned on a promise of job training and economic development. Adams, who served as deputy mayor in a previous administration, ran on cutting poverty and stopping evictions.

Duggan is projected to win. 100 percent of precincts are reporting.

Votes received and percentages of total vote
CandidateVotesPct.

incumbent Mike Duggan

incumbent Duggan

69,32975.6%
Anthony Adams Adams 22,37424.4
91,703 votes reported from 100% of precincts.

Minneapolis

Mayor Jacob Frey (D) is fending off a field of more than a dozen candidates in the city’s first municipal elections since the police killing of George Floyd. Frey is pressing voters to trust him with a second term so that he can continue reforming the police. His top challengers — progressive activist Sheila Nezhad and former state representative Kate Knuth, both Democrats — support the creation of a new public safety agency. 

Minneapolis uses ranked-choice voting to select a mayor, meaning voters ranked their top-three choices. If none of the candidates received a majority of first-choice votes, the last-place candidate would be eliminated, and their votes would be distributed to the voters’ second-choice candidates. The process would be repeated until one of the candidates collected more than half the votes.

Final results

Frey (D) is projected to win. 100 percent of precincts are reporting.

Votes received and percentages of total vote
CandidateVotesPct.

DEM incumbent Jacob Frey

DEM incumbent Frey

70,66956.2%
Kate Knuth Knuth 55,00743.8
Troy Benjegerdes Benjegerdes 00.0
Laverne Turner Turner 00.0
Paul Johnson Johnson 00.0
Jerrell Perry Perry 00.0
Bob Carney Carney 00.0
Mike Winter Winter 00.0
Mark Globus Globus 00.0
AJ Awed Awed 00.0
Clint Connor Connor 00.0
Doug Nelson Nelson 00.0
Christopher David David 00.0
Kevin Ward Ward 00.0
Sheila Nezhad Nezhad 00.0
Nate Atkins Atkins 00.0
Marcus Harcus Harcus 00.0
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125,676 votes reported from 100% of precincts.

First ranked choice results

Frey (D) is leading. 100 percent of precincts are reporting.

Votes received and percentages of total vote
CandidateVotesPct.

DEM incumbent Jacob Frey

DEM incumbent Frey

61,46842.8%
Sheila Nezhad Nezhad 30,33521.1
Kate Knuth Knuth 26,44418.4
AJ Awed Awed 6,8234.7
Laverne Turner Turner 4,6043.2
Clint Connor Connor 4,2903.0
Bob Carney Carney 2,7781.9
Marcus Harcus Harcus 1,1830.8
Nate Atkins Atkins 1,1760.8
Mark Globus Globus 1,1510.8
Doug Nelson Nelson 7350.5
Jerrell Perry Perry 6840.5
Mike Winter Winter 6370.4
Christopher David David 4890.3
Kevin Ward Ward 2800.2
Paul Johnson Johnson 2390.2
Troy Benjegerdes Benjegerdes 1830.1
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143,645 votes reported from 100% of precincts.

Policing ballot question

The continued debate over the future of policing — including a ballot question that would replace the police department with a new department of public safety emphasizing mental health services and violence prevention — has collided with one of the worst violent crime waves in the city’s history. The ballot measure requires 51 percent support to succeed.

No is projected to win. 100 percent of precincts are reporting.

Votes received and percentages of total vote
ResponseVotesPct.
Yes Yes 62,81343.8%
No No 80,50656.2
143,319 votes reported from 100% of precincts.

New York City

In America’s largest city, Democrats outnumber Republicans 6 to 1, so Democratic primary winner Eric Adams had a towering advantage. Adams, the Brooklyn borough president and a former police officer, won the Democratic primary in July after campaigning as a moderate who pledged to tackle rising crime. His Republican opponent was Curtis Sliwa, a tabloid fixture and founder of the Guardian Angels, an unarmed vigilante group.

Adams (D) is projected to win. 100 percent of precincts are reporting.

Votes received and percentages of total vote
CandidateVotesPct.
Eric Adams Adams 753,80167.4%
Curtis Sliwa Sliwa 312,38527.9
Catherine Rojas Rojas 27,9822.5
William Pepitone Pepitone 12,5751.1
Quanda Francis Francis 3,7920.3
Stacey Prussman Prussman 3,1890.3
Raja Flores Flores 2,3870.2
Fernando Mateo Mateo 1,8700.2
Skiboky Stora Stora 2640.0
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1,118,245 votes reported from 100% of precincts.

Pittsburgh

Mayoral candidate Ed Gainey won the Democratic primary in May, defeating incumbent Bill Peduto and several others. Tony Moreno, a former police officer who lost in the Democratic primary, opted to run on the Republican ticket instead. Gainey would become the city’s first Black mayor if elected. 

Gainey (D) is projected to win. 96.5 percent of precincts are reporting.

Votes received and percentages of total vote
CandidateVotesPct.
Ed Gainey Gainey 48,43071.2%
Tony Moreno Moreno 19,55228.8
67,982 votes reported from 96.5% of precincts.

By: Alexis Barnes, Aaron Brezel, Jason Bernert, Lenny Bronner, John Cherian, Hong Du, Armand Emamdjomeh, Holden Foreman, Dylan Freedman, Aditya Jain, Emily Liu, Paige Moody, Anthony Pesce, Erik Reyna, Ashlyn Still, Kavya Sukumar and Susan Tyler

Previous contributors: Sophie Andrews, Peter Andringa, Mohar Chatterjee, Madison Dong, Jess Eng, Alanna Flores, Simon Glenn-Gregg, Daniel Hoerauf, Jason Holt, Shana Hadi, Isabelle Lavandero, Deblina Mukherjee and Jeong Shin