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Virginia election results

Last Updated: Nov 6, 2019, 1:51 PM EST

Democrats have won majorities in both the Virginia state Senate and House of Delegates. Republicans entered the night with narrow margins in both chambers, but Democrats flipped at least two seats in the Senate and at least five in the House of Delegates to take control of the state’s legislature.

The race for control

Democrat called/leading

Republican called/leading

Other candidates called/leading*

< 10% reporting

House of Delegates

54 Democrats Check
43 Republicans
EVEN

State Senate

21 Democrats Check
19 Republicans
EVEN

*Third party or total write-in

Because Virginia has a Democratic governor, Democrats will have full control of Virginia’s government for the first time in 26 years. This gives the party nearly unfettered power to redraw state legislative and congressional districts, setting the course for Virginia politics for the next decade.

Virginia’s legislative elections drew high interest this year, with a flood of donations and a surge in absentee voting. Democratic candidates ran all but four of 40 state Senate districts and all but eight of 100 House districts. On the other hand, the GOP had candidates in just 25 state Senate districts and 72 House districts.

Alexandria

Roanoke

Virginia Beach

Charlottesville

Richmond

Called/leading Republican

Called/leading Democrat

Leading write-in

Estimated turnout

So far 823,694 Democratic votes, 860,993 Republican votes and 55,187 votes for other candidates have been counted statewide for all contested House of Delegates races. We estimate this is more than three-quarters of expected turnout.

House races to watch

A rematch from 2017, when Randall Minchew’s (R) own sister-in-law voted against him amid the anti-Trump wave.

Democrat

Wendy Gooditis*Check

52.4%

Republican

Randall Minchew

47.6%

* Incumbent

Kelly Convirs-Fowler (D) is a freshman trying to hold on in a swing district.

Democrat

Kelly Convirs-Fowler*Check

54.6%

Republican

Shannon Kane

45.4%

* Incumbent

Del. Roxann Robinson (R) is competing in a rematch against Larry Barnett (D). Two years ago, Barnett lost to the veteran legislator by just 128 votes.

Republican

Roxann Robinson*

50.3%

Democrat

Larry Barnett

49.7%

* Incumbent

Josh Cole (D) lost a race for this seat two years ago, in a squeaker to now-Del. Robert M. Thomas Jr. (R). Thomas lost the GOP nomination this year to Paul Milde (R), who made an issue of the delegate’s vote to expand Medicaid.

Democrat

Josh ColeCheck

52.0%

Republican

Paul Milde

48.0%

Del. Tim Hugo (R) is a member of the GOP leadership and the last Republican House member in Northern Virginia. Dan Helmer (D) has been running on gun control, attracting help and money from former congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords and other outside groups.

Republican

Tim Hugo*

46.8%

Democrat

Dan HelmerCheck

53.2%

* Incumbent

Del. Lee Carter (D), a freshman and self-described Socialist, vs. Ian Lovejoy (R).

Democrat

Lee Carter*Check

53.4%

Republican

Ian Lovejoy

46.6%

* Incumbent

House Speaker Kirk Cox (R) must compete on a new map that swung from heavily favoring Republicans to tilting slightly blue. The symbolic value of the race has helped Sheila Bynum-Coleman (D) raise enormous sums and help from national Democrats.

Republican

Kirk Cox*Check

51.7%

Democrat

Sheila Bynum-Coleman

47.1%

* Incumbent

Incumbent Chris Jones (R) is the powerful Appropriations Committee chairman, but his district now leans heavily Democratic under a new map imposed by federal court to remedy racial gerrymandering.

Republican

Chris Jones*

43.6%

Democrat

Clinton JenkinsCheck

56.4%

* Incumbent

This a rematch from 2017, when Del. David Yancey (R) and Shelly Simonds (D) tied and the race was decided by a random drawing live on national television.

Republican

David Yancey*

40.3%

Democrat

Shelly SimondsCheck

57.8%

* Incumbent

Correction (Nov. 7): A previous version of this page listed the total votes cast for Democratic and Republican candidates, but mislabeled the figures as statewide totals. Only votes cast in contested races were included.

By Jason Bernert, Lenny Bronner, Madison Dong, Simon Glenn-Gregg, Jason Holt, Isabelle Lavandero, Erik Reyna, Ashlyn Still and Susan Tyler

Additional contributions from Laura Vozzella and Gregory S. Schneider

Sources: AP, Virginia Department of Elections


For the Virginia general election in 2019, The Washington Post has developed a model that estimates turnout for each state House and state Senate district before voting begins, then updates these estimates throughout the night as precincts report.

Previously, the best way for us to estimate votes remaining was to use the fraction of precincts that have reported their results, usually expressed like this: “50 out of 1,750 precincts reporting.” However, depending on early voting and the distribution of votes between precincts, this “precincts reporting” metric can be a misleading estimate of how many votes are actually left to be counted.

The foundation of our model is that past turnout predicts future turnout. We collected data from previous elections that most closely resembled this one and used these to form our base estimates for turnout in each state House and state Senate district. But a novel feature of our model is that it should respond to precincts that have already reported and update its estimates based on this new information. This is intuitive, as the same factors that might drive increased turnout in one precinct would likely drive increased turnout in other precincts within the same district. These kinds of factors might also suggest increased turnout across the entire election.

If you’re interested in additional details, we’ve published a full writeup on our engineering blog, and we’re also planning on making much of our model code public — so stay tuned!