Virginia Governor

Glenn Youngkin (R) is projected to win.

Number of votes and percentage of total vote received by eachcandidate
VotesPct.
YoungkinGOP1,663,59650.6%
50.6%
McAuliffeDEM1,600,11648.7
48.7

Lieutenant Governor

Winsome Sears (R) is projected to win.

Number of votes and percentage of total vote received by eachcandidate
VotesPct.
SearsGOP1,658,76750.8%
50.8%
AyalaDEM1,608,69149.2
49.2

Note: Maps on this page won’t indicate a leading candidate in each county until an estimated 35 percent of the vote has been reported there.

Virginia’s political identity was up for grabs in the Nov. 2 election, with races for governor, lieutenant governor and attorney general as well as all 100 seats in the House of Delegates on the ballot.

For Republicans, whose last statewide win was in 2009 and who saw their losses mount under President Donald Trump, the general election was a test of whether the party could regain its footing in the onetime swing state. For Democrats, who hoped to hold on to all three statewide offices and control of the House, the races were a chance to solidify Virginia’s status as a blue state and continue advancing their agenda.

2021 Northern Virginia local election results

Governor

The governor’s race — one of only two such contests this November — was a neck-and-neck, big-spending battle between Democratic former governor Terry McAuliffe and Republican multimillionaire Glenn Youngkin. McAuliffe aimed to become only the second governor since the Civil War to serve two terms in the state, which prohibits governors from holding consecutive terms. Youngkin, a former private-equity executive who has never held public office, tapped his personal fortune to bankroll his campaign.

Youngkin (R) is projected to win. An estimated 99 percent of votes have been counted.

Votes received and percentages of total vote
CandidateVotesPct.
Glenn Youngkin Youngkin 1,663,59650.6%
Terry McAuliffe McAuliffe 1,600,11648.7
Princess Blanding Blanding 23,1250.7
An estimated 99% of votes have been counted.

Where McAuliffe and Youngkin are getting their votes

Terry McAuliffe’s margins shrank significantly in cities, suburbs and exurbs that Joe Biden had carried handily just a year before.

County leader

McAuliffe

Youngkin

Size of lead

Urban counties

McAuliffe leads by 135,962 votes

Suburban counties

McAuliffe leads by 9,769 votes

Rural counties

Youngkin leads by 209,211 votes

Lt. Governor

No matter the outcome, the lieutenant governor's race was bound to make history, with one of the candidates — Democrat Hala S. Ayala or Republican Winsome E. Sears — becoming the first woman of color to hold a statewide office. Ayala emerged from her early life as a single parent struggling to provide for her children to a role as a state delegate, advancing Democratic issues such as expanding Medicaid. Sears, a former state delegate, hoped her background as a Jamaican-born former Marine whose faith pulled her through hard times would energize Republicans.

Sears (R) is projected to win. 100 percent of precincts are reporting.

Votes received and percentages of total vote
CandidateVotesPct.
Winsome Sears Sears 1,658,76750.8%
Hala Ayala Ayala 1,608,69149.2
3,267,458 votes reported from 100% of precincts.

Attorney General

Two-term Democratic attorney general Mark Herring faced a challenge from Republican Jason Miyares. Miyares, a Cuban American delegate from Virginia Beach who would become the state's first Latino attorney general, attacked Herring as someone who put politics over public safety, failing to hold violent offenders accountable and protect victims of crime. Herring said Miyares is a conservative throwback who would undo hard-won progress on gun safety, same-sex marriage and health care.

Miyares (R) is projected to win. 100 percent of precincts are reporting.

Votes received and percentages of total vote
CandidateVotesPct.
Jason Miyares Miyares 1,647,53450.4%

DEM incumbent Mark Herring

DEM incumbent Herring

1,621,22749.6
3,268,761 votes reported from 100% of precincts.

House of Delegates

All 100 seats in the House of Delegates were on the ballot, as Democrats hoped to protect the 55-45 majority they won in the 2019 elections. That broke a 20-year run of Republican control in the House. With so much at stake, both parties mustered candidates in all but a handful of districts — a historically high level of competition.

A winner had not yet been projected in two races as of Nov. 10 because vote totals were within the range of a potential recount. Republicans need to win at least one of these seats to gain a majority in the House.

48-5
50
50+5
Democrats
Republicans

Seat

Current leader