In ‘Billie Eilish,’ the pop star opens her family photo album, revealing another side of herself

(Photo courtesy of the family of Billie Eilish.)
(Photo courtesy of the family of Billie Eilish.)
Eilish’s photo-heavy book is a vivid companion to her dark, ethereal music.
  • 4 days ago
  • Review

African speculative fiction is finally getting its due. Let’s talk about books to seek out.

A few of the fresh voices: Tade Thompson, Nnedi Okorafor, Sofia Samatar and Suyi Davies Okungbowa.
  • 1 day ago

How a decades-long conversation shaped the young United States

Akhil Reed Amar celebrates the debates that led to revolt, the Constitution and U.S. law.

The ‘frat boy culture’ of the Secret Service

Carol Leonnig exposes the agency’s history of troubling conduct and missteps.
  • 1 day ago

Timeless meditations on Earth’s fragility, and the damage humans do

A collection of writings by E.O. Wilson emphasizes the dire need to preserve biodiversity.
  • 1 day ago

The not-so-surprising secrets of wealthy investors

William Green explores their widely different strategies for becoming rich — and happy.
  • 1 day ago

The conflicts and characters behind the world’s constitutions

Linda Colley argues that wars create pressures that lead to foundational documents.
  • 1 day ago

Annette Gordon-Reed’s ‘On Juneteenth’ complicates notions of Black history

The trailblazing historian uses her upbringing and Texas’s lively past to puncture well-worn myths.
  • 1 day ago
  • Review

‘Lies With Man’ shines a light on anti-gay policies. It’s also a great legal novel.

The latest volume of Michael Nava’s Henry Rios mystery series demonstrates his mastery of the genre.
  • 2 days ago
  • Review

‘A Lonely Man’ is an elegant suspense novel in the tradition of the ‘The Third Man’

Chris Power’s new novel follows the complicated relationship of two writers in Berlin.
  • 2 days ago
  • Review

Forget the bestseller list: These lesser-known works deserve your attention

“Yesterday’s Tomorrows,” by Mike Ashley and “Sphinxes and Obelisks,” by Mark Valentine bring together works of forgotten “genre” fiction.
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