(Michelle Mruk for The Washington Post)
(Michelle Mruk for The Washington Post)
  • May 23
  • Review

The collection of essays focuses on all things fantastical.

  • Paul Di Filippo
  • ·
  • Review

The novel shows the ways different people interpret and revise what they witnessed, limning events in telling ways.

  • Maggie Trapp
  • ·
  • Review

The novelist channels the music in every voice, from lowlife philosopher to slow-footed thug, ponderous wit to fluting child.

  • Ellen Akins
  • ·

‘Ducks, Newburyport’ is a 1,000-plus page female monologue. Might our focus on its heft be a little sexist, the author wonders?

  • Review

In “Year of the Monkey,” the singer revisits her 70th year, when she lost two of her closest friends.

  • Jake Cline
  • ·
  • Review

In alternating chapters, the twin musicians look back at their tumultuous teen years.

  • Jancee Dunn
  • ·
  • Perspective

From Stephen Chbosky’s long-awaited sophomore effort to André Aciman’s follow-up to “Call Me By Your Name.”

Chevalier’s new novel, ‘A Single Thread,’ tells the tale of a woman who embroiders cushions for a grand British cathedral.

  • Carole Burns
  • ·
  • Review

“Brooklyn: The Once and Future City” looks at the history of a place Walt Whitman, Spike Lee, Bernie Sanders and Barbra Streisand called home.

  • Paul Alexander
  • ·
  • Review

John Englehardt’s use of the second-person perspective creates an aching immediacy.

  • Kristen Millares Young
  • ·
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