(Michelle Mruk for The Washington Post)
(Michelle Mruk for The Washington Post)
  • May 23
  • Review

Sam Staggs’s “Finding Zsa Zsa” looks at a family that “never stopped working at” being famous.

  • Louis Bayard
  • ·
  • Review

Despite its eccentricities, Zink’s latest novel is surprisingly conventional.

  • Review

Tupelo Hassman’s follow-up to “Girlchild” has a lighter touch and a more hopeful message.

  • Bethanne Patrick
  • ·
  • Review

Anthropologist Franz Boas and his students challenged 20th-century prejudices, Charles King writes.

  • Rachel Newcomb
  • ·
  • Review

Angie Maxwell and Todd Shields trace the strategic transformation of a region and a party.

  • Curtis Wilkie
  • ·
  • Review

Richard Panek explains the fundamental strangeness of a fundamental force.

  • Amelia Urry
  • ·
  • Review

Svetlana Alexievich collects the memories of those who witnessed tragedy at a young age.

  • Marianne Szegedy-Maszak
  • ·
  • Review

John Clubbe examines how an era of “new and strange ideas” influenced the composer and his works.

  • Tim Page
  • ·
  • Review

Christopher Leonard explores the sprawling company and its influence on the U.S. economy.

  • Review

In Yoko Ogawa’s novel, remembering is a dangerous pastime.

  • Jon Michaud
  • ·
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