(Illustrations by Neiko Ng. Paper engineering/pop-up design by Simon Arizpe. Photos by Bill O’Leary.)
(Illustrations by Neiko Ng. Paper engineering/pop-up design by Simon Arizpe. Photos by Bill O’Leary.)
Of all the outstanding titles that grabbed our attention this year, these stood out.
  • Review

Peter Sagal’s ‘The Incomplete Book of Running’ explores the power of exercise

  • Review

In ‘Wit’s End,’James Geary takes a serious look at humor.

Interest in the book — and the former first lady’s arena tour — just keep growing.

  • Hugo Kugiya
  • ·
  • Review

“What lies behind her closed eyes, her skinny chest?” author Camille Laurens asks in “Little Dancer Aged Fourteen.”

  • Celia Wren
  • ·
  • Review

Anuradha Roy’s “All the Lives We Never Lived” offers a lyrical look at loss.

  • Review

The famed scientist probes the big questions in accessible prose.

  • Kitty Ferguson
  • ·
  • Review

Nathaniel Philbrick recounts Washington’s frustration with the French and his fear the cause would be lost.

  • Carol Berkin
  • ·
  • Review

Paul Volcker decries the role private interests play in eroding sound money and good government.

  • Stephanie Mehta
  • ·
  • Review

Stephen Carter’s tale of his grandmother reveals the paradoxes of a segregated America.

  • Cinque Henderson
  • ·
  • Review

Amos Oz defends his country’s moderates and blames fanaticism for all its turmoil.

  • Dara Horn
  • ·
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The Washington Post Bestsellers Dec 2
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How are these calculated?
The Post compiles its bestsellers lists by combining hard cover, paperback and ebook sales data from NPD Book and Amazon.com — including qualified borrows of books read through Amazon's digital subscription program. The Post excludes non-narrative books at its sole discretion.
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