• Review

In “I Love You But I’ve Chosen Darkness,” a conflicted new mother abandons her child and husband.

  • Review

In Patti Callahan’s “Once Upon a Wardrobe,” a logic-minded teenager learns the power of stories during afternoons with C.S. Lewis.

  • Keishel Williams
  • ·
  • Review

The new memoir by the actor and activist is by turns revealing and funny.

  • Celia Wren
  • ·

Mr. Pinkney brought new life to old fairy tales — and to children’s literature as a whole — with his radiant illustrations in more than 100 picture books.

  • Review

Antrim’s memoir offers an unvarnished portrait of suicidal thinking and finding a way out.

  • Michael Mewshaw
  • ·

Wil Haygood explores its evolution, from forgotten auteurs to “Black Panther.”

Sheryll Cashin traces the history of segregation, disinvestment and criminalization.

  • Ellis Cose
  • ·

The term is a creation of the age of globalization, writes George Makari.

  • Rachel Newcomb
  • ·

Samuel Moyn ponders the consequences of the U.S. approach to conflicts.

  • Dennis C. Jett
  • ·
  • Perspective

Frank Herbert’s magnum opus: masterful or clumsy? Denis Villeneuve’s movie continues the debate.

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