(Julia Rothman for The Washington Post)
(Julia Rothman for The Washington Post)
A book’s final lines can make or break the experience. Here are some of the best.
  • Feb 14
  • Review

Victoria Riskin’s memoir of her parents chronicles the relatively few years they had together.

  • Dennis Drabelle
  • ·
  • Review

Joel Simon says the choices — like whether to pay ransom — are fraught, and the results often heartbreaking.

  • Review

Akiko Busch explores the strategies we devise to avoid being seen.

  • Michael S. Roth
  • ·
  • Review

Timothy P. Carney shows how the decline of social connectedness affects vulnerable individuals and communities.

  • Andy Smarick
  • ·
  • Review

Esmé Weijun Wang ponders her life as a schizophrenic.

  • Nora Caplan-Bricker
  • ·
  • Review

David Wallace-Wells paints a scary portrait of our future lives on Earth.

  • Fred Pearce
  • ·
  • Review

Don Winslow completes his “Power of the Dog” trilogy with the furious, impassioned “The Border.”

  • Bill Sheehan
  • ·
  • Review

Charles Finch’s ‘The Vanishing Man’ is a delightful caper that captures Victorian London

  • Carol Memmott
  • ·
  • Review

“The Worst Journey in the World,” by Apsley Cherry-Garrard is the ultimate cold-weather adventure tale.

  • Review

Kate Quinn’s follow-up to “The Alice Network” is compulsively readable historical fiction.

  • Kristin Hannah
  • ·
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The Washington Post Bestsellers Feb 17
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How are these calculated?
The Post compiles its bestsellers lists by combining hard cover, paperback and ebook sales data from NPD Book and Amazon.com — including qualified borrows of books read through Amazon's digital subscription program. The Post excludes non-narrative books at its sole discretion.
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