Former ballerina Julie Kent, one of American Ballet Theatre’s most esteemed stars and the artistic director of the Washington Ballet, recently contracted covid-19. Kent announced her diagnosis in an Instagram post Saturday, which is also her 51st birthday.

“A couple weeks ago, I tested positive for covid-19,” wrote Kent, who retired from American Ballet Theatre in 2015 after a 29-year career. She joined the Washington Ballet the following year. “Thankfully, I am recovering well.”

Kent did not return phone calls and text messages seeking comment.

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A couple weeks ago, I tested positive to COVID-19. Thankfully, I am recovering well.... But the past weeks and months have brought extraordinary stress and worry ... ...for the health of my children, husband and mother ...for the jeopardized careers of dancers for whom I am responsible ...for dancers of color that feel unchampioned or marginalized ...for the fragile existence of ballet companies across our country ...for our future. I have joined hundreds of thousands of people around the world that took every precaution, and still contracted this virus. No matter how careful we all are, this can happen to anyone. There is no stigma. Today, on my 51st birthday, I am filled with gratitude... For my family... my health.... my experiences & those who made them possible... and for my friends who I love, and who offer love in return. God bless us all.🙏🏻

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In her post, Kent does not elaborate on how she might have contracted the virus. But at least three ballet employees became sick after the Washington Ballet’s online gala June 18, according to several people with knowledge of the gala’s fallout who spoke on the condition of anonymity as they were not authorized to speak publicly on behalf of the ballet.

These are in addition to gala co-chair Ashley Bronczek’s covid-19 diagnosis, which was previously reported by The Washington Post.

Also among those sickened was a Washington Ballet dancer “who had a non-dancing role in the gala,” according to the American Guild of Musical Artists, the dancers’ union.

“We are pleased that he has made a full recovery,” AGMA said in a statement.

The gala, titled “The Washington Ballet Takes Center Stage,” was streamed online but was put together with a large degree of in-person collaboration at the ballet headquarters on Wisconsin Avenue NW. Some of the dance performances on view were filmed outdoors in advance; others were live-streamed from the ballet’s studios, where dancers, funders and Kent gathered for performances and remarks.

Ballet officials said they followed all guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Control in the preparations and at the gala.

Kent posted her Instagram announcement along with a photo in which she is hugging her two children. “The past weeks and months have brought extraordinary stress and worry,” she wrote, “for the health of my children, husband and mother … for the jeopardized careers of dancers for whom I am responsible.

“No matter how careful we all are, this can happen to anyone. … There is no stigma.”

The Washington Ballet has been shut down since March 13. It has not announced plans for reopening, though a spokesman said recently that its fall season would probably be completely digital and that plans for its annual “Nutcracker” performances would be announced in August.