In D.C. Dream Day, we ask our favorite people in the area to tell us how they would spend a perfect day in the District.


Author Linda Holmes' debut novel is the romantic comedy "Evvie Drake Starts Over." (Tim Coburn)

As the host of the NPR podcast “Pop Culture Happy Hour,” Linda Holmes knows a thing or two about analyzing storytelling tropes. When she wrote her debut novel, the romantic comedy “Evvie Drake Starts Over,” out Tuesday, she understood what type of tale she wanted to tell — and not tell. “It’s the kind of story that I like,” Holmes says of the novel, which tracks the budding relationship between a recently widowed woman and a down-and-out baseball star. “I have certain things that I don’t like to see in those stories. I don’t like them to become too rescue-oriented, and I don’t like them to become too rooted in people not liking each other and then suddenly deciding that they do.” Holmes, 48, will discuss her contribution to the rom-com canon in a talk at Politics and Prose (5015 Connecticut Ave. NW; June 26, 7 p.m., free). On her perfect day in the area, the Takoma Park, Md., resident would enjoy the outdoors and give her dog, Brian, plenty of love.

When you wake up in the morning, you have to have a certain amount of couch time with the dog. So I drink coffee, and Brian snuggles up and feels secure and happy. It’s a big part of his day. It’s our morning coffee ritual, which, look, I call “morning snugs,” OK? It’s very important. And if I’m going to have much breakfast, maybe I’m making myself a little egg-on-toast situation.

My dream day has to be a Sunday because I would go to the Takoma Park Farmers Market. It opens at 10 a.m. and you have to get there at, like, 9:45 so you can get in line for the guy who has the best eggs. Then you go to the produce people, and there’s also a place where I like to get a cheese — I think it’s called dragon’s breath? It’s the hottest, pepper-iest pepper jack in the world. It’s extremely, extremely spicy. There’s also a bakery that sells great bread, and a place that has great apple cider at certain times of the year. I’d just hang out and hopefully run into the guy there who’s a one-man band, complete with the knee cymbals. It’s crazy — I love it.

I don’t really trust the Red Line anymore, so I’m probably driving. It would be a nice day, and I’d get around in my car and listen to a little Elvis Costello with the windows down.

I’m heading toward downtown Silver Spring at this point. There’s a pub there called McGinty’s Public House that I sometimes go to. I’d drop in and have a burger lunch.

From there, I would head over to the AFI Silver for an afternoon matinee. They have this giant, beautiful, art deco theater that they often use for their repertory showings — that’s where I saw “Ghostbusters” when it was 25 years old. I’d get a glass of wine, chill out and watch “Singin’ in the Rain.”

I’ve been going back and forth about whether I want to go to dinner at Hank’s Oyster Bar or Rasika, because I love them both. If it’s a nice day and I can sit outside, then I’m going to Hank’s near Dupont Circle. They’ll let you sit there and have drinks and popcorn shrimp all day. So good.

Then I’m probably coming home to my house, sitting on my back porch, having some prosecco and watching my dog run around in the backyard. Yes, that’s a lot of dog content — I understand.