Jeffrey MacMillan / The Washington Post Jeffrey MacMillan / The Washington Post

Whether you’re embarking on your first full week back on the job this month, or you’re on a month-long work bender, you might be in the mood for a momentary break. Enter Blog Log, where we round up all that’s worthy on the Internet for your momentary amusement. In this daily dose, we discuss famous foodstuffs, famous apps named after foodstuffs, scary and not-so-scary goblins and Kim Jong Un in a Speedo, which kind of sounds goblin-esque… Here goes:

“Always it is a hot dog. Never is it anything special. Yoda this paragraph wrote.” — Albert Burneko at deadspin.com complains about D.C.’s half-smoke. He ranked the chili-slathered sausage at No. 36 in his list of “foods of the states,” which grades signature foodstuffs from the 50 states plus D.C. Maryland’s crab cake came in at fourth place, while Virginia’s ham ranked 34th. If you think that’s controversial, then look away from the top and last spots. Burneko ranked Chicago-style deep-dish pizza (Illinois) as his first-choice state signature food and Cincinnati-style chili (Ohio) as his last. Discuss!

“So Shep Smith’s day at work is exactly like mine …” — commenter Lizzy Trotta at buzzfeed.com reacts to a news segment in which Fox News anchor Shepard Smith explains why “Candy Crush,” a gaming app, can be addictive. More talked-about than Smith’s story, however, is how he reported it — he played the game, using a giant tablet device in the middle of the Fox News newsroom.

“It doesn’t have anywhere near the glamour of David Bowie, what with the embarrassing redness and all, but the goblin shark has adapted in incredible ways to life in the darkness. It’s the real goblin king.” — Matt Simon at wired.com compares a deep-sea creature called the goblin shark to David Bowie’s famous “Labyrinth” character Jareth the Goblin King. The former, which looks red and slimy, is much more terrifying than the Bowie version, Simon concludes.

“In case this wasn’t creepy enough for you, the park includes a life-size plaster statue of now-deceased leader Kim Jong Il, in the lobby for an indoor swimming pool.” — Max Fisher at washingtonpost.com describes the decor at a water park that opened last week in Pyongyang, North Korea. The country celebrated the park’s opening with a military parade because nothing sets the mood for a fun day at the water park like goose-stepping. And Kim Jong Un in a Speedo.