If you grew up in the 1980s and ’90s, chances are you were obsessed with at least one movie written or directed by John Hughes. In films like “Sixteen Candles,” “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” and “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation,” Hughes fans saw teens who talked, dressed and related to the world like they themselves did. But few fans went to the lengths that Jason Diamond did to honor the writer-director-producer.

Diamond, now 36 and the sports editor at Rolling Stone, spent a large part of his 20s attempting to write the ultimate Hughes biography — without any qualifications, a publisher or access to the people who actually knew the late filmmaker. Needless to say, it didn’t work out, but Diamond still got a book out of it.

In “Searching for John Hughes: Or Everything I Thought I Needed to Know About Life I Learned From Watching ’80s Movies,” Diamond traces his Hughes obsession, from his troubled childhood in the suburbs of Chicago — the same suburbs where Hughes grew up and filmed many of his movies — and on to New York and his doomed quest to write the biography that never was. Peppered throughout the new memoir are references to and details about all the movies that meant so much to Diamond and helped him through some hard times.

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The first John Hughes movie Diamond saw was 1986’s “Pretty in Pink”; his teenage baby sitter showed it to him when he was a kid. “I was so taken by Molly Ringwald’s character,” Diamond says. “She was like my first idol. She’s so cool.”

Diamond was hooked, and he found himself relating to more and more characters that Hughes had created. He was like weirdo Allison in “The Breakfast Club,” while the jocks at his school reminded him of Jake Ryan from “Sixteen Candles.” Diamond began watching “Planes, Trains and Automobiles” every Thanksgiving — a tradition he still keeps. These were the movies that got Diamond through childhood abuse, his parents abandoning him when he was a teenager, and years of depression. Then there was the Hughes biography.

“I had no idea what I wanted to do with that biography,” Diamond says. “I wanted to put the whole kitchen sink in there, plus the cabinet, and the fridge, all into one book.” Diamond still loves Hughes — who died in 2009 at the age of 59 — and the man’s movies, of course, but in a healthier way. (He’s not secretly stalking any actors anymore.)

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Diamond now lives in Brooklyn, but he likes to go back to the Chicago suburbs every now and again and drive to Cameron’s glass house from “Bueller” or the church where Samantha’s sister got married in “Sixteen Candles.” “I find excuses to go back there,” Diamond says, adding that he took his wife last year to show her where he grew up … with a stop at the “Home Alone” house.

Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW; Fri., 7 p.m., free.

More things to do in D.C. this week:

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