“The Scottsboro Boys” makes its D.C. debut on Tuesday. (Signature Theatre)

May 18
Jazz in the Garden: JoGo Project
National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden, Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue NW; Fri., 5-8:30 p.m., free.
There are few D.C. summertime staples as enduring as Jazz in the Garden. Every Friday from mid-May to late August, office drones, interns and tourists alike gather at the National Gallery of Art’s Sculpture Garden to sip sangria and watch jazz. Sometimes, the music plays second fiddle to the scenery and the hum of conversation. But at this year’s opener, you should pay special attention to the band, the JoGo Project. Led by Chuck Brown Band saxophonist Elijah Jamal Balbed, the group fuses go-go and jazz into something you’d only find in the District.

May 18
Amen Dunes
The Anthem, 901 Wharf St. SW; Fri., 8 p.m., $45-$75.
In March, Damon McMahon released “Freedom,” his fifth album as Amen Dunes and the first in four years. Backed by his usual band and a series of new contributors, the New York-based musician’s latest has a soulful and mysterious psychedelic-folk edge. That sound will act as an apt appetizer for Fleet Foxes as Amen Dunes opens for the folk band at The Anthem on Friday.

May 20
Dhaya Lakshminarayanan
DC Improv, 1140 Connecticut Ave. NW; Sun., 7 p.m., $17.
Dhaya Lakshminarayanan left a career as a venture capitalist in Silicon Valley to pursue comedy. Now the MIT grad is an up-and-coming stand-up who has appeared on NPR’s “Snap Judgment” and hosts a monthly storytelling show in her San Francisco home base. Presented by DC Science Comedy, the show also features local comedian (and science journalist) Kasha Patel.

May 21
Tune-Yards
9:30 Club, 815 V St. NW; Mon., 7 p.m., $30.
Lyrically, Tune-Yards’ latest album, “I Can Feel You Creep Into My Private Life,” addresses race in America — sometimes uneasily. Musically, it’s an upbeat dance party of a record, an evolution from the R&B sounds of 2014’s “Nikki Nack.” Singer Merrill Garbus has always borrowed from various genres (world music was an early influence), which will make Monday’s show at 9:30 Club a varied affair.

Opens May 22
‘The Scottsboro Boys’
Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave., Arlington; Tue. through July 1, $40-$110.
Nominated for 12 Tonys in 2011, “The Scottsboro Boys” makes its D.C. debut with a production at Signature. Featuring a score by John Kander and Fred Ebb, the legendary songwriters behind “Cabaret” and “Chicago,” the musical tells the true story of a group of black teenagers in Alabama who were falsely accused of rape and hastily sentenced to death in 1931.