Self-rising flour is a lower-protein all-purpose flour mixed with baking powder and salt. It’s popular in many Southern baking recipes and can be found in many grocery stores, particularly in the South. If store-bought self-rising proves hard to find, it’s a cinch to make at home.

Keep in mind that if using a higher protein all-purpose flour, such as King Arthur Baking brand, your crumb will be a bit tougher/sturdier than with the softer flour variety.

Storage: It’s best to mix self-rising flour as you need it, as exposure to air will oxidize the mixture and lessen its efficacy. However, it can be stored in a cool, dark place for up to 2 weeks.

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Ingredients

  • 1 cup (125 grams) all-purpose flour or gluten-free all-purpose flour mix such as Bob’s Red Mill Gluten-Free 1-to-1 Baking Flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons (6 grams) baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt or table salt

Step 1

In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder and salt until thoroughly combined.


Nutrition Information

Per serving (1 cup), based on 1.

Calories: 458; Total Fat: 1 g; Saturated Fat: 0 g; Cholesterol: 0 mg; Sodium: 1066 mg; Carbohydrates: 97 g; Dietary Fiber: 3 g; Sugar: 0 g; Protein: 13 g

This analysis is an estimate based on available ingredients and this preparation. It should not substitute for a dietitian’s or nutritionist’s advice.


Adapted from King Arthur Baking.

Tested by Olga Massov; email questions to voraciously@washpost.com.

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correction

A previous version of this article mistakenly omitted the step of adding baking powder and salt to Bob's Red Mill Gluten-Free 1-to-1 Baking Flour to create a gluten-free self-rising flour. This version has been corrected.