The Babysitters Club (TV-G)

Streaming

Age 10+

Tween-friendly books-based reboot celebrates friendship.

The Babysitters Club” is a reboot of the same-named 1990s show, both of which were inspired by the popular book series by Ann M. Martin, who serves as the show’s producer. The series centers on a group of teen girls who run a successful business that incorporates their unique talents and their shared interest in caring for children. Episodes deal with serious issues like divorce, gender identity and racism, as well as accompanying strong emotions, but the friends always step up to help one another and to be positive role models for the kids in their charge. Expect mild language along the lines of “stupid,” “nerd,” “idiot,” “butt” and “oh my God.” Ultimately, though, what stands out in this series is the entrepreneurial spirit of five female friends with a passion for helping children, loyalty to one another and creative ideas for promoting their business model. (10 roughly half-hour episodes)

Available via Netflix streaming.

Mighty Oak (PG-13)

Streaming

Age 13+

Somewhat dark rock dramedy has drinking, strong language.

Mighty Oak” is a dramedy about a talented 10-year-old guitarist (the titular Oak, played by Tommy Ragen) who may or may not be the reincarnation of a singer who died 10 years earlier. Much of the movie is tween-friendly, but it has many uses of the word “s---” (and other language), as well as heavy themes related to addiction/substance abuse, orphanhood, untreated mental illness and grief. Several adults drink, one to excess, and one scene that shows two people making out and one person refusing to go further because the other is too drunk to consent. Themes include teamwork and empathy, as well as the importance of found families. (102 minutes)

Available via various streaming platforms.

Greyhound (PG-13)

Streaming

Age 13+

Intense World War II combat in the Atlantic; brief language.

Greyhound” is a wartime drama starring Tom Hanks. It tells the story of a days-long battle between Nazi submarines and a convoy of Allied ships carrying essential arms and supplies across the Atlantic Ocean to England. The action is fierce and frequent. Suspense is high. Torpedoes, machine-gun fire and artillery hit their marks. Ships and U-boats catch fire and explode. The filmmakers have opted to register the loss of life on the faces of the mostly very young men who watch in fear and horror from a distance rather than those being injured and killed. Only one wounded sailor is shown; three flag-draped bodies are buried at sea. Language includes one instance each of “hell,” “d---” and “f---” (after which the offender immediately apologizes). The film makes a strong statement about the tragedy of war, as well as about integrity, teamwork, compassion and grace under fire. (91 minutes)

Available via Apple TV+ streaming.

Warrior Nun (TV-MA)

Streaming

Age 14+

Language, supernatural violence in fun comics-based mystery.

Warrior Nun” is a supernatural mystery series about a battle between good and evil, with a young woman named Ava (Alba Baptista) at the center of a chosen-one quest. Based on Ben Dunn’s comic-book series “Warrior Nun Areala,” it has lots of battle violence, plus deaths and gruesome injuries. That said, many of the weapons have a sci-fi look (giant guns, a glowing sword, etc.), and the wounds are often light on blood and have supernatural aspects. Ava is a powerful role model who frequently sacrifices herself for others and understands her place in her quest, even though it takes some time for her to understand her duties and obligations. The diverse cast is also mostly made up of young women. Sexual content includes romantic complications between Ava and a male character; expect them to kiss and date. Language includes “f---” and “s---.” Characters drink at parties, and — while at a club — Ava and her friends take an unnamed drug that seems to be psychedelic. Courage and teamwork are demonstrated in the show’s central quest. (10 roughly 45-minute episodes)

Available via Netflix streaming.

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