Bedouine

Good music should transport you, so it’s fitting that a faithful interpreter of this theory is Azniv Korkejian, who fashions songs as Bedouine. You could look at Korkejian’s nomadic life and find the inspiration for the name — she was born to Armenian parents in Syria, spent her childhood in Saudi Arabia and immigrated to America — but instead tune your ears toward the missives in her latest album, “Bird Songs of a Killjoy,” and join her on a journey. Korkejian’s songs are folk-inspired (the timbre of her voice can also evoke Brazilian bossa nova troubadours) and radiate a calming warmth that sends you closer toward bliss. Oct. 11 at 8 p.m. at Songbyrd. $15-$17 .

Wilco

Most bands can only dream of having as prolific and influential of a catalogue as Wilco. The Chicago-based sextet stormed out of the gate with a run of albums that concluded with 2001’s defining, experimental “Yankee Hotel Foxtrot,” but since then, the alt-rockers have been siloed by playing engaging but safe music that you wouldn’t be surprised to hear your dad blasting on a road trip. And you certainly wouldn’t expect after 25 years for the band to deliver one of its sharpest works yet with “Ode to Joy.” The group’s 11th album is a self-meditation on the harmonious folk elements that keep Wilco going and longtime fans coming back, but also revitalizes it in a way that will draw in new listeners and skeptics alike. Oct. 15 at 7:30 p.m. at the Anthem. Sold out.

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(Sandy) Alex G

Those attuned to the indie rock world have been able to set their watch to nearly annual releases from Alex G. The 26-year-old has shared a wealth of fuzzy rock tracks through different mediums, but they are all defined by his knack for concise melodies that have a tendency to loop in your head and his skillful guitar stylings. “House of Sugar,” from the musician born Alexander Giannascoli, might offer the most vivid and inviting entry point yet into the world of (Sandy) Alex G. Some of the songs are intentionally a little muddled to add mystery, but Giannascoli’s instrumentation and voice have never come through clearer to paint a portrait of one of the decade’s defining indie rock artists. Oct. 17 at 7:30 p.m. (doors) at Black Cat. $20-$25.

Pharaohe Monch

Having a seemingly endless amount of music to listen to with just a few taps is certainly nice and all, but anyone looking for the debut solo album of Pharoahe Monch, one of the finest underground rappers of the 1990s, has been out of luck. “Internal Affairs” has long been a rarity in the physical or streaming realm because of the booming single “Simon Says,” which was the subject of legal battles because of its sampling of music from the Godzilla movies. Starting Oct. 18, in celebration of the album’s 20th anniversary, fans and record collectors will be able to get their hands on Monch’s fiery opus. D.C. rapheads will get a bonus when the 46-year-old emcee comes to the Kennedy Center to talk about the making of “Internal Affairs” on Wednesday (7 p.m., $15) followed by a front-to-back performance of the album on Thursday. Oct. 17 at 7:30 p.m. at the Kennedy Center. $35.

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