Raheem DeVaughn

“If I stopped recording now and said I wouldn’t record for five years, I’ve got enough music for 10,” Raheem DeVaughn said earlier this year. “So I can’t wait, because I’m just warming up.” True to his word, the self-described Love King of R&B followed last year’s “Decade of a Love King” with June’s “The Love Reunion.” As he had throughout his years-long career, the D.C.-raised artist explores the intricacies of romantic entanglements in his silky smooth singing voice. And while firmly rooted in R&B classicism, a few new songs add Caribbean grooves to spice things up. Oct. 19 at 7 and 10:30 p.m. at City Winery. Sold out.

Swervedriver

Emerging in the early ’90s from the same Thames Valley region that spawned its fair share of shoegazers, Swervedriver was often looped into the ethereal genre, even though the Oxford act brought more muscle and heft to its alt-rock tunes than its peers. The band bowed out in 1998 but reemerged a few years ago, just as shoegaze acts My Bloody Valentine, Jesus and Mary Chain and Slowdive were getting back into the game. The pigeonholing has continued, but the two albums Swervedriver has released since reuniting are a reminder that the band did things its way. Oct. 19 at 9 p.m. at Rock and Roll Hotel. $22.50-$25.

Young Thug

Ever since Young Thug landed on the musical landscape like an alien visiting our planet, rap purists haven’t known what to make of the iconoclast with the chameleonic voice box and outré fashion sense. No matter: The 28-year-old ATLien has remained rap’s foremost pioneer, reshaping the whole scene in his own image. But despite a handful of instant-classic mix tapes, hip-hop heads handwringed about his ability to pull it all together on a proper album. Thug’s answer is “So Much Fun,” an hour-long exploration of what makes him so special: his effervescent, elastic vocals. “No time for gibberish,” he raps, “all the critics hearin’ this.” Oct. 22 at 8 p.m. at the Anthem. $50-$75.

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Nina Kraviz

Born in Siberia and based in Moscow, Russian DJ-producer-vocalist Nina Kraviz has spent much of the decade meandering across the house and techno spectrum. From Dance Mania-inspired bangers to acid techno to more ambient material, Kraviz delivers it all, whether on her records, in her sets or via her own label, трип (pronounced “trip”). She’s racked up accolades along the way, but also an undue amount of criticism — about the content of her sets, or where she shoots interviews — that often is aimed at women in a male-dominated electronic dance music world. Oct. 24 at 10 p.m. at U Street Music Hall. ustreetmusichall.com. $35-$40.

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