Jake Xerxes Fussell

Timelessness is a hard feeling to capture for any artist. That’s especially true for Jake Xerxes Fussell, whose knowledge and love of various eras of folksie American tunes appears to be encyclopedic, at minimum. The North Carolina-based troubadour’s own life seems like it could have been plucked out of one of his own songs: Fussell grew up traveling with his folklorist father across the Southeast and that helped inspire him to do graduate research on Choctaw fiddlers. On Fussell’s latest album, “Out of Sight,” he shows off his reverence for the past with interpretations of tunes that are nearly a century old. But he also adds his flourishes on those staples and his original compositions by forgoing the aged twang of an acoustic guitar for the modern clarity of the electric. Nov. 9 at 7 p.m. at Jammin Java. $20.

Lil Tecca

It’s not uncommon for teenagers to capture the ears of music fans of all ages, but it was still a little amusing to see that perhaps the only thing that shined brighter than Lil Tecca’s summer banger “Ransom” was the gleam of the braces wiring his teeth in the song’s music video. The 17-year-old rapper took to Instagram to blow up his song, which has now accumulated more than 168 million views on YouTube. The Long Island native worked with the producing duo Internet Money, whose beats launched the careers of Juice Wrld, among others, to fashion his infectious singsong flow. His debut album, “We Love You Tecca,” can be a little repetitive but flashes Tecca’s potential. Nov. 9 at 8 p.m. at the Fillmore Silver Spring. $20.

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Julia Jacklin

Julia Jacklin is not trying to cloak her feelings. The Australian singer pens koans that confront the storm of feelings that swirl around what it takes to fall in and out of love with someone. What’s remarkable about the 29-year-old’s tunes is how she tackles these issues with lucidity, especially on her latest album, “Crushing.” Press play on “Don’t Know How to Keep Loving You,” to hear Jacklin’s perspective not as a jilted partner, but as one who has gotten to the point in a relationship where being so intertwined feels as isolating as being alone. What resonates are Jacklin’s pleas to choose to balance love and anguish versus merely letting yourself dissolve and never feel anything at all. Nov. 10 at 7:30 p.m. (doors) at Black Cat. $20.

Black Midi

In this digital age in which we know if a musician sneezes, new artists aren’t supposed to spring up out of seemingly nowhere like Black Midi. The London quartet’s members are barely out of high school, yet they’ve already released a debut album (“Schlagenheim”) in line with the scattered ferocity of teenage boys and collaborated with Damo Suzuki, former frontman of the legendary experimental weirdos Can. But it’s easy to see why these tunes can sneak up on you. Frontman Geordie Greep’s hypnotically accented voice is an ideal bedrock for the alien guitar sounds and the deft beyond-his-years drumming of Morgan Simpson that propels the band to its own sonic dimension. Nov. 13 at 7 p.m. at U Street Music Hall. $18.

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