Electronic musician and scholar Tara Rodgers makes techno music under the name Analog Tara. (Photo from Tara Rodgers)

The most instantly satisfying thing about “Fundamentals” — the first saucer of vinyl that Tara Rodgers has released under her nom de techno, Analog Tara, in 15 years — is how balanced it feels. Top to bottom, this is well-crafted dance music — the kind that makes the floor feel sturdier beneath your feet while still allowing your head to get all-the-way loose.

Maybe that’s because Rodgers has spent the past two decades thinking hard about craft. She quite literally wrote the book on women in electronic music, 2010’s “Pink Noises,” and before that, she hosted the site pinknoises.com, a since-shuttered trove of Q&As with many of the field’s leading minds.

Since then, Rodgers has kept active in recording and in academia, quietly producing “homemade techno” in the shadows. “I like that electronic music is something I can do at home,” Rodgers says via email (her preferred mode of conversation when she’s giving the As instead of asking the Qs). “And then it takes on a life of its own out in the world.”

Which is to say, Rodgers hopes her music might motivate muscles and ventilate brains. “One of the themes I explored in ‘Fundamentals’ was how to achieve lightness and weight with sound design and mixing,” she writes. “So there may be a really heavy bass element that activates your body in some way, offset by something shimmering and ethereal. In recent years I’ve been interested in creating sonic atmospheres that can be really felt — across the body, and hopefully resonating in an emotional or imaginative space as well.

“Especially in the stark political times of the present moment, I have a lot of faith in music’s potential to help sustain and restore our capacity for feeling.”

Show: July 13 at 10 p.m. at Ten Tigers Parlour, 3813 Georgia Ave. NW. Free.