In D.C. Dream Day, we ask our favorite people in the area to tell us how they would spend a perfect day in the District. Find more Dream Days here.

During her years as a concert booker, Sasha Lord curated shows in some of D.C.’s most offbeat places. A prime example: Comet Ping Pong, where she transformed the Northwest pizza shop’s back game room into a sought-after music venue hosting up-and-coming regional and touring bands. Her sharp sensibilities eventually landed her a gig managing two venues in New York before she left the Big Apple — and the booking world — behind in April.

“I started doing production and I loved it,” says Lord, who now resides in Rosslyn. “I was really craving to get away from booking and being more behind the scenes and working more directly with artists.”

Now a production assistant at Warner Theatre, the 37-year-old helps manage logistics for many of the venue’s shows, which include book talks, comedy events and concerts. For her perfect day in the city, she would travel to some of the area’s hidden gems, and naturally, take in a concert.

I’d wake up and head to the Hirshhorn Museum and get a strong coffee buzz on at Dolcezza Coffee & Gelato. I’d have a coffee and walk around the sculpture garden. A good friend of mine, Betsy Johnson, a curator at the Hirshhorn, curated its recent acquisition called “Feel the Sun in Your Mouth.” It fills the museum’s lower level galleries with 25 works by artists from a dozen countries, and weaves together global perspectives on critical contemporary issues.

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My next stop would be the Arlington Art Truck , which is curated by Cynthia Connolly. I helped Cynthia this summer. The current installation is called “Ties that Bind: Learn to Sew on a Button and Connect” [by Lorenzo Cardim with artists Charlene Wallace and Angela Latson], and the mobile art truck goes to farmers markets, libraries and Arlington County events.

Everything is in the truck, and we take it out and set it up. Every single Arlington County civic association is outlined on a fabric hoop, and people come and sew buttons onto their civic associations. What’s so cool is that people are not just learning about civic associations, but it’s also teaching a skill that many people have forgotten, which is sewing on buttons.

Then I would trek to the Eden Center . It’s incredible — it really looks like Little Vietnam, but it’s a shopping center. They have tons of restaurants, but my favorite place to eat there is Rice Paper . You can actually make your own summer rolls at the table. They have everything from turmeric fish to lemongrass beef. Another favorite place [at Eden Center] is a holistic store called District Five .

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From there, my next trek would be to Little Korea in Annandale. My favorite place there is called Spa Riverside . It’s $20 and the Nordic-Russian in me totally craves a hot sauna. Women and men are separated, and they have a hot sauna, steam room and hot pool. So I get really hot in the sauna and then I jump into the ice cold plunge pool. I’ll also meditate in the salt cave room for like a [half-hour] after I’ve done the pools. It’s just so relaxing.

I would head back to the city for dinner and go to Buck’s Fishing & Camping , which is [next to] Comet Ping Pong. It’s basically [as] if [director] Wes Anderson did an American country movie set in a fine dining restaurant. It’s a neighborhood, independent-owned campground of a restaurant with the best variety of everything from great vegetarian food to the best steak ever. And it’s just so visually appealing: It’s all candlelit and has gorgeous plants everywhere. They have amazing paintings and the music is awesome. I would get either the steak or go totally vegetarian and get the amazing pilaf bowl.

I’d grab a tea and walk around the Kennedy Center’s roof, which has the best view of our beautiful city. Then, I’d go to the Reach — there’s an orchard of ginkgo trees and there are chairs underneath it where you can see the river, so sometimes I like to sit under the ginkgo trees. But what I like to do at the Kennedy Center is that any time you go there, at any hour, there’s beautiful art, or free music at the Millennium Stage, which is curated by Diana Ezerins. She’s a dear friend and I really respect her. I like to go with the flow on my days off — just show up and say, “Oh, there’s music here.”

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