This piece has been updated to reflect the final version of the tax bill.

The House and Senate are expected to pass a long-awaited tax bill by the middle of this week. Republicans claim the bill is meant to benefit the middle class, but lower– and middle–class taxpayers will receive moderate tax cuts. The wealthy, by contrast, get a massive windfall, and the corporate tax rate would nearly cut in half. The individual tax cuts are expected to lessen over time, since most related provisions expire at the end of 2025, but the rich still do much better than everyone else.

Enter how much you earn below to see how people like you are affected:

My household makes $
per year.

Under the Senate's plan, people like you (with incomes in the 20th to 40th percentile) would average a $330 tax cut in 2019.

85.4 percent of people like you would get a tax cut, and 5.1 percent would see a tax increase.

By contrast, people in the top 0.1 percent — those making over $3.6 million — would get a cut averaging $85,640.

How every income group is affected in 2019, compared to current law

Income Average tax change Share getting a cut or hike (or no change)
$0 to $25,400
-$60
53.9%
1.2%
$25,400 to $48,600
-$380
86.8%
4.6%
$48,600 to $86,100
-$930
91.3%
7.3%
$86,100 to $149,400
-$1,810
92.5%
7.3%
$149,400 to $216,800
-$2,970
92.3%
7.6%
$216,800 to $307,900
-$4,550
94.4%
5.5%
$307,900 to $732,800
-$13,480
97.3%
2.7%
Over $732,800
-$51,140
90.7%
9.3%
All taxpayers
-$1,610
80.4%
4.8%
Income Share getting a cut or hike (or no change)
$0 to $25,400
53.9%
1.2%
$25,400 to $48,600
86.8%
4.6%
$48,600 to $86,100
91.3%
7.3%
$86,100 to $149,400
92.5%
7.3%
$149,400 to $216,800
92.3%
7.6%
$216,800 to $307,900
94.4%
5.5%
$307,900 to $732,800
97.3%
2.7%
Over $732,800
90.7%
9.3%
All taxpayers
80.4%
4.8%

At the end of 2025, all the tax breaks for individuals and families will expire. In combination with tweaks to how inflation is calculated, this causes many low- and middle-income taxpayers to see a tax increase compared to current law. The cuts for corporations will not expire, and wealthy individual taxpayers will still save significant amounts of money, albeit less than in 2018.

How every income group is affected in 2027, compared to current law

Income Average tax change Share getting a cut or hike (or no change)
$0 to $28,100
+$30
11.1%
32.6%
$28,100 to $54,700
+$40
23.3%
57.7%
$54,700 to $93,200
+$20
24.4%
69.7%
$93,200 to $154,900
-$30
33.2%
64.2%
$154,900 to $225,400
-$100
38.1%
60.5%
$225,400 to $304,600
-$190
50.2%
48.7%
$304,600 to $912,100
-$1,010
58.0%
41.5%
Over $912,100
-$20,660
75.9%
23.8%
All taxpayers
-$160
25.2%
53.4%
Income Share getting a cut or hike (or no change)
$0 to $28,100
11.1%
32.6%
$28,100 to $54,700
23.3%
57.7%
$54,700 to $93,200
24.4%
69.7%
$93,200 to $154,900
33.2%
64.2%
$154,900 to $225,400
38.1%
60.5%
$225,400 to $304,600
50.2%
48.7%
$304,600 to $912,100
58.0%
41.5%
Over $912,100
75.9%
23.8%
All taxpayers
25.2%
53.4%

Highlighting in the 2027 chart is by income percentile. The TPC analysis accounts for the fact that people your current income percentile will have a higher average income by 2027.

Additional work by Kevin Uhrmacher.

About this story

Current tax plan data from the IRS via the Tax Policy Center.

Originally published Dec. 2, 2017.

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