After a white supremacist-led rally to keep a statue of Robert E. Lee in Charlottesville spun into deadly violence on Aug. 12, municipalities around the country began taking a closer look at Confederate monuments in their own backyards. Most of the country’s 700 or so of these memorials are in the South, but some are in places you wouldn’t expect. Click the state where you think each of these monuments is located.

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Matt Volz/AP

Where is this monument?

Even Montana has a Confederate monument, despite gaining statehood 24 years after the Civil War ended. The granite fountain in a Helena park was commissioned in 1916 as a tribute to fallen Confederate soldiers by a group of Southerners who had moved west. The fountain was renovated in 2008; on Aug. 16, the city commission ordered its removal in the wake of the violence in Charlottesville.

UPDATE: On Aug. 18, the fountain was dismantled and removed.

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2

Nicholas Pfosi/The Boston Globe/Getty Images

Where is this monument?

The only Confederate monument in Massachusetts is on Georges Island in Boston Harbor, a marker dedicated in 1963 to the 13 Confederate prisoners of war who died there. It has been boarded up since June as officials figure out what to do with it.

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3

John Raoux/AP

Where is this monument?

The “Johnny Reb" statue of a Confederate soldier was moved from a park in downtown Orlando to the Confederate veterans section of a nearby cemetery in summer 2017. It was dedicated in 1911 along Main Street by a chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy and was moved to the park in 1917. Florida had the smallest population of any Confederate state but was a key supplier of food to the troops.

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4

Angie Wang/AP

Where is this monument?

The most public of at least six Confederate memorials in Arizona is the Arizona Troops Memorial, erected in 1961 across from the state capitol in Phoenix. Part of the state was Confederate territory, and the westernmost Civil War battle, which involved 24 men, took place about an hour south of Phoenix at Picacho Pass. This memorial was vandalized with paint soon after Charlottesville, and a few days later, another monument about 45 minutes away was tarred and feathered.

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5

Mark Humphrey/AP

Where is this monument?

A 25-foot-tall tribute to Tennessee native Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest, a slave trader, noted military tactician and Ku Klux Klan grand wizard, was erected on private land but towers over a highway in Nashville. The statue has been controversial for its symbolism — and its garish, cartoonlike design — since it was unveiled in 1998.

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6

Where is this monument?

Baltimore quietly hauled away its Confederate memorials in the days after the deadly Charlottesville rally, but Maryland contains at least one more. Tucked away on the grounds of the Howard County courthouse in Ellicott City — the top is barely visible to the left of the courthouse from the street — is a monument dedicated in 1948 to Confederate veterans from the county.

UPDATE: Early on Aug. 22, this monument was removed from the courthouse grounds on the order of County Executive Allan Kittleman.

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7

Raymond Boyd/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Where is this monument?

Confederate Mound in Oak Woods Cemetery in Chicago marks a mass grave of about 4,200 Confederate prisoners from Camp Douglas, a major detention facility during the war. The towering monument was designed by the United Confederate Veterans, and President Grover Cleveland traveled to Illinois for the 1895 dedication ceremony. Inscribed on the base are the names of prisoners buried there who died, mostly from smallpox, other diseases and exposure to the harsh climate.

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8

Where is this monument?

Pennsylvania contains just two Confederate monuments, both in the town of McConnellsburg, according to Southern Poverty Law Center data. This one commemorates the last Confederate bivouac north of the Mason-Dixon Line, where 3,000 soliders led by Gen. Bradley T. Johnson camped after the burning of Chambersburg. The Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission and the Fulton County Historical Society erected the marker in conjunction with the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

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9

Robert Scheer/IndyStar

Where is this monument?

The U.S. government built this Indiana monument in 1912 to mark the graves of 1,616 Confederate soldiers and sailors who died of illness and starvation while imprisoned at a notorious Indianapolis prison camp. Among the names are 24 African American soldiers and the great-great-grandfather of former President Bill Clinton. The 35-foot monument was moved to its current location in Garfield Park in 1928, and the remains were moved aross town and placed under a new marker.

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10

Calla Kessler/The Washington Post

Where is this monument?

Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia was originally considered to be a Union cemetery, but its Confederate section contains 482 graves circling this symbol-laden monument. At its 1914 dedication, soldiers from both sides placed wreaths on the graves, a metaphor for the reconciliation between North and South. The figure at the top of the monument is a woman extending a laurel wreath toward the South. A frieze below her contains the coat of arms of each of the 13 Confederate states and Maryland, which supported the Confederacy but didn’t join it. Sculpted vignettes depict Southern life during wartime, including slavery. Sculptor Moses Ezekiel, himself a Confederate veteran, is buried at the monument’s base.

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Number of Confederate monuments by state

Confederate monuments were sprinkled around 31 states and the District of Columbia as of 2016, the most recent count by the Southern Poverty Law Center. Virginia, home to the Confederate Capitol of Richmond, had the most with 96. Many localities have removed monuments recently.

2-24

25-49

1

50 or more

ME

WI

VT

NH

WA

ID

MT

ND

MN

IL

MI

NY

MA

OR

NV

WY

SD

IA

IN

OH

PA

NJ

CT

RI

CA

UT

CO

NE

MO

KY

WV

VA

MD

DE

AZ

NM

KS

AR

TN

NC

SC

DC

OK

LA

MS

AL

GA

HI

AK

TX

FL

Source: Southern Poverty Law Center

1

2-24

25-49

50 or more

ME

WI

VT

NH

WA

ID

MT

ND

MN

IL

MI

NY

MA

OR

NV

WY

SD

IA

IN

OH

PA

NJ

CT

RI

CA

UT

CO

NE

MO

KY

WV

VA

MD

DE

AZ

NM

KS

AR

TN

NC

SC

DC

OK

LA

MS

AL

GA

HI

AK

TX

FL

Source: Southern Poverty Law Center

1

2-24

25-49

50 or more

ME

WI

VT

NH

WA

ID

MT

ND

MN

IL

MI

NY

MA

OR

NV

WY

SD

IA

IN

OH

PA

NJ

CT

RI

CA

UT

CO

NE

MO

KY

WV

VA

MD

DE

AZ

NM

KS

AR

TN

NC

SC

DC

OK

LA

MS

AL

GA

HI

AK

TX

FL

Source: Southern Poverty Law Center

When the Confederate monuments were dedicated in each state

Most monuments were dedicated before 1950, with the largest flurry occurring very early in the 20th century. There was another spike in dedications during the Civil Rights era. The newest monument was erected in Fredericksburg, Va., in 2014.

1

6

12 monuments

Civil War

Year not

available

1900

1950

2000

Va.

N.C.

Ga.

Tex.

S.C.

Ala.

Miss.

Tenn.

Ky.

La.

Ark.

Fla.

Mo.

W.Va.

Okla.

Md.

Iowa

Pa.

Kan.

Ind.

D.C.

Ariz.

Mont.

Mass.

Source: Southern Poverty Law Center

1

6

12 monuments

Year not

available

Civil War

1900

1950

2000

Va.

N.C.

Ga.

Texas dedicated 12

monuments in 1963

Tex.

S.C.

Ala.

Miss.

Tenn.

Ky.

La.

Mo.

Fla.

Mo.

W.Va.

Okla.

Md.

Iowa

Pa.

Kan.

Ind.

D.C.

Ariz.

Mont.

Mass.

Source: Southern Poverty Law Center

1

6

12 monuments

Year not

available

Civil War

1900

1950

2000

Virginia

North Carolina

Georgia

Texas dedicated 12

monuments in 1963

Texas

South Carolina

Alabama

Mississippi

Tennessee

Kentucky

Louisiana

Arkansas

Florida

Missouri

West Virginia

Oklahoma

Maryland

Iowa

Pennsylvania

Kansas

Indiana

District of Columbia

Arizona

Montana

Massachusetts

Source: Southern Poverty Law Center

About this project

Some photos have been edited to obscure the names of the state the monument resides in. Information sources: Southern Poverty Law Center, Helena Independent Record, Orlando Sentinel, Arizona Republic, WBUR.org, Indianapolis Star, Arlington National Cemetery, Baltimore Sun, HistoricalMarkerProject.com, National Park Service, Chicago Tribune

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