Republican leaders say they plan to vote on some kind of health-care bill Tuesday, but they're not sure what that legislation will look like. So our count is on hold. We'll resume it when Republicans announce what they'll be voting on.

Four GOP senators have indicated they oppose the new version of the bill and 10 others have expressed concerns with some form of the bill.*
If three vote against it, the bill would fail.

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Collins

Maine

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Lee

Utah

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Moran

Kan.

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Paul

Ky.

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Capito

W.Va.

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Cassidy

La.

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Corker

Tenn.

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Heller

Nev.

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Hoeven

N.D.

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Johnson

Wis.

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McCain

Ariz.

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Murkowski

Alaska

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Portman

Ohio

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Sasse

Neb.

* Excludes senators who expressed support after the July 13 changes.

Senate Republicans effort to rush their their new version of a health-care bill before the delayed August recess has flatlined. Assuming no Democrats vote for this bill (a safe assumption because it attempts to unravel Obamacare), Senate leaders can afford to lose only two Republican votes.. But several days after they unveiled a new version of a bill previously estimated to leave 22 million more people uninsured over the next decade, at least four Republicans said they can't vote for it. Here's a breakdown of what went wrong for Republicans' health-care bill.

[What the new Senate bill changes about Obamacare]

Among 52 GOP senators ...

50 votes are needed to pass

(Vice president would break a tie)

So only two

can defect

Among 52 GOP senators ...

50 votes are needed to pass

(Vice president would break a tie)

So only two

can defect

Who might vote no?

We’re tracking every Senator’s position on the bill. Below we take a look at some groups of Republicans who might have a reason to vote no, highlighting those who’ve said that they’re opposed and those who’ve said that they have concerns.

[The Senate bill’s changes won over some conservatives but offered little to moderates]

Senators from a state that expanded Medicaid

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Paul

Ky.

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Capito

W.Va.

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Cassidy

La.

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Heller

Nev.

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Hoeven

N.D.

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McCain

Ariz.

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Murkowski

Alaska

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Portman

Ohio

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Boozman

Ark.

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Cotton

Ark.

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Daines

Mont.

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Ernst

Iowa

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Flake

Ariz.

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Gardner

Colo.

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Grassley

Iowa

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Kennedy

La.

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McConnell

Ky.

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Sullivan

Alaska

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Toomey

Pa.

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Young

Ind.

Thirty-one states have expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, and although many red states have declined to do so, these senators represent states that decided to expand. The program extends health benefits to Americans under 65 with incomes up to 133 percent of the federal poverty level, and is funded almost entirely by the federal government.

States that saw big drop in uninsured

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Collins

Maine

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Paul

Ky.

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Capito

W.Va.

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Heller

Nev.

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Portman

Ohio

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Barrasso

Wyo.

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Boozman

Ark.

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Cotton

Ark.

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Daines

Mont.

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Enzi

Wyo.

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Ernst

Iowa

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Grassley

Iowa

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McConnell

Ky.

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Toomey

Pa.

The main goal of the ACA was to reduce the number of Americans without insurance. These senators are from states that saw the biggest decline in their uninsured populations, with drops of at least 33 percent from 2013 to 2015.

[Republicans who decried Obamacare secrecy now writing legislation in secret]

Least conservative

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Collins

Maine

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Capito

W.Va.

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Murkowski

Alaska

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Cochran

Miss.

Most conservative

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Lee

Utah

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Paul

Ky.

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Sasse

Neb.

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Cruz

Tex.

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Flake

Ariz.

There is opposition to the bill on both sides of the Republican ideological spectrum (more on how we categorized the lawmakers here). Relatively moderate senators are cautious about taking drastic measure to roll back Obamacare. Some of the most conservative senators are concerned that this bill may not go far enough.

Up for reelection in 2018

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Corker

Tenn.

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Heller

Nev.

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Barrasso

Wyo.

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Cruz

Tex.

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Fischer

Neb.

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Flake

Ariz.

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Hatch

Utah

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Wicker

Miss.

In whatever form it takes, the Senate bill is expected to be unpopular. That makes it a riskier “yes” vote for senators who will be up for reelection in 2018, such as Dean Heller from the battleground state of Nevada. Standing alongside Nevada's GOP governor, who expanded Medicaid under Obamacare, Heller forcefully opposed the first version of the health-care bill, saying: "I cannot support a piece of legislation that takes away insurance from tens of millions of Americans and hundreds of thousands of Nevadans."

There are even concerns about the process of crafting the bill among the “working group” of 13 Republican senators who were supposedly writing it. Sen. Mike Lee (Utah), one of those 13, posted a video Tuesday expressing his frustration at not having seen legislation yet, and others have publicly expressed concerns about the bill.

[Revised Senate health-care bill still lacks the votes to pass]

Part of the bill’s “working group”

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Lee

Utah

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Portman

Ohio

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Alexander

Tenn.

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Barrasso

Wyo.

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Cornyn

Tex.

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Cotton

Ark.

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Cruz

Tex.

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Enzi

Wyo.

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Gardner

Colo.

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Hatch

Utah

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McConnell

Ky.

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Thune

S.D.

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Toomey

Pa.

Here’s a continuously updated list of where Republican senators stand on the current bill. Click on the plus sign to read why they took that position. Did we miss something? Let us know!

Where GOP senators stand:

In bold are the senators who said they are inclined to vote against a key procedural vote. Three "no" votes would kill the bill before it even got to an official vote.

Susan  Collins (Maine)
Mike  Lee (Utah)
Jerry  Moran (Kan.)
Rand  Paul (Ky.)

Oppose the bill 4

These senators have said they will or are likely to vote against the current bill. Republicans can afford only two GOP "no" votes.

Susan Collins (Maine)

Collins tweeted: “Still deep cuts to Medicaid in Senate bill. Will vote no on MTP. Ready to work w/ GOP & Dem colleagues to fix flaws in ACA.” Read more »

Mike Lee (Utah)

Lee said in a July 17th statement: "After conferring with trusted experts regarding the latest version of the Consumer Freedom Amendment, I have decided I cannot support the current version of the Better Care Reconciliation Act. “In addition to not repealing all of the Obamacare taxes, it doesn’t go far enough in lowering premiums for middle class families; nor does it create enough free space from the most costly Obamacare regulations.” Read more »

Jerry Moran (Kan.)

"There are serious problems with Obamacare, and my goal remains what it has been for a long time: to repeal and replace it," he said in a statement July 17. "This closed-door process has yielded the BCRA, which fails to repeal the Affordable Care Act or address healthcare’s rising costs. For the same reasons I could not support the previous version of this bill, I cannot support this one." Read more »

Rand Paul (Ky.)

Paul blasted the bill in a Washington Examiner Op-Ed, saying it “does little to nothing to repeal Obamacare of fix our ailing healthcare sector.” Read more »

Shelley Moore  Capito (W.Va.)
Bill  Cassidy (La.)
Bob  Corker (Tenn.)
Dean  Heller (Nev.)
John  Hoeven (N.D.)
Ron  Johnson (Wis.)
John  McCain (Ariz.)
Lisa  Murkowski (Alaska)
Rob  Portman (Ohio)
Ben  Sasse (Neb.)

Have concerns 10

These senators are considering voting against the bill unless their concerns get addressed, or they clearly expressed opposition to the first version of the bill and haven't changed their position yet.

Shelley Moore Capito (W.Va.)

Capito said in a July 13 statement that she continues “to have serious concerns about the Medicaid provisions” of the bill. She opposed the previous bill, saying “I'm not going to drop you off a cliff, and in my view, the Senate bill was too much of a cliff." Read more »

Bill Cassidy (La.)

Cassidy unveiled a separate health-care plan with Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.). He had concerns with the previous bill. He said, “there are things in this bill that adversely affect my state, that are peculiar to my state. A couple of the things I am concerned about, but if those can be addressed I will. And if they can't be addressed, I won't. So right now I am undecided.” Read more »

Bob Corker (Tenn.)

Corker said he will support the motion to proceed, but he had concerns about the previous bill. Corker said the previous bill “still doesn’t solve the problem low-income citizens across our state have. This bill, still places a bigger burden on them than they had before and a burden that they’re really not able to overcome.” Read more »

Dean Heller (Nev.)

Heller told NBC that he is undecided on whether to vote to advance the new bill. He was one of the most vocal opponents of the previous bill, saying at a Las Vegas news conference June 23 that it "is not the answer. It's simply not the answer. And I'm announcing today that, in this form, I will not support it. Standing alongside Nevada's popular GOP governor, who expanded Medicaid under Obamacare, Heller said the bill would pull the rug out on some of Nevada's most vulnerable people, like Medicaid recipients: "I cannot support a piece of legislation that takes away the insurance from tens of thousands of Nevadans." Read more »

John Hoeven (N.D.)
Ron Johnson (Wis.)

"I am concerned about Leader McConnell's comments to apparently some of my Republican colleagues — 'Don't worry about some of the Medicaid reforms, those are scheduled so far in the future they'll never take effect,'" the conservative senator, who wants to roll back Medicaid, told the GreenBay Press Gazette in an interview published July 14. "I've got to confirm those comments ... I think those comments are going to really put the motion to proceed in jeopardy, whether it's on my part or others." Read more »

John McCain (Ariz.)

McCain said in a July 13 statement that the revised bill “does not include the measures I have been advocating for on behalf of the people of Arizona.” He said he plans to file amendments regarding the bill’s impact on Arizona’s Medicaid system. “This is not what the American people expect of us, and it’s not what they deserve,” he said. Read more »

Lisa Murkowski (Alaska)

The moderate senator said in a Facebook town hall "there were some good things that came out of [Obamacare]," like protecting coverage for young adults and people with preexisting conditions as well as expanding Medicaid. “It's no secret that healthcare needs to be reformed, but it needs to be done right,” she said in a June 22 statement. Read more »

Rob Portman (Ohio)

Portman said, “I'm in the same position I've been in. Looking at the language and looking forward to the analysis.” He was concerned with the previous bill, saying in a June 27 statement, “I continue to have real concerns about the Medicaid policies in this bill, especially those that impact drug treatment at a time when Ohio is facing an opioid epidemic.” Read more »

Ben Sasse (Neb.)

Sasse was concerned with the previous bill: "Conservative Nebraskans have lots of reasons to be frustrated: This bill is not a full repeal; this bill is not a full replace; what this bill is is mostly just a Medicaid reform package,” he said in a statement to the Omaha World-Herald on June 27. “Nebraskans are dissatisfied with it and so am I.” Read more »

John  Barrasso (Wyo.)
John  Boozman (Ark.)
Thad  Cochran (Miss.)
Tom  Cotton (Ark.)
Steve  Daines (Mont.)
Joni  Ernst (Iowa)
Deb  Fischer (Neb.)
Jeff  Flake (Ariz.)
Cory  Gardner (Colo.)
Lindsey O.  Graham (S.C.)
Charles E.  Grassley (Iowa)
James M.  Inhofe (Okla.)
Johnny  Isakson (Ga.)
John Neely  Kennedy (La.)
James  Lankford (Okla.)
James E.  Risch (Idaho)
Marco  Rubio (Fla.)
Dan  Sullivan (Alaska)
Todd C.  Young (Ind.)

Unknown/unclear 19

These senators haven't commented on the bill or have given vague statements.

John Barrasso (Wyo.)
John Boozman (Ark.)
Thad Cochran (Miss.)
Tom Cotton (Ark.)
Steve Daines (Mont.)
Joni Ernst (Iowa)
Deb Fischer (Neb.)
Jeff Flake (Ariz.)
Cory Gardner (Colo.)
Lindsey O. Graham (S.C.)

Graham said he would support the motion to procced but wants changes to the bill so that it would win the support of Republican governors. He unveiled a separate health-care plan with Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-La.).

Charles E. Grassley (Iowa)
James M. Inhofe (Okla.)
Johnny Isakson (Ga.)
John Neely Kennedy (La.)

Kennedy and Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-La.) released a joint statement July 13 that said the bill “corrects a funding issue that would have treated Louisiana unfairly compared to other states.” Read more »

James Lankford (Okla.)

“I have started analyzing the revised draft bill to determine its benefits for Oklahomans,” Lankford said in a July 13 statement. Read more »

James E. Risch (Idaho)
Marco Rubio (Fla.)
Dan Sullivan (Alaska)
Todd C. Young (Ind.)
Lamar  Alexander (Tenn.)
Roy  Blunt (Mo.)
Richard  Burr (N.C.)
John  Cornyn (Tex.)
Mike  Crapo (Idaho)
Ted  Cruz (Tex.)
Mike  Enzi (Wyo.)
Orrin G.  Hatch (Utah)
Mitch  McConnell (Ky.)
David  Perdue (Ga.)
Pat  Roberts (Kan.)
Mike  Rounds (S.D.)
Tim  Scott (S.C.)
Richard C.  Shelby (Ala.)
Luther  Strange (Ala.)
John  Thune (S.D.)
Thom  Tillis (N.C.)
Patrick J.  Toomey (Pa.)
Roger  Wicker (Miss.)

Support the bill 19

These senators have said they will or are likely to vote for the bill.

Lamar Alexander (Tenn.)

Alexander said in a July 13 statement that the revised bill takes care of his main concerns but that he will continue to review the draft. Read more »

Roy Blunt (Mo.)
Richard Burr (N.C.)
John Cornyn (Tex.)

“We can let Obamacare continue to harm millions of families and small businesses, or we can help deliver better care that's more affordable without government mandates,” Cornyn said in a July 13 statement. Read more »

Mike Crapo (Idaho)
Ted Cruz (Tex.)
Mike Enzi (Wyo.)

“The journey to a better American health care system begins here,” Enzi said in a July 13 statement. Read more »

Orrin G. Hatch (Utah)

Hatch said on the Senate floor that “this legislation, while far from perfect, would fulfill the vast majority” of promises Republicans have made to their constituents regarding health care. Read more »

Mitch McConnell (Ky.)

The Senate Majority Leader largely authored the bill in secret with his aides, taking into account input with GOP senators. Read more »

David Perdue (Ga.)

Perdue told Bloomberg TV that he thinks the bill is “getting very, very close.” Read more »

Pat Roberts (Kan.)

“I look forward to continued improvement of the bill and am confident Kansas will continue to fare better under BCRA than Obamacare,” Roberts said in a July 13 statement. Read more »

Mike Rounds (S.D.)
Tim Scott (S.C.)
Richard C. Shelby (Ala.)
Luther Strange (Ala.)

“I'm in the conservative camp, so I like what I've seen,” Luther told Fox Business on July 13. Read more »

John Thune (S.D.)
Thom Tillis (N.C.)

Tillis said in a July 13 statement that the revised bill is an improvement. “I hope my colleagues will join me in supporting the motion to proceed so we can begin this robust, bipartisan amendment process,” he said. Read more »

Patrick J. Toomey (Pa.)

“The revised draft Senate health care bill prevent's Obamacare's imminent collapse,” Toomey said in a July 13 statement. Read more »

Roger Wicker (Miss.)

“This draft legislation takes a smaller government approach,” Wicker said in a July 13 statement. Read more »

Benjamin Din and Kim Soffen contributed to this report.

About this story

Stances on the bill are sourced from lawmaker statements and news reports. Did we miss something? Let us know!

Uninsured rate change was calculated based on data from the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Ideology is based on the first dimension of a measure called DW-Nominate, which scores each lawmaker's voting record between -1 (most liberal) and 1 (most conservative). The most moderate Republicans listed have an ideology score of less than 0.3, while the most conservative have a score of more than 0.8.

Legislator images via Government Printing Office.

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