Four GOP senators have indicated opposition to the bill.
Two others have expressed concerns with the bill.
If three vote against it, the bill would fail.

official photo

Collins

Maine

official photo

Cruz

Tex.

official photo

McCain

Ariz.

official photo

Paul

Ky.

official photo

Lee

Utah

official photo

Murkowski

Alaska

Jump to full table

Senate Republicans are hurtling toward a last-ditch health-care vote sometime this week, but they almost certainly don't have the votes to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. Sens. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) and John McCain (R-Ariz.) are firm “no” votes, with Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) saying Sunday he's opposed to the bill "right now." Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) said she's strongly leaning against the bill, and other opposition is piling up.

The bill in question, the Cassidy-Graham plan, would dissolve ACA marketplaces, slash Medicaid funding and give almost all of the federal money propping up Obamacare to states to create health programs as they wish. Those grants would grow slowly and disappear within a decade. It also would allow states to waive many ACA regulations, such as those that prohibit penalizing people with preexisting conditions. In short, it would get rid of Obamacare and much of the federal government's role in health care.

Time is running out, too. The vote needs to occur before Sept. 30, the last day of the 2017 fiscal year. After that, Republicans won’t be able to use budget reconciliation, a special Senate procedure that allows them to pass the bill with only 50 votes rather than the usual 60.

Who might vote no?

We’re tracking every senator’s position on the bill. Assuming no Democrats vote for it, Senate leaders can afford to lose only two Republican votes. The Senate’s previous health-care bill — the “skinny repeal” — fell one vote short of passing with three Republican no votes: Sens. Susan Collins (R-Maine), Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) and John McCain (R-Ariz.). Below we take a look at some groups of Republicans who might have a reason to vote no, highlighting those who have said that they are opposed and those who have said that they have concerns. The other senators either support the bill or are undecided or unknown.

Senators from states expected to lose funding under the plan

official photo

Barrasso

Wyo.

official photo

Boozman

Ark.

official photo

Burr

N.C.

official photo

Capito

W.Va.

official photo

Cassidy

La.

official photo

Collins

Maine

official photo

Cotton

Ark.

official photo

Daines

Mont.

official photo

Enzi

Wyo.

official photo

Fischer

Neb.

official photo

Flake

Ariz.

official photo

Gardner

Colo.

official photo

Heller

Nev.

official photo

Hoeven

N.D.

official photo

Kennedy

La.

official photo

McCain

Ariz.

official photo

McConnell

Ky.

official photo

Murkowski

Alaska

official photo

Paul

Ky.

official photo

Portman

Ohio

official photo

Rubio

Fla.

official photo

Sasse

Neb.

official photo

Sullivan

Alaska

official photo

Tillis

N.C.

official photo

Toomey

Pa.

official photo

Young

Ind.

Thirty-five states are expected to lose funding by 2026 under Cassidy-Graham according to an analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation. These states are generally those whose ACA implementation has been most robust and successful: Many expanded Medicaid and aggressively signed people up for the exchanges, meaning they get more money from the federal government. And the more money they’re getting now, the more they may lose under this legislation.

Least conservative

official photo

Capito

W.Va.

official photo

Cochran

Miss.

official photo

Collins

Maine

official photo

Murkowski

Alaska

Most conservative

official photo

Cruz

Tex.

official photo

Flake

Ariz.

official photo

Lee

Utah

official photo

Paul

Ky.

official photo

Sasse

Neb.

There is opposition to the bill on both sides of the Republican ideological spectrum (more on how we categorized the lawmakers here). Relatively moderate senators are cautious about taking drastic measure to roll back Obamacare. Some of the most conservative senators are concerned that this bill may not go far enough.

Up for reelection in 2018

official photo

Barrasso

Wyo.

official photo

Corker

Tenn.

official photo

Cruz

Tex.

official photo

Fischer

Neb.

official photo

Flake

Ariz.

official photo

Hatch

Utah

official photo

Heller

Nev.

official photo

Wicker

Miss.

In whatever form it takes, the Senate bill is expected to be unpopular. That makes it a riskier yes vote for senators who will be up for reelection in 2018, such as Republican Dean Heller, from the battleground state of Nevada, who is co-sponsoring the new bill.

Here’s a continuously updated list of where Republican senators stand on the current bill. Click on the lawmaker to read why he or she took that position. Did we miss something? Let us know!

Where senators stand

Republican
Updated
Changed position
GSState’s governor supports the bill
GOGovernor opposes the bill

Oppose the bill 4

Have concerns 2

Unknown/unclear 22

Support the bill 24

These senators have said they will or are likely to vote against the current bill. Republicans can afford only two GOP no votes.

These senators are considering voting against the bill unless their concerns get addressed.

These senators have not commented on the bill or have given vague statements.

These senators have said they will or are likely to vote for the bill.

2 updates
Ted Cruz (Tex.)

“Right now, they don’t have my vote,” Cruz said on Sept. 24. Read more »

Rand Paul (Ky.)GS

Paul says the bill effectively keeps the ACA but gives states more power, so it doesn't constitute a "repeal." His spokesman said Monday he opposes a revised version that gives more money to moderate states. Read more »

Susan Collins (Maine)GS

"Sweeping reforms to our health care system and to Medicaid can’t be done well in a compressed time frame, especially when the actual bill is a moving target. Today, we find out that there is now a fourth version of the Graham-Cassidy proposal, which is as deeply flawed as the previous iterations." Collins told the Portland Press Herald. Read more »

John McCain (Ariz.)GS

McCain told reporters “I cannot in good conscience vote for the Graham-Cassidy proposal" Read more »

1 update
Mike Lee (Utah)GS

After Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) said he doesn't think the bill "right now" has his or Lee's support, a Lee spokesperson told The Post: "We want some technical changes. We are working with Cassidy, but we haven’t committed to anything yet.” Read more »

Lisa Murkowski (Alaska)GO

Murkowski told reporters that she wants to see how much funding Alaska and other states would get before making a decision. She told reporters Wednesday she wasn't ready to support it even after meeting the bill's authors. Read more »

John Boozman (Ark.)GS
Shelley Moore Capito (W.Va.)

Capito told reporters she was waiting to see how much funding West Virginia gets. Read more »

Thad Cochran (Miss.)GS
Mike Crapo (Idaho)
Mike Enzi (Wyo.)
Joni Ernst (Iowa)GS
Deb Fischer (Neb.)GS
Cory Gardner (Colo.)GO

Gardner is waiting for more information on the bill. Read more »

Orrin G. Hatch (Utah)GS
Johnny Isakson (Ga.)
James Lankford (Okla.)GS
Jerry Moran (Kan.)GS

Moran's staff told a Roll Call reporter that he's having discussions with Kansans and senators about the bill. Read more »

David Perdue (Ga.)

Perdue says he wants to see a Congressional Budget Office report before voting. Read more »

Rob Portman (Ohio)GO

Reporters say Portman feels positive about the bill but is still looking over it. Read more »

James E. Risch (Idaho)
Marco Rubio (Fla.)

Rubio said he wanted to get more details before deciding. Read more »

Ben Sasse (Neb.)GS
Luther Strange (Ala.)

Strange told reporters, "We’re still looking at the details on how it affects Alabama, so we haven’t taken a position on it yet." Read more »

Thom Tillis (N.C.)GO
Patrick J. Toomey (Pa.)GO

Toomey says he's still reading the bill. Read more »

Roger Wicker (Miss.)GS
Todd C. Young (Ind.)GS

Young told reporters he's "still thinking about it." Read more »

Lamar Alexander (Tenn.)GS

Alexander told a local paper, "I would like to vote for Graham-Cassidy because I like block grants and it appears to be good for Tennessee." Read more »

John Barrasso (Wyo.)

Barrasso has been defending the bill on television. Read more »

Roy Blunt (Mo.)GS

Blunt tweeted that the bill would make care more affordable. Read more »

Richard Burr (N.C.)GO

Burr told a local radio station he supports the bill. Read more »

Bill Cassidy (La.)GO

Cassidy is one of the co-sponsors of the bill. Read more »

Bob Corker (Tenn.)GS

Corker told a local paper, "I am very encouraged by the fact that the Graham-Cassidy legislation repeals the core elements of Obamacare." Read more »

John Cornyn (Tex.)

As Senate majority whip, Cornyn is trying to whip enough votes to pass the bill. Read more »

Tom Cotton (Ark.)GS

Cotton told reporters he plans to vote for the bill Read more »

Steve Daines (Mont.)GO

Daines told reporters he thinks the bill would be good for Montana. Read more »

Jeff Flake (Ariz.)GS

Flake announced his support on Twitter on Sept. 17. Read more »

Lindsey O. Graham (S.C.)

Graham is a co-sponsor of the bill. Read more »

Charles E. Grassley (Iowa)GS

Grassley told a reporter "you have a responsibility to carry out what you said in the campaign." Read more »

Dean Heller (Nev.)GO

Heller is one of the co-sponsors of the bill. Read more »

John Hoeven (N.D.)GS

Hoeven told reporters he would support the bill since his state would get more money. Read more »

James M. Inhofe (Okla.)GS

He told reporters he supported the bill because "as a general rule the states do things better than the federal government." Read more »

Ron Johnson (Wis.)GS

Johnson is one of the co-sponsors of the bill. Read more »

John Neely Kennedy (La.)GO

Kennedy told reporters he'll support the bill, but also offer some amendments to it. Read more »

Mitch McConnell (Ky.)GS

As Senate majority Leader, McConnell is trying to whip enough votes to pass the bill. Read more »

Pat Roberts (Kan.)GS

Roberts said "something's better than nothing." Read more »

Mike Rounds (S.D.)GS

Rounds told reporters he supports the bill. Read more »

Tim Scott (S.C.)

Scott told a local paper "To try to dictate health care policy from Washington, D.C., simply does not make sense." Read more »

Richard C. Shelby (Ala.)

Shelby told reporters "This is what a lot of us ran on — we’ve been advocating it for years. Let the states run it." Read more »

Dan Sullivan (Alaska)GO

Sullivan has been meeting with Murkowski to try to earn her support. Read more »

John Thune (S.D.)GS

Thune is a member of Republican leadership and commended the bill for essentailly coming back from the dead. Read more »

Oppose the bill 4

Have concerns 2

Unknown/unclear 22

Support the bill 24

Scroll to see a full list of names

Oppose the bill 4

These senators have said they will or are likely to vote against the current bill. Republicans can afford only two GOP no votes.

2 updates
Ted Cruz (Tex.)

“Right now, they don’t have my vote,” Cruz said on Sept. 24. Read more »

Rand Paul (Ky.)GS

Paul says the bill effectively keeps the ACA but gives states more power, so it doesn't constitute a "repeal." His spokesman said Monday he opposes a revised version that gives more money to moderate states. Read more »

Susan Collins (Maine)GS

"Sweeping reforms to our health care system and to Medicaid can’t be done well in a compressed time frame, especially when the actual bill is a moving target. Today, we find out that there is now a fourth version of the Graham-Cassidy proposal, which is as deeply flawed as the previous iterations." Collins told the Portland Press Herald. Read more »

John McCain (Ariz.)GS

McCain told reporters “I cannot in good conscience vote for the Graham-Cassidy proposal" Read more »

Have concerns 2

These senators are considering voting against the bill unless their concerns get addressed.

1 update
Mike Lee (Utah)GS

After Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) said he doesn't think the bill "right now" has his or Lee's support, a Lee spokesperson told The Post: "We want some technical changes. We are working with Cassidy, but we haven’t committed to anything yet.” Read more »

Lisa Murkowski (Alaska)GO

Murkowski told reporters that she wants to see how much funding Alaska and other states would get before making a decision. She told reporters Wednesday she wasn't ready to support it even after meeting the bill's authors. Read more »

Unknown/unclear 22

These senators have not commented on the bill or have given vague statements.

John Boozman (Ark.)GS
Shelley Moore Capito (W.Va.)

Capito told reporters she was waiting to see how much funding West Virginia gets. Read more »

Thad Cochran (Miss.)GS
Mike Crapo (Idaho)
Mike Enzi (Wyo.)
Joni Ernst (Iowa)GS
Deb Fischer (Neb.)GS
Cory Gardner (Colo.)GO

Gardner is waiting for more information on the bill. Read more »

Orrin G. Hatch (Utah)GS
Johnny Isakson (Ga.)
James Lankford (Okla.)GS
Jerry Moran (Kan.)GS

Moran's staff told a Roll Call reporter that he's having discussions with Kansans and senators about the bill. Read more »

David Perdue (Ga.)

Perdue says he wants to see a Congressional Budget Office report before voting. Read more »

Rob Portman (Ohio)GO

Reporters say Portman feels positive about the bill but is still looking over it. Read more »

James E. Risch (Idaho)
Marco Rubio (Fla.)

Rubio said he wanted to get more details before deciding. Read more »

Ben Sasse (Neb.)GS
Luther Strange (Ala.)

Strange told reporters, "We’re still looking at the details on how it affects Alabama, so we haven’t taken a position on it yet." Read more »

Thom Tillis (N.C.)GO
Patrick J. Toomey (Pa.)GO

Toomey says he's still reading the bill. Read more »

Roger Wicker (Miss.)GS
Todd C. Young (Ind.)GS

Young told reporters he's "still thinking about it." Read more »

Support the bill 24

These senators have said they will or are likely to vote for the bill.

Lamar Alexander (Tenn.)GS

Alexander told a local paper, "I would like to vote for Graham-Cassidy because I like block grants and it appears to be good for Tennessee." Read more »

John Barrasso (Wyo.)

Barrasso has been defending the bill on television. Read more »

Roy Blunt (Mo.)GS

Blunt tweeted that the bill would make care more affordable. Read more »

Richard Burr (N.C.)GO

Burr told a local radio station he supports the bill. Read more »

Bill Cassidy (La.)GO

Cassidy is one of the co-sponsors of the bill. Read more »

Bob Corker (Tenn.)GS

Corker told a local paper, "I am very encouraged by the fact that the Graham-Cassidy legislation repeals the core elements of Obamacare." Read more »

John Cornyn (Tex.)

As Senate majority whip, Cornyn is trying to whip enough votes to pass the bill. Read more »

Tom Cotton (Ark.)GS

Cotton told reporters he plans to vote for the bill Read more »

Steve Daines (Mont.)GO

Daines told reporters he thinks the bill would be good for Montana. Read more »

Jeff Flake (Ariz.)GS

Flake announced his support on Twitter on Sept. 17. Read more »

Lindsey O. Graham (S.C.)

Graham is a co-sponsor of the bill. Read more »

Charles E. Grassley (Iowa)GS

Grassley told a reporter "you have a responsibility to carry out what you said in the campaign." Read more »

Dean Heller (Nev.)GO

Heller is one of the co-sponsors of the bill. Read more »

John Hoeven (N.D.)GS

Hoeven told reporters he would support the bill since his state would get more money. Read more »

James M. Inhofe (Okla.)GS

He told reporters he supported the bill because "as a general rule the states do things better than the federal government." Read more »

Ron Johnson (Wis.)GS

Johnson is one of the co-sponsors of the bill. Read more »

John Neely Kennedy (La.)GO

Kennedy told reporters he'll support the bill, but also offer some amendments to it. Read more »

Mitch McConnell (Ky.)GS

As Senate majority Leader, McConnell is trying to whip enough votes to pass the bill. Read more »

Pat Roberts (Kan.)GS

Roberts said "something's better than nothing." Read more »

Mike Rounds (S.D.)GS

Rounds told reporters he supports the bill. Read more »

Tim Scott (S.C.)

Scott told a local paper "To try to dictate health care policy from Washington, D.C., simply does not make sense." Read more »

Richard C. Shelby (Ala.)

Shelby told reporters "This is what a lot of us ran on — we’ve been advocating it for years. Let the states run it." Read more »

Dan Sullivan (Alaska)GO

Sullivan has been meeting with Murkowski to try to earn her support. Read more »

John Thune (S.D.)GS

Thune is a member of Republican leadership and commended the bill for essentailly coming back from the dead. Read more »

Additional design and development by Emily Yount and Kevin Uhrmacher.

About this story

Stances on the bill are sourced from lawmaker statements and news reports. Did we miss something? Let us know!

Legislator images via Government Printing Office.

Originally published Sept. 19, 2017.

Most Read