CONSERVATIVES

MODERATES

Some concerns the new

bill tried to address ...

Didn't repeal Obamacare

fully enough

Did not do enough

to fight the opioid crisis

Affected Alaska

too severely

Not directly

addressed*

Opposed to/concerned

with original bill

Paul

Collins

(Still opposed)

(Still opposed)

Still reading

the new bill

Lee

Portman

Capito

Heller

Murkowski

In favor of

the new bill

Johnson

Cruz

* The bill did not address Collins’ concerns about Planned Parenthood funding and other policies.

CONSERVATIVES

Some concerns the new

bill tried to address ...

Didn't repeal Obamacare

fully enough

Opposed to/concerned

with original bill

Paul

(Still opposed)

Still reading

the new bill

Lee

In favor of

the new bill

Johnson

Cruz

MODERATES

Did not do enough

to fight the opioid crisis

Affected Alaska

too severely

Not directly

addressed*

Opposed to/concerned

with original bill

Collins

(Still opposed)

Still reading

the new bill

Heller

Portman

Capito

Murkowski

In favor of

the new bill

* The bill did not address Collins’ concerns about Planned Parenthood

funding and other policies.

Senate Republican leaders unveiled a new version of their health-care bill Thursday after the first version failed to get enough support. The bill takes major steps to roll back provisions of the Affordable Care Act, with spending cuts to Medicaid and marketplace subsidies funding a substantial tax cut for the health-care industry.

Senate leadership can only afford two no votes from the GOP, but many Republican senators opposed or expressed concern about the previous version of the bill.

[What the Senate bill changes about Obamacare]

Loosening insurance regulations attracted some conservatives

Opposed to/concerned with original bill

Paul

(Still opposed)

Still reading

the new bill

Lee

Johnson

Cruz

In favor of

the new bill

Opposed to/concerned

with original bill

Paul

(Still opposed)

Still reading

the new bill

Lee

In favor of

the new bill

Johnson

Cruz

The biggest change to the bill, pushed by Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.), allows insurance companies to offer bare-bones health-care plans and charge sicker people more than healthy people, as long as they also offer at least one plan that complies with the ACA’s standards. This change moves the bill to the right in an attempt to sway conservative votes.

[Revised Senate health-care bill still lacks the votes to pass]

Opioid money may not woo senators from the most afflicted states

Opposed to/concerned with original bill

Still reading the new bill

Portman

Capito

Heller

In favor of the new bill

Opposed to/concerned

with original bill

Still reading

the new bill

Portman

Capito

Heller

In favor of

the new bill

The bill also allocated an additional $45 billion to combat the opioid crisis, which has hit especially hard in states such as West Virginia, home to Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (R). Capito, as well as Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio) and Sen. Dean Heller (R-Nev.) cited the lack of opioid funding as one of the reasons they objected to the previous bill, alongside its steep Medicaid cuts.

Additional funding for Alaska

Opposed to/concerned with original bill

Still reading the new bill

In favor of the new bill

Opposed to/concerned

with original bill

Still reading

the new bill

Murkowski

In favor of

the new bill

A provision was added to give Alaska $1.3 billion in additional funding to keep its insurance markets stable. The state would have been hit especially hard by the previous version of the bill, since its health-care costs are significantly higher than other states’. Alaska was projected to lose $643 million of funding under the previous version of the bill, according to data from the Urban Institute and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The influx of money may be able to reverse Alaska’s losses.

[Whip count: Where Senate Republicans stand on the new bill]

Just as interesting as who was targeted by these changes is who wasn’t targeted. The bill makes almost no effort to recruit moderates such as Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine), who has already stated her objection to the new bill.

Those senators have asked for more Medicaid funding, which the CBO projected would be cut by 26 percent over the next decade and 35 percent the decade after. Tax credits for people buying insurance on the exchanges, which would decrease by more than $400 billion under the bill, did not increase either. Planned Parenthood will still lose Medicaid funding for a year, which Collins and Murkowski have called a dealbreaker.

A vote could come as early as next week.

Share

Source: Staff reports. Legislator images via Government Printing Office. Originally published July 13, 2017.

Most Read

Follow Post Graphics