FISCAL 2018 FUNDING

IS A MOVING TARGET

Funded by temporary measure

Days before

deadline

Funding

deadline

Shutdown

OCT. 2017

Funding for

Oct. 1 to Dec. 8

(passed Sept. 8)

NOV. 2017

DEC. 2017

Funding was

extended twice

in December

JAN. 2018

Deadline

missed

Funding deal

until Feb. 8

FEB. 2018

Deadline

missed

Spending deal

on spending

levels

Need to work

out exact budget

by March 23

MARCH 2018

Plan for

funding through

Sept. 2019

FISCAL 2018 FUNDING IS A MOVING TARGET

Funded by temporary measure

Shutdown

Days before deadline

Funding deadline

OCT. 2017

NOV. 2017

Funding for

Oct. 1 to Dec. 8

(passed Sept. 8)

JAN. 2018

DEC. 2017

Deadline

missed

Funding

deal until

Feb. 8

Funding was

extended twice

in December

MARCH 2018

FEB. 2018

Deadline

missed

Funding deal

on spending

levels

Need to work

out exact budget

by March 23

Plan for

funding through

Sept. 2019

FISCAL 2018 FUNDING IS A MOVING TARGET

Funded by temporary measure

Days before deadline

Funding deadline

Shutdown

DEC. 2017

OCT. 2017

NOV. 2017

Funding for

Oct. 1 to Dec. 8

(passed Sept. 8)

Funding was

extended twice

in December

MARCH 2018

JAN. 2018

FEB. 2018

Deadline

missed

Deadline

missed

Funding deal

on spending

levels

Need to work

out exact budget

by March 23

Deadline to

determine where

funding will go

Funding

deal until

Feb. 8

Temporary spending bills and deadline brinkmanship might seem like a zany way to fund the federal government. It is, however, the norm. Since 1952, only five years have had budgets approved before the new fiscal year began, according to the Congressional Research Service. The last of those was 1997, under Democratic President Bill Clinton and with Republicans running Congress.

A bill passed Friday morning – after a brief temporary shutdown that began at midnight – will lift “sequester” limits imposed by a 2011 budget deal to allow higher spending for this year and next. But it will approve only specific temporary spending until March 23 to give Congress time to decide how the larger amounts will be spent.

Since the current system began in 1977, the government has averaged over four temporary spending bills per year. This figure is driven up by years such as 2001 that had 10 one-day funding bills in a row and ended up with 21 for the year.

Funded by temporary measure

Shutdown

Normal funding

New

extension

Total temporary

measures used

Fiscal

years

Jan. 1

Funded by temporary measure

Shutdown

Normal funding

New

extension

Total temporary

measures used

Fiscal

years

Jan. 1

Government shut down for 16 days in October 2013.

Members of Congress had to leave the campaign trail to pass one-day temporary measures in late 2000.

There were two shutdowns in fiscal 1996

In the 1980s, the government was always funded by temporary measures.

Normal funding

Funded by temporary measure

Shutdown

New

extension

Fiscal

years

Jan. 1

Government shut down for 16 days in October 2013.

Members of Congress had to leave the campaign trail to pass one-day temporary measures in late 2000.

There were two shutdowns in fiscal 1996

In the 1980s, the government was always funded by temporary measures.

About this story

Data from Congressional Research Service 2016 report “Continuing Resolutions: Overview of Components and Recent Practices” and Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget’s Appropriations Watch. Additional information on the bill from Senate Appropriations Committee.

Originally published Feb. 8, 2018.

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