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Before and after: Kilauea’s wrath on the Big Island

Kilauea has been erupting for decades, but the volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island has been particularly active in recent weeks. Numerous fissures opened up, spewing lava and noxious gases into residential areas. Leilani Estates, a subdivision on the southeastern edge of the island, was evacuated almost two weeks ago as lava flows destroyed dozens of homes and other structures.

On Tuesday, DigitalGlobe released a series of before and after satellite images showing Kilauea’s assault on the neighborhood.

2017

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Satellite Image ©2018 DigitalGlobe, a Maxar company/AP

2018

Satellite Image ©2018 DigitalGlobe, a Maxar company/AP

2017

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Satellite Image ©2018 DigitalGlobe, a Maxar company/AP

2018

Satellite Image ©2018 DigitalGlobe, a Maxar company/AP

2017

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Satellite Image ©2018 DigitalGlobe, a Maxar company/AP

2018

Satellite Image ©2018 DigitalGlobe, a Maxar company/AP

2017

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DigitalGlobe/GoogleEarth

2018

Bruce Omori/Paradise Helicopters/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK

2017

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Satellite Image ©2018 DigitalGlobe, a Maxar company/AP

2018

Satellite Image ©2018 DigitalGlobe, a Maxar company/AP

Early Thursday morning, Kilauea erupted explosively, spewing boulders and wet, dusty ash into the sky, an event scientists warned might happen as the volcano’s draining lava lake approached groundwater.

The explosion did not pose an immediate threat to people in the vicinity, scientists said Thursday, but Mike Poland, a geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey who was based at Kilauea from 2005 to 2015, warned of more activity.

“This is the sort of explosive activity that was anticipated,” Poland told The Post. “It's not going to be the only one. Very likely there will be additional events.”