National

Gunned down: 24 hours across America

Mass shootings grab the nation’s attention, but people get gunned down every day across America. Monday was particularly violent. Reports of shots fired brought police swarming in Philadelphia, Chicago, St. Louis and Denver and revealed a grim toll: 11 dead. There were shootings elsewhere, too; the Gun Violence Archive lists 63 so far for the date. Tap through to see scenes from a day of gun violence.

12 p.m. EST — Philadelphia Police find bodies of four shooting victims

COVER PHOTO: Matt Rourke/ AP; Matt Rourke/AP

The first grim news came from southwest Philadelphia. At noon, police officers went to a rowhouse and discovered the bodies of two men, who were cousins, and two women, each shot once in the head. All were found dead in the basement, according to ABC affiliate WPVI. As of Tuesday afternoon, police had not identified any suspects.

Matt Rourke/ AP

Matt Rourke/ AP

“All four of these individuals were executed; there are no ifs, ands or buts about it. I can’t get my mind around the fact that you have people walking around capable of such vicious acts.”

— Philadelphia Police Commissioner Richard Ross via ABC affiliate WPVI

3 p.m. CST — Chicago
Man opens fire in the parking lot of Mercy Hospital

Zbigniew Bzdak/Chicago Tribune via AP

Within the same hour, two shootings broke out in public in the Midwest. In Chicago, a man targeted his ex-fiancee, an emergency room physician, with a handgun in the parking lot, then ran into the hospital where patients and staff dived to the floors, The Washington Post reported. He shot and killed a Chicago police officer and a pharmacy resident who was engaged to be married next summer. The gunman also died at the scene.

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Reuters

Zbigniew Bzdak/Chicago Tribune via AP

Scott Olson/Getty Images

“The city of Chicago lost a doctor, pharmaceutical assistant and a police officer, all going about their day, all doing what they loved. This just tears at the soul of our city. It is the face and a consequence of evil.”

— Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel

Scott Olson/Getty Images

Armando L. Sanchez/Chicago Tribune via AP

3:19 p.m. CST — St. Louis
Shooting in a Catholic Supply store reported to police

Johanna Huckeba/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP

Then in St. Louis, along a busy strip shopping center, a man walked inside a Catholic Supply store, sexually assaulted at least one woman there and opened fire. A 53-year-old woman who sang in her church choir died a few hours later, according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. The suspect was still at large Tuesday afternoon.

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Reuters

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4 p.m. MST — Denver
At least one gunman opens fire on crowd of people

Reuters

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Next, a man opened fire a few blocks from Denver’s baseball stadium. An eyewitness who spoke to the Denver Post said the group of people fired upon may have been homeless. IOne died, and four were wounded, all hospitalized in stable condition, the Post reported.

6:20 p.m. EST — Baltimore
Child caught in the crossfire of a shooting

Kenneth K. Lam/The Baltimore Sun/AP

In early evening, a 5-year-old girl headed for the corner store near her West Baltimore house. She got caught in crossfire and was shot in the groin. She is expected to survive, according to the Baltimore Sun. The girl, Amy Hayes, is the sister of Taylor Hayes, a 7-year-old who died in July after being shot in the back seat of a car.

Kenneth K. Lam/The Baltimore Sun via AP

After Monday’s shooting at Mercy Hospital, doctors spoke out anew against the National Rifle Association, which had tweeted that physicians should “stay in their lane” amid their calls for more medical research into gun violence and its toll. Monday night, on “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon,” Toms founder Blake Mycoskie said his shoe company would donate $5 million to organizations across the country working to end gun violence. On Tuesday afternoon, Baltimore police organized a community walk for Amy Hayes.

“We’ve got to do more. Not just as a police department, but we have to do more as a community. We have become so desensitized to the level of violence in this city that it is just totally, totally unacceptable.”

— Acting Baltimore Police Commissioner Gary Tuggle