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What Hurricane Florence looks and sounds like as it makes landfall

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With a 400-mile wide zone of tropical-storm-force winds, Hurricane Florence began its treacherous assault on the Carolinas Thursday, lingered off the coast and finally made landfall near Wrightsville Beach, N.C., Friday morning.

Those who stayed braced for Florence’s arrival, watching and recording the storm’s outer bands and, hours later, its eye, move across the Carolinas. This is what they saw — and heard — from inside Hurricane Florence.

This story includes audio. Click on the volume button at the top for the full experience.

Cover video: Explore.org via Storyful

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New Bern, N.C.

WNCT/ AP

Sharp winds and heavy rain first whipped the Outer Banks throughout the day Thursday, thrusting the surging sea across the thin barrier islands, inside the garages of beach homes and down abandoned streets.

Atlantic Beach, N.C.

Travis Long/News & Observer/AP

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Hatteras Island, N.C.

Jenni Koontz of Epic Shutter Photography via Storyful

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Hatteras Island, N.C.

Jenni Koontz of Epic Shutter Photography via Storyful

Atlantic Beach, N.C.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

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New Bern, N.C.

Persimmons via Storyful

By nightfall, evacuated residents settled into shelters.Those who decided to ride out the storm faced a Category 1 hurricane that slowed to a crawl and unleashed epic rains. Hundreds of thousands of homes lost power, and the National Weather Service reported a 10-foot storm surge along the Neuse River in Morehead City, N.C.

Around 2 a.m., officials announced about 150 residents awaited rescue in badly flooded New Bern, N.C., a riverfront community and one of the state’s oldest cities.

Wilmington, N.C.

Chuck Liddy/ News & Observer/AP

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Topsail Beach, N.C.

Aaron Jayjack/The Washington Post

New Bern, N.C.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

By 6 a.m. Friday, Florence’s eyewall had come ashore near Wilmington, N.C., and daylight revealed the initial damage and flooding that the hurricane’s fierce winds and unrelenting rain had delivered in the dark.

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Wilmington, N.C.

Reuters

New Bern, N.C.

Chris Seward/AP

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Wilmington, N.C.

Rachel Kirschman /Instagram

Wilmington, N.C.

Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post

James City, N.C.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Florence remains a slow-moving hurricane and will continue tracking inland throughout Friday and into the weekend.

This story will be updated with additional footage as we receive it.