Joseph Crowley (D-N.Y.), left, and James E. Clyburn (D-S.C.), right, listen during the State of the Union speech. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) takes a selfie with President Trump. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

No one expected President Trump to win over his skeptics in one speech. And judging by some of the congressional reaction to his first State of the Union address on Tuesday, it’s possible he exacerbated the divisions. Democrats largely sat stone-faced as Trump called for unity, then pushed a sharply conservative wish list for 2018, which included curbing legal immigration and welfare programs.

See for yourself. We’ve annotated the body language from lawmakers during six key moments of Trump’s speech.

1. “Mr. Speaker, the president of the United States.”

Republicans

Congressional Black

Caucus members

Republicans

Rep. Virginia Foxx (R-N.C.)

TRUMP

Non-voting Rep. Aumua Amata Coleman Radewagen

(R-American Samoa)

Congressional

Black Caucus members

Republicans

TRUMP

Non-voting Rep. Aumua Amata Coleman Radewagen

(R-American Samoa)

Congressional

Black Caucus members

(Photo by Jonathan Newton/The Washington Post)

There’s no assigned seating for the State of the Union. Some lawmakers get there well in advance to reserve aisle seats and be seen greeting the president like their long-lost friend. Aumua Amata Coleman Radewagen, leaning into Trump, is the non-voting representative from American Samoa. Next to her is Republican Rep. Virginia Foxx of North Carolina.

But partisanship never dies, and it's especially fraught with a president this polarizing. See those lawmakers standing in the foreground of the photo, away from the aisle? Those are House Democrats who are no fans of the president. Many hope to reap political rewards back home by showing defiance. Most of these lawmakers didn't clap as the president made his way down the aisle, nor for most of his lengthy speech. They're also wearing black to signal support for the #MeToo movement and survivors of sexual harassment — an inherently political act, given the president has been accused of sexual misconduct with more than a dozen women.

2. “With us tonight is one of the toughest people ever to serve in this House — a guy who took a bullet, almost died and was back to work three and a half months later: the legend from Louisiana, Congressman Steve Scalise.”

Rep. Steve Scalise (R-La.) thanks the crowd. (Melina Mara/The Washington Post)

Trump started off his speech by acknowledging what a rough year America had with disasters: hurricanes, floods, wildfires, mudslides, mass shootings. It was supposed to be one of the least partisan moments of his speech, but this section ended up underscoring just how unwilling Democrats are to assume he means good intentions.

Trump zeroed in on a June shooting in Alexandria, Va., at a GOP congressional baseball practice that wounded five, including Rep. Steve Scalise (R-La.), who recently returned to Congress after months of treatment.

A shout out to Scalise’s survival and renewed health earned a standing ovation from his colleagues in Congress. But what Trump said next did not. He used the shooting — which, for a week or so eliminated party lines in Congress — to make a call for unity in a similar spirit: "Tonight, I call upon all of us to set aside our differences, to seek out common ground, and to summon the unity we need to deliver for the people we were elected to serve."

That line fell flat with Democrats, who saw it as ironic in the extreme. From their perspective, Trump and his penchant for controversy — and his rejection of bipartisan immigration deals — is the main driver for Washington's disunity. The body language of House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) during this moment couldn't have been clearer:

3. “We enacted the biggest tax cuts in American history.”

Trump's biggest accomplishment in 2017 came on strictly partisan lines. Republicans rewrote much of the tax code for the first time in nearly three decades without a single Democratic vote.

This moment in time may also portend fights to come.

Republicans

TRUMP

Democrats

TRUMP

Republicans

Democrats

TRUMP

Republicans

Huge applause

Democrats

Some on their phones

The tax bill was Trump's only major legislative victory in 2017, and it only happened because Republicans were able to use a Senate procedure allowing them to duck a Democratic filibuster. Trump won't be able to use that trick in 2018. He'll have to rely on Democratic votes, especially in the Senate, to get major legislation passed. What he couldn't do last year will only get more difficult this year as midterm elections draw nearer, and both sides retreat to their corners.

“And something I'm very proud of, African American unemployment stands at the lowest rate ever recorded,” Trump said.

The “very proud” bit was Trump’s impromptu add to the prepared script, and members of the Congressional Black Caucus weren’t buying any of it. They sat stone-faced as Republicans broke into applause and House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) led a standing ovation. (Only caucus member Rep. Al Lawson, a freshman Democrat from Florida, clapped.) Nor did they seem to appreciate how the president singled out Corey Adams, an African American employee at an Ohio business that would be handing out raises, Trump said, because of the tax code overhaul. “Corey, please stand,” directed Trump, who then added: “And he’s a great welder.” Caucus members have noted that unemployment for blacks already was falling under President Barack Obama. They pointedly wore kente cloth to the address, they said, to protest Trump’s comments about Haiti and African nations being “shithole” countries.

4. “It's time for Congress to give these wonderful, incredible Americans the right to try.”

The Democratic Party after Trump's first year in office is an ideologically wide one. On one spectrum, more than a dozen liberal House Democrats boycotted the State of the Union. On the other, a handful of Senate Democrats up for reelection in states Trump won last November leapt to their feet when they felt it was appropriate, like Sens. Joe Manchin III (D-W. Va.) and Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.) did when Trump endorsed an experimental drug bill that the Senate passed last year. Manchin also stood when Trump talked about infrastructure and reviving cities like Detroit.

Stabenow

(D-Mich.)

Manchin

(D-W. Va.)

TRUMP

Republicans

Democrats

Sen. Joe

Manchin

(D-W. Va.)

Sen. Debbie Stabenow

(D-Mich.)

Sen. Amy Klobuchar

(D-Minn.)

CABINET

SUPREME

COURT

GENERALS

TRUMP

Republicans

Democrats

Sen. Joe

Manchin

(D-W. Va.)

Sen. Debbie Stabenow

(D-Mich.)

CABINET

Sen. Amy Klobuchar

(D-Minn.)

TRUMP

What Manchin and a number of other vulnerable Senate Democrats think about Trump’s agenda matters. They are the most likely Democrats to cross over and vote for some GOP proposals. In fact, it may be in their political interest to look like they support Trump: At least five of these Democrats are running for reelection in states Trump won by double digits.

5. “One of my greatest priorities is to reduce the price of prescription drugs.”

“What? You can't even stand for that one?” Trump didn't say that, but his body language did. It was a rare break of the unspoken barrier between the president delivering an ostensibly nonpartisan State of the Union address and the unavoidable partisanship in the room. For a guy who loves applause and recognition, the president almost certainly noticed that Democrats had rarely given his words a hearty clap, much less a standing ovation, on a fairly bipartisan line.

About halfway through the speech, Trump offered them something he thought they should stand for — lowering prescription drug prices — and he couldn't help but express his frustration that didn't get Democrats to their feet for it.

Lowering prescription drug prices is not really a partisan issue. But such is the state of our union that applauding for Trump at the State of the Union is.

6. “Americans are dreamers, too.”

One way to gauge whether Trump’s immigration proposal is going to pass Congress is to get every member of Congress in a room and have him propose it. Answer: It doesn't look likely. In fact, talking about immigration is the only time Trump got audible boos from Democratic lawmakers.

In exchange for legalizing nearly 2 million “dreamers,” Trump wants to curb legal immigration in fairly drastic ways, like ending the ability of U.S. citizens to sponsor visas for their parents and siblings. His is a sharply conservative plan, one that even some establishment Republicans don’t support. Trump spent most of his time in this section of the speech selling the “great” border wall rather than bothering to convince Democrats they should support it.

It’s an open question whether Congress can come up with a deal to protect dreamers by a Trump-imposed March deadline. Congress’s muted reaction to Trump’s plan makes clear they likely won’t go with the one he proposed. Even some Republicans expressed displeasure. While Trump’s remarks drew standing applause from most of the president’s party, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) remained seated.

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Ann Gerhart and Chiqui Esteban contributed to this graphic.

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