President Trump has warned his supporters that if Democrats take back Congress this November and he gets impeached, it will be their fault. But Trump appears to be doing a lot himself to try to keep that from happening.

He played a remarkably activist role in Republican primaries, wielding his influential Twitter account to help knock out sitting Republican members of Congress who spoke ill of him and to save others at the last minute when it looked as though the Trump base was abandoning them.

But now the real test for Trump begins: Just how effective will his endorsements be in the November general election for Congress? The answer could determine Trump’s fate, as Democrats could take back control of the House of Representatives this November and maybe the Senate.

Here’s a look at all the congressional candidates he’s on the record as supporting. In the final stretch of the election season, Trump is expected to ramp up his endorsements.

Here are the Trump-endorsed candidates he’s held rallies for

Endorsement type:

Rally

Speech

Other (e.g., interview)

 Hover over an endorsement to learn more

Lou Barletta

Senate (Pa.)

Kevin Cramer

Senate (N.D.)

Matt Rosendale

Senate (Mont.)

Marsha Blackburn

Senate (Tenn.)

Dean Heller

Senate (Nev.)

Josh Hawley

Senate (Mo.)

Patrick Morrisey

Senate (W.Va.)

Jim Renacci

Senate (Ohio)

Danny Tarkanian

House (Nev.)

Katie Arrington

House (S.C.)

Rick Scott

Senate (Fla.)

Carol Miller

House (W.Va.)

Roger Wicker

Senate (Miss.)

Mike Braun

Senate (Ind.)

Cindy Hyde-Smith

Senate (Miss.)

Jim Hagedorn

House (Minn.)

Karin Housley

Senate (Minn.)

Jason Lewis

House (Minn.)

Greg Gianforte

House (Mont.)

Steve Watkins

House (Kan.)

Here are the candidates Trump has at least tweeted about

Dan Donovan

House (N.Y.)

John James

Senate (Mich.)

Ted Cruz

Senate (Tex.)

Martha McSally

Senate (Ariz.)

Pete Stauber

House (Minn.)

Troy Balderson

House (Ohio)

Deb Fischer

Senate (Neb.)

Diane Harkey

House (Calif.)

Devin Nunes

House (Calif.)

Martha Roby

House (Ala.)

Keith Rothfus

House (Pa.)

Lee Zeldin

House (N.Y.)

John Barrasso

Senate (Wyo.)

Mike Bishop

House (Mich.)

Mike Bost

House (Ill.)

Paul Cook

House (Calif.)

Tom Emmer

House (Minn.)

Lena Epstein

House (Mich.)

Matt Gaetz

House (Fla.)

Clay Higgins

House (La.)

Dave Hughes

House (Minn.)

David Kustoff

House (Tenn.)

Kevin McCarthy

House (Calif.)

Dana Rohrabacher

House (Calif.)

Mitt Romney

Senate (Utah)

Pete Sessions

House (Tex.)

Bryan Steil

House (Wis.)

Corey Stewart

Senate (Va.)

Leah Vukmir

Senate (Wis.)

Kevin Yoder

House (Kan.)

Ted Yoho

House (Fla.)

Trump is all-in on supporting Republicans for the Senate, where they are defending their 51-to-49 majority. Among his most favored Senate candidates is Pennsylvania’s Lou Barletta — one of his earliest supporters who served on the presidential transition team — who is seeking to unseat Democratic Sen. Robert P. Casey Jr. Barletta is not favored to win.

Trump embraces Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.) at a rally in Johnson City, Tenn., on Oct. 1. Blackburn is running in a competitive Senate race. (Mark Humphrey/AP)

At a rally in Rochester, Minn., on Oct. 4, Trump shakes hands with Jim Hagedorn, the Republican candidate for the 1st Congressional District. (Craig Lassig/EPA-EFE)

During the primary seasons, Trump jumped into pitched Republican battles, and he almost always sided with the winning candidate. He liked to take credit for it, too.

“After my speech on Saturday night, there was a big turn for the better,” he tweeted about Troy Balderson (R-Ohio) after his victory in a special election for a House seat. “He will win BIG in Nov.,” Trump added.

But because those primaries were mostly deep in Republican territory, Trump has played it safe in House races. He rarely has endorsed candidates in toss-up races that could decide control of the House, which is the chamber in Congress most likely to flip to Democrats this November.

By contrast, he has supported Republican candidates in tough Senate races. He's traveled to Las Vegas to hold a rally for Sen. Dean Heller (R-Nev.), who is the most vulnerable Republican Senate candidate in 2018, for example.

Trump has backed Republicans in competitive Senate races ...

Seat that Trump has targeted/endorsed

DEMOCRATIC-HELD

SEATS (26)

REPUBLICAN-HELD

SEATS (9)

Safe/likely

Safe/likely

18

5

Lean (D)

Lean (R)

3

0

Competitive

Competitive

5

4

… but has been largely silent in toss-up House races.

DEMOCRATIC-HELD

SEATS (195)

REPUBLICAN-HELD

SEATS (240)

Trump tends to endorse safe Republicans.

Safe/likely

Safe/likely

171

191

Lean (D)

Lean (R)

1

25

Competitive

Competitive

3

44

Note: Data based on the Cook Political Report’s race ratings, which frequently change.

Ratings shown are as of Oct. 8.

Trump has backed Republicans in competitive Senate races ...

Seat that Trump has targeted/endorsed

DEMOCRATIC-HELD SEATS (26)

REPUBLICAN-HELD SEATS (9)

More solidly Democratic

More solidly Republican

Safe/likely

Lean (D)

Competitive

Competitive

Lean (R)

Safe/likely

18

3

5

4

0

5

… but has been largely silent in toss-up House races.

DEMOCRATIC-HELD SEATS (195)

REPUBLICAN-HELD SEATS (240)

More solidly Democratic

More solidly Republican

Trump tends to endorse safe Republicans.

Safe/likely

Lean (D)

Competitive

Competitive

Lean (R)

Safe/likely

191

1

3

44

25

171

Note: Data based on the Cook Political Report’s race ratings, which frequently change.

Ratings shown are as of Oct. 8.

Trump has backed Republicans in competitive Senate races ...

Seat that Trump has targeted or endorsed

DEMOCRATIC-HELD SEATS (26)

REPUBLICAN-HELD SEATS (9)

More solidly Democratic

More solidly Republican

Safe/likely

Lean (D)

Competitive

Competitive

Lean (R)

Safe/likely

18

3

5

4

0

5

… but has been largely silent in toss-up House races.

DEMOCRATIC-HELD SEATS (195)

REPUBLICAN-HELD SEATS (240)

More solidly Democratic

More solidly Republican

Trump tends to endorse safe Republicans.

Safe/likely

Lean (D)

Competitive

Competitive

Lean (R)

Safe/likely

191

1

3

44

25

171

Note: Data based on the Cook Political Report’s race ratings, which frequently change. Ratings shown are as of Oct. 8.

Trump has crisscrossed the country to try to energize his base, spending the most time in states he won in 2016. And despite polls regularly showing that half the country disapproves of the job he's doing, he hasn't shied away from making the midterm elections a referendum on him. As he often reminds supporters attending rallies, “A vote for [candidate] is a vote for me, and for our agenda to make America great again.”

Where Trump has held

campaign rallies

MT

ND

MN

OH

PA

NV

IN

WV

MO

KS

TN

SC

MS

FL

Where Trump has held campaign rallies

MT

ND

Billings

MN

Rochester

PA

OH

NV

WV

IN

Topeka

Charleston

MO

Las Vegas

KS

TN

SC

MS

Tampa

FL

We'll find out in November whether Trump’s activist-endorsement strategy works.

Kevin Uhrmacher contributed to this report.

About this story

The Washington Post collected data from Twitter, White House pool reports, statements from Trump’s campaign, speech transcripts and videos collected by Factba.se and news media clips in which President Trump refers to candidates running for House or Senate seats in the midterms. Other endorsements include events, interviews and statements released by the Trump campaign.

To determine the vulnerability of a Senate or House seat, we used the Cook Political Report's race ratings. Seats that are “likely” or “solid” are labeled together as “safe/likely.” Seats from Cook’s “toss-up” category are labeled “competitive,” while “lean” remains the same. Ratings shown are as of Oct. 4.

Originally published Oct. 5, 2018.

Blackburn, Heller, Housley, Morrisey and Tarkanian photos from AFP/Getty Images. Arrington, Barletta, Braun, Cramer, Jenkins, Miller, Renacci, Rosendale, Scott and Trump photos from AP. Hagedorn, Hawley and Lewis photos from Reuters. Wicker photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.

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