Because nearly 13 percent of Americans are foreign-born, U.S. soccer fans need only look toward their neighbors to find a backup team to cheer for.

Based on census data, The Washington Post set out to find pockets of World Cup fandom based on foreign-born populations living within the United States. We limited our analysis to the 29 teams that actually qualified for the World Cup (sorry Italy and Netherlands, we feel your pain) and that have country-of-origin data available in the census (Tunisia, Senegal and Iceland are omitted). We took that data and mapped it, showing the largest foreign-born population in each county.

Country of birth of largest

immigrant group

Mexico

Germany

Korea

Japan

Poland

England

Russia

Other

Population

10k to 100k

More than 100k

10 to 10k

Seattle

Chicago

New

York

 

San Francisco

Denver

Los

Angeles

Atlanta

500 MILES

Houston

Miami

500 MILES

800 MILES

Country of birth of largest immigrant group

Mexico

Germany

Korea

England

Japan

Poland

Russia

Other

Population

10k to 100k

More than 100k

10 to 10k

Seattle

New York

 

Chicago

San Francisco

Denver

Washington, D.C.

Los

Angeles

Atlanta

200 MILES

Houston

Miami

Honolulu

Anchorage

Mexican immigrants are the largest group in more than 2,300 counties

200 MILES

400 MILES

Country of birth of largest immigrant group

Poland

Russia

Other

Mexico

Germany

Korea

England

Japan

Population

10k to 100k

More than 100k

10 to 10k

Seattle

New York

 

Chicago

San Francisco

Denver

Washington, D.C.

Los

Angeles

Atlanta

200 MILES

Houston

Miami

Mexican immigrants are the largest group in more than 2,300 counties

Honolulu

Anchorage

200 MILES

400 MILES

The large number of Mexican immigrants throughout the United States obscures other interesting patterns. The map below shows the same data, except it excludes Mexican immigrants. Here we can see large swaths of German and Korean immigrants.

Country of birth of largest immigrant

group, excluding Mexico

Germany

Korea

England

Japan

Poland

Russia

Other

Population

10k to 100k

More than 100k

10 to 10k

Seattle

New

York

 

Chicago

San Francisco

Denver

Los

Angeles

Atlanta

500 MILES

Houston

Miami

500 MILES

800 MILES

Country of birth of largest immigrant group, excluding Mexico

Germany

Korea

England

Japan

Poland

Russia

Other

Population

10k to 100k

More than 100k

10 to 10k

Seattle

Polish immigrants near Chicago

New York

 

Chicago

San Francisco

Denver

Washington, D.C.

Los

Angeles

Atlanta

200 MILES

Korean immigrants near Los Angeles

Houston

Miami

Honolulu

Anchorage

Japanese immigrants in Hawaii

200 MILES

400 MILES

Country of birth of largest immigrant group, excluding Mexico

Poland

Russia

Other

Germany

Korea

England

Japan

Population

10k to 100k

More than 100k

10 to 10k

Seattle

Polish immigrants near Chicago

New York

 

Chicago

San Francisco

Denver

Washington, D.C.

Los

Angeles

Atlanta

Korean immigrants near Los Angeles

200 MILES

Houston

Miami

Honolulu

Anchorage

Japanese immigrants in Hawaii

200 MILES

400 MILES

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The places that have the most fans born elsewhere, by percentage of the population

Every country’s population is distributed in different ways. Polish immigrants are clustered near Chicago, Koreans in Los Angeles, and there are small pockets of Basque Spaniards in eastern Oregon and Idaho. These maps show where people born in each World Cup country make up the largest share of the total county population. We’ve excluded counties where fewer than 25 residents were born in the World Cup nation.

Group A
Uruguay
Egypt
Russia
Saudi Arabia
Group B
Spain
Portugal
Morocco
Iran
Group C
France
Denmark
Australia
Peru
Group D
Argentina
Croatia
Iceland
Nigeria
Group E
Brazil
Switzerland
Costa Rica
Serbia
Group F
Germany
Mexico
Sweden
Korea
Group G
Belgium
England
Tunisia
Panama
Group H
Colombia
Poland
Senegal
Japan

About this story

Foreign-born population data from the 2016 5-year American Community Survey. “Korea” refers to those that report their country of birth as South Korea, North Korea or just Korea.

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