Meet the changing face of Congress

The 2018 midterm elections brought historic gains for women and people of color on Capitol Hill. On Thursday, over 100 women were sworn in on the floor of the House and 25 in the Senate, combined to make up nearly a quarter of the voting membership of Congress.

Cover photo by Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Reps. Lauren A. Underwood (D-Ill.), left, and Elissa Slotkin (D-Mich.)

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Reps. Mikie Sherill (D-N.J.), center, and Lois Frankel (D-Fla.), right,

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Reps. Haley Stevens (D-Mich.), right, and Rosa L. DeLauro (D-Conn.), left

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.)

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Omar became one of the first two Muslim women sworn into Congress. On Thursday, she broke another boundary when she wore a hijab on the floor of the House, after a rule banning all headwear was changed to allow for religious coverings.

Rep. Sharice Davids (D-Kan.)

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.)

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

As Pelosi became speaker of the house for a second time, she recognized the symbolism of the moment. “I’m particularly proud to be the woman speaker of the House of this Congress, which marks the 100th year of women having the right to vote,” she said, drawing a standing ovation.

Rep. Lucy McBath (D-Ga.)

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From left, Reps. Lizzie Fletcher (D-Tex.), Angie Craig (D-Minn.), Sylvia Garcia (D-Tex.), Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) and Debbie Mucarsel-Powell (D-Fla.)

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Salwan Georges/The Washington Post

The Democrats took control of the House on the 13th day of a partial government shutdown, the result of an impasse over President Trump’s demand for billions of dollars of funding for a U.S.-Mexico border wall.