What’s coming up in impeachment proceedings

The House held depositions, hearings and debate from late September through mid-December before voting Dec. 18 to approve two articles of impeachment against President Trump for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. The articles were sent to the Senate on Jan. 15 for the impeachment trial that formally began the next day. He is the third U.S. president in history to be impeached.

The full inquiry calendar
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The House passed a resolution naming impeachment managers on Wednesday.

House Democrats crafted the articles of impeachment after weeks of closed-door depositions with 17 government witnesses, and televised public hearings with many of those officials, relating to the president’s July 25 phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

[Who’s involved in the Trump impeachment inquiry]

Here is a list of scheduled events, followed by what has happened since the inquiry began. See something we missed? Let us know.

Jan. 16
Trial
Formalities to start the Senate trial
The swearing in of Chief Justice John Roberts, who will preside over the trial. Roberts swears in the senators as jurors.
Jan. 21, at 1 p.m.
Trial
Impeachment trial begins in earnest
Senate votes finalizing trial procedures and rules are expected.
Feb. 3
Other
Feb. 3, 2020: The Iowa caucuses kick off the presidential primary season.
NO NEED FOR DESCRIPTION HERE
Feb. 4
Other
Feb. 4, 2020: Trump scheduled to deliver the State of the Union address to Congress.
NO NEED FOR DESCRIPTION HERE
Feb. 11
Other
Feb. 11, 2020: The New Hampshire presidential primary.
NO NEED FOR DESCRIPTION HERE

What happened so far

Harry Stevens

Harry Stevens joined The Washington Post as a graphics reporter in 2019.

Dan Keating

Dan Keating analyzes data for projects, stories, graphics and interactive online presentations.

Kevin Uhrmacher

Kevin Uhrmacher is a graphics editor for politics covering elections and public policy at The Washington Post.

Chris Alcantara

Chris Alcantara is a graphics reporter at The Washington Post, where he uses code and data to tell visual stories on a variety of subjects, including politics and technology. He joined The Post in 2016.

About this story

Event and administration reaction information comes from House committee and White House documents and news reports. See something we missed? Let us know.

Originally published Oct. 2, 2019.

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