The Fix

The complete list of GOP lawmakers reacting to Trump’s ‘go back’ tweet

The vast majority of Republican members of Congress have not said anything publicly about President Trump’s Sunday morning tweet that four Democratic House members should “go back” to the “places from which they came.”

Days after he issued the tweet, 141 members of his party have offered a range of responses: Some flat-out rebuked Trump’s remarks, while others took the opportunity to criticize Democrats at the same time they condemned the president’s words. Others responded by embracing Trump and the sentiments in the tweet.

[Tell us when someone made you feel like an outsider in the United States]

Read each lawmaker’s initial statements about Trump’s comments below. Four Republicans joined Democrats in approving a resolution condemning Trump’s comments.

Rep. Justin Amash (I-Mich.) recently left the Republican Party, so his condemnation does not appear. Did we miss something? Let us know.

What Republican lawmakers said

YVoted ‘yes’ on a resolution condemning Trump’s comments

Condemned Trump’s remarks 19

Criticized Democrats and Trump 60

Have not commented/ Unclear/Dodged 109

Supported Trump’s remarks 62

These lawmakers specifically condemned Trump’s remarks.

These lawmakers criticized Democrats and Trump in the same statement.

These lawmakers haven't commented or have given vague statements.

These lawmakers defended Trump’s remarks or focused criticism on Democratic lawmakers

2 updates
Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick (R-PA)Y

Fitzpatrick broke with Republicans and supported a House resolution condemning Trump's comments. “As the Vice-Chair of the Bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus, Congressman Fitzpatrick has repeatedly stressed the critical need for civility in our discourse, from the kitchen table to the White House and everywhere in between. Pointing out differences in policy proposals is ok. Personal attacks on others are not ok,” Fitzpatrick said in a statement. Read more »

Rep. Will Hurd (R-TX)Y28 hours after Trump’s tweet

Hurd broke with Republicans and supported a House resolution condemning Trump's comments. “I think those tweets are racist and xenophobic,” Hurd told CNN. “They are also inaccurate, right. The four women he is referring to are actually citizens of the United States, three of the four were born here. It's also a behavior that's unbecoming of the leader of the free world. He should be talking about things that unite us, not divides us. And also, I think, politically, it doesn't help.” Read more »

Rep. Kelly Armstrong (R-ND)

“Engage them on policy all day long, but it just wrong to tell any U.S. citizen to ‘go back to where they came from,’ ” Armstrong said in a statement to the Forum. “Attacking any citizen based on where they are from is never OK.” Read more »

Rep. Troy Balderson (R-OH)30 hours after Trump’s tweet

To me, part of being patriotic means embracing the values laid out by our founding fathers. This includes being accepting of all races and cultures. Leaders of our great nation — including the President and all Members of Congress — should be held to high standards of decorum. Therefore I do not condone yesterday's tweets. Read more »

Rep. Tom Cole (R-OK)30 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I am deeply disappointed in the president’s comments directed toward fellow Americans and members of Congress. Use of such language is inappropriate and demeans the office of the presidency,” Cole tweeted. Read more »

Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX)

"I think what the President said was a mistake and an unforced error and that's about the total of my thoughts," Cornyn told CNN. "I don't think you are going to change somebody at this point in his life but hopefully he will, like all of us when we make a mistake, he'll learn from it." Read more »

Sen. Joni Ernst (R-IA)32 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Yeah I do [find Trump’s comments racist]. They’re American citizens,” Ernst said. “I personally think the GOP has a stronger platform to talk about. That’s what we should be focusing on.”

Rep. Mike Gallagher (R-WI)

"This week we will be voting on an intelligence authorization bill and a minimum wage bill on the House floor, but the only questions we will get asked, the only questions that will be debated on TV and social media, will be about tweets we can all agree were wrong. Instead of mean tweeting, let’s do our job and work to fix the looming budget crisis, a broken healthcare system, and a broken immigration system,” according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Read more »

Sen. Cory Gardner (R-CO)

“I disagree with the president. I wouldn’t have sent those tweets,” Gardner told KOA Newsradio. “I think he shouldn’t have done it. I think we ought to be focused on things and bringing this country together and moving this country forward.” Read more »

Rep. Bill Huizenga (R-MI)28 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I strongly disagree with what the President said in a series of tweets over the weekend. Every duly elected official needs to lead by example, end the personal character assassination attacks, and focus on finding ways to work together to make America the very best it can be.” Read more »

Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-GA)

Sen. Johnny Isakson said Trump’s comments were “totally inappropriate,” according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “I wasn't elected to make excuses or explain the statements of somebody else, and so I'm just not going to do that.” Read more »

Rep. David Joyce (R-OH)33 hours after Trump’s tweet

“What the President tweeted this weekend was wrong. It’s past time we all stop tearing each other down and focus our efforts on working together civilly to solve the challenges facing our country and build upon the success the American people have seen over the past few years,” Joyce tweeted. Read more »

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK)29 hours after Trump’s tweet

“There is no excuse for the president’s spiteful comments –they were absolutely unacceptable and this needs to stop,” Murkowski tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Pete Olson (R-TX)27 hours after Trump’s tweet

“The Tweet President Trump posted over the weekend about fellow Members of Congress are not reflective of the values of the 1,000,000+ people in Texas 22. We are proud to be the most diverse Congressional district in America. I urge our President immediately disavow his comments,” Olson tweeted. Read more »

Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH)28 hours after Trump’s tweet

“That’s not something I would say, and I think it’s divisive, unnecessary and wrong.” Read more »

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL)33 hours after Trump’s tweet

“The president shouldn’t have written that. I think it damages him. It damages the country, and none of us should be participants in identity politics,” Rubio told reporters. “I think the implication by anyone that you’re not as American as someone else because your parents were born somewhere else is ... directly counter to what makes America unique.” Read more »

Rep. Adrian Smith (R-NE)

"I do not agree with the President's tweets over the weekend. Our focus should be on constructive and thoughtful debate. We must work together to move forward as a nation," said Smith, according to Nebraska TV. Read more »

Rep. Michael R. Turner (R-OH)29 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I am confident that every Member of Congress is a committed American. @realDonaldTrump’s tweets from this weekend were racist and he should apologize. We must work as a country to rise above hate, not enable it,” Turner tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Rob Woodall (R-GA)

“[T]here is not a debate about whether or not it’s acceptable,” Woodall said of Trump's comments at a Rules Committee hearing. Read more »

2 updates
Rep. Susan Brooks (R-IN)Y39 hours after Trump’s tweet

Brooks broke with Republicans and supported a House resolution condemning Trump's comments. “As Americans, there is more that unites us than divides us. The President's remarks to my colleagues across the aisle are inappropriate and do not reflect American values. ALL of our elected officials need to raise their level of civility in order to address the serious issues facing our country,” Brooks said. Read more »

Rep. Fred Upton (R-MI)Y27 hours after Trump’s tweet

Upton broke with Republicans and supported a House resolution condemning Trump's comments. “Frankly I’m appalled by the President's tweets. There’s no excuse. Inflammatory rhetoric from both sides of the aisle that is used to divide us just isn’t right. It’s not helpful. We have too many challenges facing us ... that we ought to be working on together – immigration, the debt ceiling, the border crisis. The President’s tweets were flat out wrong and uncalled for, and I would encourage my colleagues from both parties to stop talking so much and start governing more,” Upton tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Don Bacon (R-NE)30 hours after Trump’s tweet

I believe the President’s tweets toward the four Congresswomen were unacceptable. When it comes to their far-left policies and extreme ideologies, I strongly disagree with them. However, they are entitled to the views they campaigned and won on. Any hatred toward any nationality is repugnant, whether it comes from the left or the right. Having more civility and mutual respect and removing the contempt in our political debate are a must if we want to make progress in Washington. Read more »

Rep. Rob Bishop (R-UT)

“Freedom of speech is a pillar of our democracy,” said a joint statement from Utah's three Republican congressmen. “We are not trying to censor President Trump or House Democrats. But, for the sake of not dividing our nation further, the inflammatory rhetoric needs to stop. From claims that ‘Nancy Pelosi is a racist’ to ‘Border agents are Nazis running concentration camps,’ it has gotten out of control. This resolution and these social media wars do nothing to unify our country and only take time and resources away from our true responsibility to get real legislative work done for the people of Utah.” Read more »

Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO)28 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Just because the so-called squad constantly insults and attacks the president isn’t a reason to adopt their unacceptable tactics,” Blunt said in a statement. ”There is plenty to say about how destructive House Democrats’ policies would be for our economy, our health care system, and our security. I think that’s where the focus should be.” Read more »

Rep. Vern Buchanan (R-FL)

“If Speaker Nancy Pelosi put as much energy into addressing the country’s problems as she does in denouncing the president, we wouldn’t be facing a crisis at the southern border,” Buchanan said, according to the Sarasota Herald-Tribune. “While I don’t agree with everything the President tweets, Pelosi’s resolution on the House floor today is another example of why Washington is so dysfunctional.” Read more »

Rep. Ken Buck (R-CO)

“I think he is frustrated there are members of the House that are continually criticizing this country and affecting his ability to conduct foreign policy,” Buck told Fox News. “Do I think the president ... used the most diplomatic way of trying to address that? ... I don’t think he did.” Read more »

Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME)28 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I disagree strongly with many of the views and comments of some of the far-left members of the House Democratic Caucus – especially when it comes to their views on socialism, their anti-Semitic rhetoric, and their negative comments about law enforcement – but the President’s tweet that some Members of Congress should go back to the ‘places from which they came’ was way over the line, and he should take that down,” Collins said in a statement. Read more »

Rep. Douglas A. Collins (R-GA)33 hours after Trump’s tweet

“This Congress is off to a rough start,” Collins said. “Politicians throw verbal bombs that hurt people and fail to legislate to help people. ICE facilities are being attacked with weapons, and, a few days ago, we saw a foreign fllag raised over an American facility. The president is frustrated that Congress has not acted to solve the crisis at our border, and he expressed his frustrations in a way that didn't promote reconciliation across the aisle and across our country. This country is wide open to everyone who respects our laws and wants to share in our freedoms. It is my hope we can have productive dialogue to replace frustration with understanding and actually do what the people sent us here to do: solve problems like the border crisis.” Read more »

Rep. Dan Crenshaw (R-TX)33 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I don't like the rhetoric. I don't like the heated rhetoric. It's as simple as that.,“ Crenshaw told The Post. “I think everything that's come out of those women's mouths is generally very wrong and deeply offensive, but that doesn't mean we should stoop to that level.” He tweeted “I check if there’s a crazy comment I have to weigh in on daily. Rhetoric in politics is out of control ... POTUS shouldn’t suggest Congresswomen should leave because of their rhetoric. Exhausting.” Read more »

Rep. John Curtis (R-UT)

“Freedom of speech is a pillar of our democracy,” said a joint statement from Utah's three Republican congressmen. “We are not trying to censor President Trump or House Democrats. But, for the sake of not dividing our nation further, the inflammatory rhetoric needs to stop. From claims that ‘Nancy Pelosi is a racist’ to ‘Border agents are Nazis running concentration camps,’ it has gotten out of control. This resolution and these social media wars do nothing to unify our country and only take time and resources away from our true responsibility to get real legislative work done for the people of Utah.” Read more »

Rep. Rodney Davis (R-IL)

“We saw the outcome of over-the-top political rhetoric in 2017 when Republican members of Congress, including myself, were shot at on a baseball field, and over the weekend, when we saw another armed extremist attack at an ICE facility in Washington State,” Davis said, according to the Journal Star. “While I strongly oppose many of the positions advocated for by my colleagues and their statements about law enforcement, I disagree with the rhetoric used by President Trump. Personal attacks do more harm than good and allow the negative consequences of policies being pushed by far-left members of the Democratic caucus to be ignored.” Read more »

Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart (R-FL)33 hours after Trump’s tweet

"There's a lot of issues out there that I think are important to highlight and you know, I think the more we can focus on issues and less on the personalities, the better,” Diaz-Balart told The Post. “I understand what the president was getting at, which is I think he was expressing his frustration of folks not understanding the greatness of this country. However I think the use of words was unfortunate."

Rep. Bill Flores (R-TX)

“Let me be clear, though: I do disapprove of the president’s tweets from this weekend. But I don’t think it’s my job to go issuing statements or to issue further condemnation of any kind. I don’t think that furthers the process of working together as a Congress and as an executive branch moving forward. I’d like to see both sides dial down the rhetoric,” Flores said in a town hall, according to the Eagle newspaper in Bryan, Tex. Read more »

Rep. Anthony Gonzalez (R-OH)29 hours after Trump’s tweet

“While I disagree passionately with many of my colleagues on substantive policy issues, the comments from @POTUS yesterday were wildly inappropriate. That type of rhetoric only divides us when we need to be coming together to solve the real problems we face as a nation,” Gonzalez tweeted. Read more »

Sen. Charles E. Grassley (R-IA)

"Democratically-elected officials should avoid name-calling and be treated respectfully,” Grassley said, according to the Des Moines Register. “That’s true of these members of Congress and that’s true of the president.” Read more »

Rep. H. Morgan Griffith (R-VA)

“I have previously said that the President should tone down his Twitter rhetoric, and I would say that again,” Griffith tweeted. “I think he is correct to be unhappy when Members of Congress constantly talk of our country with disrespect. I grew up with Merle Haggard, who sang, "When they’re runnin’ down our country, man, they’re walkin’ on the fightin’ side of me." Read more »

Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler (R-WA)34 hours after Trump’s tweet

“While I disagree on most policy matters w/ the Dem. congresswomen who were the subject of the president’s tweets this wkd, we are all Americans – as is the president. We can & must defend our ideas on how to improve our country w/o descending into divisive & demeaning language,” Herrera Beutler said. Read more »

Rep. Jody Hice (R-GA)35 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I firmly believe that all people are made in the image of God and are equal in his eyes. I don't believe the president is a racist, and although I wish he had been more diplomatic, I share his frustrations in regard to Members of Congress making repeated derogatory statements about the Nation we love, serve, and defend,” Hice said. Read more »

Rep. French Hill (R-AR)32 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Like many Americans, I'm tired of the war of outrageous and ill-informed comments—from our president and other elected officials. This country needs less social media back-and-forth and more civil debate on policies that contribute to a stronger, more united nation,” Hill tweeted. Read more »

Sen. John Hoeven (R-ND)

Hoeven said he "wouldn't have said what the president tweeted" but called for a focus on "policy and issues. In that regard, I oppose policies like socialism and open borders, and believe we need to strongly support law enforcement," he said, according to the Forum. Read more »

Rep. Dusty Johnson (R-SD)31 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Like the President, I’ve vehemently disagreed with the far left members of the House on policy, but his inappropriate comments were the wrong way to communicate that disagreement. We need to focus on governing this country, and his tweets weren’t helpful,” Johnson tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Mike Johnson (R-LA)

“There's a lot of really kind of dangerous rhetoric flying around the Capitol right now. It's devolved into a bit of a circus ... We have forgotten just how to show basic respect and dignity to one another as fellow Americans,” Johnson told KEEL radio. “The biggest purveyors of that, to be very frank, and look at the record and you can see this, particularly in this incoming class, is the 'Squad' ... They go out and they launch verbal grenades every single day.” He referred to Trump's tweets as “unfortunate” adding “I just think that everyone just needs to tone it down.” Read more »

Rep. John Katko (R-NY)28 hours after Trump’s tweet

“The President’s tweets were wrong. I have vehemently criticized lawmakers on the far-left when I disagree with the direction in which they want to take the country – but criticism should focus on policy,” Katko said. Read more »

Sen. John Neely Kennedy (R-LA)33 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Rule No. 1 in politics is, when your opponent is screwing up you never interrupt them,” Kennedy told The Post. “I think Congresswoman Omar and her colleagues are destroying the Democratic Party. I’d just let them go do it. If I didn’t know better, I’d think they were all Republican plants.” He later told Fox News, “I don't think President Trump is a racist. I don't think his original tweet was racist. I think it was a poor choice of words, which is why he clarified.” Read more »

Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL)32 hours after Trump’s tweet

”We as a nation have to demand better from our elected officials, on both sides of the aisle,” Kinzinger said. “What the President tweeted this weekend was wrong, and does nothing but further divide us. We can and should debate the ideas and argue over different policies. But to denigrate those you disagree with, especially like this, is not reflective of the high honor and responsibility that the office of the Presidency carries. Seeing countless media folks threaten over the supposed “silence” yesterday also contributes to division in our country, with the near constant outcry that puts way too much value and unrealistic expectations on who says what on Twitter. To respond to every thing the President says, just to appease the masses, would be a full time job and not particularly beneficial to the people I represent in IL-16. They know where I stand, they know I have said time and again that I strongly disagree with the President on tone and his use of Twitter, and they know where my moral compass points. This is an ugly time for political discourse, and we must ALL work harder to improve it.” Read more »

Rep. Darin LaHood (R-IL)

“It is not the language that I would have used, but I believe the president and many constituents in my district are deeply disturbed by the new radical agenda that these socialist members in the House are pushing of open borders, elimination of ICE, government-run health care, and continued anti-Israel, anti-America rhetoric,” said LaHood, according to the Journal Star. Read more »

Sen. James Lankford (R-OK)

“As a nation, we can and should debate ideas and policies, but we should also acknowledge that we are all Americans. Both sides of this situation should choose to work on building trust instead of seeking to ‘one-up’ each other with increasingly caustic and racially charged comments,” Lankford said in a statement. “The American people sent us to Washington to stand up for their values and actually solve the problems we face. Escalating personal attacks do not help that already difficult process.” Read more »

Rep. Tom McClintock (R-CA)

“I wish the president were more temperate in the words he sometimes uses and I agree that the tone of his recent remarks was unnecessarily provocative. But his central point is irrefutable: There is no requirement for those who hate our country to remain here when there are so many countries with different principles and values to choose from that have in turn produced very different results,” McClintock said on the House floor. “This president spoke not of race, but of patriotism.” Read more »

Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY)

“The president is not a racist,” McConnell said at a press conference, but declined to directly answer repeated questions about whether his tweets were racist. He said everyone involved should “lower this incideniary rhetoric” and that it would be a mistake “to single out any segment of this.” Read more »

Rep. David B. McKinley (R-WV)

“Since the day he was sworn in, President Trump has been under relentless pressure from Democrats and the media,” McKinley told MetroNews. “It appears this pressure must have gotten the best of him with his inarticulate and counterproductive response over the weekend. We can highlight the extreme positions of the Democrats without resorting to comments like these. Both sides should tone down the rhetoric.” Read more »

Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA)

“The president’s tweets yesterday were wrong and distract from the discourse we’re having in this country about socialism,” McMorris Rodgers said, according to the Spokesman-Review. “Freedom-loving Americans will win this debate with the facts, not personal attacks: Capitalism has done more to lift people out of poverty and raise the standard of living than any other economic system in the world.” Read more »

Rep. Paul Mitchell (R-MI)26 hours after Trump’s tweet

“.@RealDonaldTrump, we must be better than comments like these. I share the political frustrations with some members of the other party, but these comments are beneath leaders,” Mitchell tweeted. Read more »

Sen. Jerry Moran (R-KS)

“My view is that the congresswomen who the president referred to are American citizens, they are elected officials. It is inappropriate to suggest they go home to any place – they are home,” Moran said, according to the Kansas City Star. He added that he disagrees with the Democrats on policy, but “there’s nothing to be gained by personal attack.” Read more »

Rep. Dan Newhouse (R-WA)

"I strongly disagree with the far-left ideals of my colleagues on the other side of the aisle, and I oppose most of their policy proposals - not because of their race, gender, or religion, but because I believe the socialist, anti-Semitic, and anti-American ideas expressed, accepted, and promoted by members of the Democrat majority are not right for the American people,” Newhouse told the Grant County Journal. “I do not believe President Trump nor Speaker Pelosi are racist, but as a member of the House Civility & Respect Caucus, I believe Members of Congress and the Executive Branch should maintain mutual level of respect for one another – regardless of disagreements. I empathize with my colleague, Representative Cleaver, in his frustration with both parties in Congress, who seemingly just want to fight. I look forward to working on real policy issues and legislative solutions that are priorities for my constituents in Central Washington."

Rep. Tom Reed (R-NY)

“Obviously the rhetoric is not good on both sides. The problem that I see is extremism. This extremist movement on the Left that is taking over the Democratic Party,” Reed told Fox Business. Read more »

Rep. Martha Roby (R-AL)57 hours after Trump’s tweet

“As elected officials, we owe it to this country and our political discourse to combat unseemly speech consistently and fairly, but Democratic leadership in the House has demonstrated they are only willing to call out members of the opposing party by name while sparing their own from the finger-pointing,” Roby said in a statement. “While I do not condone the President’s recent comments, I will vote against H. Res. 489 because I refuse to participate in this blatant political gamesmanship. Regardless of party affiliation, we must all treat one another with respect and civility in order to effectively do the important work of the American people.”

Rep. Harold Rogers (R-KY)

“I strongly disagree with the radical socialist policies presented by my colleagues across the aisle, and I share the President’s frustration that their rhetoric does not move the conversation forward," Rogers said, according to the Commonwealth Journal. "But we can disagree without being disagreeable, and this entire conversation is a distraction from the real and imminent problems confronting the United States." Read more »

Sen. Mitt Romney (R-UT)29 hours after Trump’s tweet

”I certainly feel a number of these new members of Congress have views that are not consistent with my experience and not consistent with building a strong America,” Romney told NBC10 Boston. “At the same time, I recognize that the president has a unique and noble calling to unite all Americans regardless of our creeds or race or place of our national origin and I think in that case, the president fell far short.” He later told The Post: “I think it’s unfortunate for the country, I think the comments were destructive and demeaning and in some ways dangerous.” Read more »

Sen. Mike Rounds (R-SD)

“While I do wish both sides acted with more civility, I believe the president is attempting to point out their unproductive, anti-American criticisms of our country. It is a distraction from what we were sent here to do: advance issues that will improve the lives of hardworking American families,” Rounds said, according to the Argus Leader. Read more »

Rep. Chip Roy (R-TX)14 hours after Trump’s tweet

“POTUS was wrong to say any American citizen, whether in Congress or not, has any ‘home’ besides the U.S. But I just as strongly believe non-citizens who abuse our immigration laws should be sent home immediately, & Reps who refuse to defend America should be sent home 11/2020,” Roy tweeted. Read more »

Sen. Rick Scott (R-FL)

“It was not racist,” Scott said. “It was clearly not the way I would do it but let’s remember the position that these Democrats have taken. They’ve become the anti-Semitic party now and so that’s wrong. Our country is not anti-Semitic. They are attacking law enforcement, our border agents and ICE. That’s wrong. These people are doing their job.” Read more »

Sen. Tim Scott (R-SC)29 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Prior to this weekend, we saw the Democratic Party embroiled in racial controversy,” Scott said in a statement. “From Kamala Harris attacking Joe Biden on segregationists, to four black and brown women chastising Democratic leadership for attacking women of color, it is clear the Democratic Party has serious issues along these lines. Instead of sharing how the Democratic Party's far­left, pro-socialist policies - not to mention the hateful language some of their members have used towards law enforcement and Jews - are wrong for the future of our nation, the President interjected with unacceptable personal attacks and racially offensive language. No matter our political disagreements, aiming for the lowest common denominator will only divide our nation further.” Read more »

Rep. Austin Scott (R-GA)

“I voted NO on H.Res. 489 because plainly, I don’t believe @POTUS is a racist. I share the frustrations of the majority of Americans & my colleagues about the continued derogatory statements towards our country & unprofessional language & rhetoric coming from both sides. Uncivil discourse diminishes our ability to pass meaningful legislation that works to solve the challenges our country faces,” Scott tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Lloyd Smucker (R-PA)30 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Sometimes I disagree with my colleagues in the House on policy, especially the Democrat majority's veer towards socialism and recent left­wing approach on national security, immigration and healthcare. These debates are an intended function of Congress. However, racially-motivated statements or behavior is totally unacceptable and unbecoming of our great nation,” Smucker tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Pete Stauber (R-MN)

“Just last week, four freshman colleagues of mine publicly accused Speaker Pelosi of racism,” Stauber told the News Tribune. “This week, these same members are accusing the president of racism. I did not run for Congress to get distracted by the name-calling happening on both sides of the aisle.” Read more »

Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-NY)28 hours after Trump’s tweet

“While I strongly disagree with the tactics, policies, and rhetoric of the far-left socialist “Squad,” the President’s tweets were inappropriate, denigrating, and wrong. It is unacceptable to to tell legal U.S. citizens to go back to their home country,” Stefanik tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Chris Stewart (R-UT)

“Freedom of speech is a pillar of our democracy,” said a joint statement from Utah's three Republican congressmen. “We are not trying to censor President Trump or House Democrats. But, for the sake of not dividing our nation further, the inflammatory rhetoric needs to stop. From claims that ‘Nancy Pelosi is a racist’ to ‘Border agents are Nazis running concentration camps,’ it has gotten out of control. This resolution and these social media wars do nothing to unify our country and only take time and resources away from our true responsibility to get real legislative work done for the people of Utah.” Read more »

Rep. Steve Stivers (R-OH)30 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I condemn the President’s tweet calling on Members of Congress to go back to the ‘crime infested places from which they came.’ The constituents we represent sent us to Washington with a job to do – maintain our economic growth, fix our immigration system, and look out for our veterans, to start. Swapping insults on the Internet makes our jobs that much harder. The divisive rhetoric and personal attacks we’ve seen from the President and Members of the House over the weekend are unacceptable and stand directly in the way of progress,” Stivers tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Mac Thornberry (R-TX)

“The President’s comments were wrong. Many of the comments made by Members of Congress are wrong. All Americans, especially our leaders, should hold themselves to a high standard of discourse. Resolutions on the Floor of the House, however, are not the appropriate way to arbitrate between or to police inappropriate political rhetoric and the motives behind it. The nation faces many difficult challenges. Instead of focusing on messaging bills, we should focus on real solutions that move our country forward,” Thornberry said in a statement. Read more »

Sen. John Thune (R-SD)

"Democrats continue to talk about socialist fantasies that will drive up the cost and drive up everybody else's taxes. We're going to continue to focus on policies that are good for growth and good for jobs," Thune said at a press conference. In a later statement, he said, "I think the president needs to tone down the rhetoric, stop the personal attacks, rise above this kind of commentary and focus on the issues that matter to the American people," according to the Argus Leader. Read more »

Sen. Patrick J. Toomey (R-PA)

“President Trump was wrong to suggest that our left-wing congresswomen should go back to where they came from. Three of the four were born in America and the citizenship of all four is as valid as mine. I couldn't disagree more with these congresswomen's views on immigration, socialism, national security, and virtually every policy issue. But they are entitled to their opinions, however misguided they may be. We should defeat ideas on the merits, not on the basis of their ancestry.” Read more »

Rep. Ann Wagner (R-MO)

"We can disagree with one another on policy without resorting to name calling and other comments that make many Americans feel unwelcome in the nation they call home," Wagner told KMOX NewsRadio. Read more »

Rep. Greg Walden (R-OR)

“The President’s recent tweets do not reflect the values that we hold dear in America and they are comments that should not be made about any American citizen regardless of who they are or where they work,” Walden said, adding that statements from Democrats “distract from the real issues our nation faces, like the humanitarian crisis at the border, the rising cost of health care, and providing for our veterans and active duty military. Respectfully, Congress needs to stop wasting time bickering over mean tweets and get back to tackling the real problems facing our nation.” Read more »

Rep. Mark Walker (R-NC)

“We defeat socialism by highlighting its inequalities and failures, not the lineage of those who promote its failed policies,” Walker said. “In serving our minority communities, President Trump’s work is unparalleled. He should allow his actions to speak louder than his tweets.” Read more »

Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-IN)31 hours after Trump’s tweet

“As Americans, we can disagree on fundamental issues and condemn radical ideas without resorting to personal attacks on our fellow citizens. In order to find commonsense solutions to the challenges people face, both parties need to put aside divisive rhetoric and engage in a civil debate that reflects our nation’s values,” Walorski tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR)35 hours after Trump’s tweet

“The new socialist Democrats advocate ideas that will bankrupt American families, slow productivity and weaken our military; however, the president’s tweets weren’t about policy, and were unnecessarily demeaning. Governing well requires debating policies, not personalities,” Westerman tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Rob Wittman (R-VA)

“In no way do I approve of the President’s tweets he sent Sunday. They were demeaning, disunifying, and completely unnecessary. As a nation of immigrants, we should allow individuals to achieve the “American Dream” no matter their race, ethnicity, faith or country of origin,” Wittman tweeted. “That said, I could not vote in favor of the resolution before the House tonight. It was simply a messaging bill, and I believe the House must instead be in the business of getting things done. I am focused on getting real results for the American people - fixing our broken roads and bridges, expanding access to broadband in rural areas, lowering the price of prescription drugs, securing our borders, and rebuilding our nation’s military.” Read more »

Rep. Steve Womack (R-AR)

Trump's remarks “aren't defensible but nor is the rhetoric we've seen so many times coming out of the very people that he is directing his remarks toward,” Womack told The Post. “We need to move beyond the personalities and the social media war that's going on, and bring America's attention back on the critical issues facing our country,” he said. “Sometimes inflammatory remarks, off the cuff, have a tendency, I hesitate to use the word backfire, but serve counterintuitively to unite the other side. And look, it doesn't take a lot to unite the other side against our president.”

Rep. Ron Wright (R-TX)52 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I have been and remain a strong supporter of President Trump and his policies, which have been great for America, including and especially for our minority communities. However, I just as strongly disagree with the President’s tweet that four of my colleagues in the U.S. House, all Democrats, should go back to their families’ countries of origin. Notably, only one of the four immigrated to the U.S.; the others were born here. When one becomes a citizen of this country, it no longer matters where they came from. They are now Americans. The moment they are sworn in as citizens, the United States of America is their country. Unless they are one of the few that hold dual citizenship in another country, the only country they have to “go back to” is this one. As a conservative Republican, I disagree with these four colleagues on a great many issues, but telling them to leave the country because I disagree with them is not a solution. It, in fact, invites more political acrimony. At the same time, instead of voting on a resolution about the President’s tweets, we should be solving the illegal alien crisis at our southern border, reforming our unworkable immigration and asylum laws, and stopping the incessant flow of drugs and human trafficking across our borders once and for all. Ensuring the safety and security of the American people is far more important than partisan gimmicks about the President’s tweets.” Read more »

Rep. Robert B. Aderholt (R-AL)
Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN)

“I’m working as hard as I can on reducing healthcare costs. I’m not giving a daily commentary on the president’s tweets,” Alexander told CNN. Read more »

Rep. Rick Allen (R-GA)
Rep. Mark Amodei (R-NV)

“I have been consistent in my refusal to enter social media battles which are based largely on personalities. I didn’t do it when people were arguably critical of the Jewish faith or referred to the sitting President as a ‘MF-er’, and my refusal has been applied equally regardless of who the source of communication is. My energies and use of congressional resources will continue to focus on people’s health care, people’s immigration statuses, veterans, jobs, the economy, our troops, natural resources, and infrastructure, to name a few. Everyone have a nice day.” Read more »

Rep. Jodey Arrington (R-TX)
Rep. Jim Baird (R-IN)
Rep. Garland "Andy" Barr (R-KY)
Sen. John Barrasso (R-WY)
Rep. Jack Bergman (R-MI)
Rep. Andy Biggs (R-AZ)
Rep. Gus M. Bilirakis (R-FL)
Sen. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN)
Sen. John Boozman (R-AR)

“What our nation needs right now is for leaders to come together over the one thing that should unite all of us — the common recognition that America is the best, most prosperous and free country in the world — and work to make it even better,” he said in a written statement. “I have always found that disagreeing without being disagreeable provides the most opportunity to get things done. While we can vary on what policies we support, singling out people whose opinions differ from our own is bad for discourse and public civility,” Boozman told the Democrat-Gazette. Read more »

Rep. Mike Bost (R-IL)
Rep. Kevin Brady (R-TX)
Sen. Mike Braun (R-IN)33 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I think that President Trump and his style is going to be different from many of us, and of course we know that now. … I would moderate that, and I think that even though I think it’s part of your style to say what’s on your mind, I think increasingly as we get to November 2020, if we’re doing more of this, it’s going to hurt his case,” Braun told The Post. “The economy’s never been better and I don’t think we’re getting full credit for that. It was at a level that caught probably more attention than anything (tweets) recently, and again I think it takes away from the whole agenda and the effort of getting re-elected.”

Rep. Larry Bucshon (R-IN)
Rep. Ted Budd (R-NC)
Rep. Tim Burchett (R-TN)
Rep. Michael C. Burgess (R-TX)
Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC)
Rep. Ken Calvert (R-CA)
Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV)

“I think the whole back-and-forth is unproductive. Our time would be better spent figuring out ways to come together and find solutions to fix our broken immigration system,” Capito said, according to MetroNews. Read more »

Rep. John Carter (R-TX)
Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-LA)
Rep. Steve Chabot (R-OH)

“One of our nation’s greatest strengths is our diversity of backgrounds and opinions. We should work together on solutions to our problems, and we can disagree without being disagreeable,” Chabot said, according to the Dayton Daily News. Read more »

Rep. Michael Cloud (R-TX)
Rep. Chris Collins (R-NY)
Rep. K. Michael Conaway (R-TX)
Rep. Paul Cook (R-CA)
Sen. Mike Crapo (R-ID)
Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX)33 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I have a long-standing policy that I don’t comment on tweets," Cruz told reporters.

Rep. Neal Dunn (R-FL)
Sen. Mike Enzi (R-WY)
Rep. Ron Estes (R-KS)
Rep. Drew Ferguson (R-GA)
Sen. Deb Fischer (R-NE)
Rep. Jeff Fortenberry (R-NE)

“None of this is leading anywhere except to more division. Politicians must elevate what is good, promote the principles of justice, fight for what we believe in, and invite all to this proposition with care and respect,” Fortenberry said, according to the Scottsbluff Star-Herald. Read more »

Rep. Virginia Foxx (R-NC)
Rep. Russ Fulcher (R-ID)
Rep. Bob Gibbs (R-OH)
Rep. Kay Granger (R-TX)
Rep. Garret Graves (R-LA)
Rep. Tom Graves (R-GA)
Rep. Michael Guest (R-MS)
Rep. Brett Guthrie (R-KY)
Rep. Jim Hagedorn (R-MN)
Rep. Vicky Hartzler (R-MO)
Sen. Josh Hawley (R-MO)
Rep. Kevin Hern (R-OK)
Rep. George Holding (R-NC)
Rep. Trey Hollingsworth (R-IN)
Rep. Richard Hudson (R-NC)
Rep. Duncan D. Hunter (R-CA)
Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith (R-MS)
Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI)
Rep. Trent Kelly (R-MS)
Rep. Peter T. King (R-NY)
Rep. David Kustoff (R-TN)
Rep. Doug Lamborn (R-CO)
Rep. Robert E. Latta (R-OH)
Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT)
Rep. Debbie Lesko (R-AZ)
Rep. Blaine Luetkemeyer (R-MO)
Rep. Kenny Marchant (R-TX)
Rep. Roger Marshall (R-KS)
Rep. Brian Mast (R-FL)
Rep. Michael McCaul (R-TX)
Rep. Patrick T. McHenry (R-NC)
Sen. Martha McSally (R-AZ)
Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA)
Rep. Steven M. Palazzo (R-MS)
Rep. Greg Pence (R-IN)
Rep. Bill Posey (R-FL)
Rep. John Ratcliffe (R-TX)
Rep. Guy Reschenthaler (R-PA)
Rep. Tom Rice (R-SC)
Rep. Denver Riggleman (R-VA)
Sen. James E. Risch (R-ID)
Sen. Pat Roberts (R-KS)
Rep. Phil Roe (R-TN)
Rep. Francis Rooney (R-FL)
Rep. John Rose (R-TN)
Rep. John Rutherford (R-FL)
Sen. Ben Sasse (R-NE)
Rep. David Schweikert (R-AZ)
Rep. F. James Jr. Sensenbrenner (R-WI)
Sen. Richard C. Shelby (R-AL)
Rep. John Shimkus (R-IL)
Rep. Mike Simpson (R-ID)
Rep. Christopher H. Smith (R-NJ)
Rep. Ross Spano (R-FL)
Rep. Bryan Steil (R-WI)
Sen. Dan Sullivan (R-AK)
Rep. Van Taylor (R-TX)
Rep. Glenn Thompson (R-PA)
Sen. Thom Tillis (R-NC)

“The reality is I want to shift back onto the issues and the America that they represent versus the America that I want to see,” Tillis told reporters. “So I’m focused more on the issues and less on the communications of other people.” Read more »

Rep. William Timmons (R-SC)
Rep. Tim Walberg (R-MI)
Rep. Michael Waltz (R-FL)
Rep. Steve Watkins (R-KS)
Rep. Daniel Webster (R-FL)
Rep. Brad Wenstrup (R-OH)
Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS)
Rep. Roger Williams (R-TX)
Rep. Joe Wilson (R-SC)
Rep. Ted Yoho (R-FL)
Sen. Todd C. Young (R-IN)32 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I would say we oughta be focused on our policy solutions and the victories for the American people as opposed to people right now,” Young told The Post. “The economy is doing really well we’ve got all these federal judges on the bench that we should be proud of, people back home are really happy and that’s really what we need to focus on.”

Rep. Don Young (R-AK)

“I have strong respect for my colleagues across the aisle and appreciate the diverse backgrounds of this institution’s Members. In fact, our varied perspectives make us more responsive to the needs of a nation of many people. Frankly, we should be focusing our efforts on meaningful legislation for the people – not on non-binding resolutions that only contribute to partisan rancor. That is why I voted no,” Young said in a statement. Read more »

Rep. Ralph Abraham (R-LA)31 hours after Trump’s tweet

“There’s no question that the members of Congress that @realDonaldTrump called out have absolutely said anti-American and anti-Semitic things. I’ll pay for their tickets out of this country if they just tell me where they’d rather be,” Abraham tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Brian Babin (R-TX)

“There is not a racist bone in that man's body. And this is just identity politics at work,” Babin said on Sebastian Gorka's radio show. Read more »

Rep. Jim Banks (R-IN)33 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Until House Dems remove Rep. Ilhan Omar from the Foreign Affairs Committee or address her anti-Semitic remarks in any way, it’s hard to take any of their efforts to condemn the President, or anyone else, seriously,” Banks said. Read more »

Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL)

“And what the Democrats have done with President Trump’s texts is try to make it appear that his tweets were racial in nature, when in fact if you go through the tweets, he never mentions anybody’s skin pigmentation or anybody’s race,” Brooks told a Breitbart radio program. “And it’s quite clear the president’s tweets were motivated not by racism, but by a very strong disdain and dislike for socialism, for people that show such open hatred for America’s foundational principles, for people who openly dislike Israel or who are openly prejudiced against Jewish people.” Read more »

Rep. Bradley Byrne (R-AL)32 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I agree with @realDonaldTrump. America is an exceptional country and I'm proud to live here. If @AOC and the crew of Socialist Democrats are so angry with our country, I’m offering to pay for their ticket to Venezuela so they can enjoy their failed Socialist Paradise,” Byrne said. Read more »

Rep. Earl L. "Buddy" Carter (R-GA)

“I’m not as concerned about where people are from as I am about the radical agenda of the socialist wing of the Democratic party in Congress,” Carter said, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “The very public infighting among Democrats continues to escalate and it’s happening at the detriment of the American people.” Read more »

Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY)27 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Our opposition to our socialist colleagues isn’t because of their race, religion, or gender. It’s because their policies are dangerous, wrong, and would destroy America,” Cheney tweeted. At a press conference, she referred to comments made by Rep. Ayanna Pressley as racist. Read more »

Rep. Ben Cline (R-VA)

“What a sad display today on the House floor by the Democratic majority,” Cline wrote in a Facebook post. “Speaker Pelosi has allowed the people's House to be turned into a three-ringed circus. Even the temporary Speaker (a Democrat) abandoned the Chair in protest. We need to stop the partisan politics and start working together to address the critical issues facing this country.” Read more »

Rep. James Comer (R-KY)34 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I believe the president shares a lot of Americans' frustration with Congress, particularly those four women congressman who, for no other reason, constantly criticizes not only the president, but also Congress and our country,” Comer told PBS Newshour. “I think there's a level of frustration that the president has that he, unfortunately, took out in a probably not the best-worded tweet. But I think that the tweet has been overblown, and I think that we really need to move on and talk about the issues in Congress that the American people care about.” Read more »

Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR)

"I think what he sees is a lot of extremism from the House Democrats. ... The president is gonna tweet what he's gonna tweet." Read more »

Sen. Kevin Cramer (R-ND)

“I don’t believe Donald Trump is racist. He is an equal opportunity offender,” Cramer said, according to the Forum. Read more »

Rep. Eric A. "Rick" Crawford (R-AR)55 hours after Trump’s tweet

“This floor time was initially dedicated to vote on funding that our intelligence community is depending on. Instead we are spending it debating a resolution designed to embarrass @realDonaldTrump. #LetsGetToWork,” Crawford tweeted. Read more »

Sen. Steve Daines (R-MT)31 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Montanans are sick and tired of listening to anti-American, anti-Semite, radical Democrats trash our country and our ideals. This is America. We’re the greatest country in the world. I stand with @realdonaldtrump,” Daines tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Warren Davidson (R-OH)

"'Deeds not Words’ was the motto of my first infantry unit. I voted against this resolution. Political theater wastes time that could be better spent solving problems like the border crisis. Instead of solving problems, this Democrat-led Congress votes on things that cannot become law and do not address the underlying issues. Congress is falling short of the intent of our nation’s Founders. For Americans, Congress must do better,” Davidson said, according to cincinnati.com. Read more »

Rep. Scott DesJarlais (R-TN)

“Total chaos on the House Floor last night. The far-left has taken over. Agenda continues to be removing President from office, same as it ever was since the 2016 election. Impeachment, impeachment, impeachment... Because the socialist agenda is so unpopular!” DesJarlais tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Sean P. Duffy (R-WI)30 hours after Trump’s tweet

“The immigrants I know, including my mother-in-law, are the people most disgusted by Rep. Omar’s ingratitude to the nation who rescued her family from an African refugee camp and gave her the equivalent of a lottery ticket to come to the USA,” Duffy tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Jeff Duncan (R-SC)

“If the outrage was really over choice of words, Democrats would have condemned & censured Rep. Omar by name for her repeated & disgusting anti-Semitic & un-American comments. Tonight’s vote was a waste of time & taxpayer money, & it amounts to nothing more than a group therapy session for the radical Democrats who are still in disbelief @realDonaldTrump is the President,” Duncan tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Tom Emmer (R-MN)

According to the Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Emmer said the vote marked “the second time in six months House Democrats are considering legislation to condemn the remarks of elected officials rather than govern ... This back-and-forth is about politics, nothing more, and I hope Congress will start to worry less about ‘tweets’ and more about actual solutions to improve the lives of Americans.” Read more »

Rep. Charles J. "Chuck" Fleischmann (R-TN)

“The rhetoric in the People's House – slandering @POTUS – and continued vitriolic language from the radical left is not becoming of the greatest nation in the world,” Fleischmann said in a statement. “Policy discussions are what moves our country forward, and we need to remember that. The recent attacks against our greatest ally in the Middle East, Israel, defamation of our flag, and suggested abolishment of our law enforcement officers should outrage every American. Tonight's resolution is par for the course of the socialist Democratic party, and I voted against such political posturing. I was sent to Washington to legislate and make our nation a better place. That is what I will continue to spend my time doing.” Read more »

Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL)

“Dem-led House week in review: -Vote on mean tweets✅ -Failed impeachment vote✅ -@SpeakerPelosi debate ruled “out of order” by own party✅ Left unaddressed-nearly 5K storm our border daily, w/ no consequence & no end in sight We're losing our country & they're wasting our time,” Gaetz tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Greg Gianforte (R-MT)

“Greg is concerned less about where extreme liberal Democrats are from and more about their socialist agenda for socialized medicine, open borders, and a national gun registry. Greg will continue standing against socialism and working to protect our Montana way of life,” a Gianforte spokesman told the Missoulian. Read more »

Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-TX)

“Much ado about nothing as Shakespeare would've said. It's amazing how much ignorance there is about citizenship in the United States because in this great country, we have people that are citizens of every nationality, every race, every walk. All over. So when somebody talks in terms of American citizenship and America, they're talking about, not racism, they're talking about being proud of our country. And it used to not be a crime to be proud of being an American and proud of America,” Gohmert told a reporter. Read more »

Rep. Lance Gooden (R-TX)30 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Did @realDonaldTrump suggest America isn’t the home of my colleagues who have so far made a career out of playing the race card? I don’t think so. Does he mean to condemn their disparaging comments about America and anti-Semitic quips? Yes, and so do I,” Gooden tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Paul A. Gosar (R-AZ)55 hours after Trump’s tweet

Gosar referred to the Democrats as the “Four Horsewomen of the Apocalypse” in a tweet. Read more »

Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-SC)36 hours after Trump’s tweet

“We all know that AOC and this crowd are a bunch of communists. They hate Israel. They hate our own country ... They're anti-Semitic. They're anti-America,“ Graham told Fox News. He also told Trump to “aim higher. They are American citizens. They won an election. Take on their policies.“ Read more »

Rep. Sam Graves (R-MO)

“I just voted no on Nancy Pelosi’s nonbinding resolution condemning President Trump’s tweets. The House should move beyond these types of distractions and focus on more important things like helping our communities recover and rebuild from the Flood of 2019 prioritizing flood control, securing our border and stopping the radical agenda of the majority that would destroy our economy—which has been booming under President Trump,” Graves tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Mark Green (R-TN)53 hours after Trump’s tweet

Green criticized previous statements from the Democratic lawmakers in a series of tweets, saying, “The only colors @realdonaldtrump sees is red, white, and blue! But is this racist?” Read more »

Rep. Glenn Grothman (R-WI)

“I voted against it of course because I think it was a waste of time as well as I thought it was a mischaracterization of what President Trump said. I think the whole world wants to come in here and people want to fundamentally change America, it’s just ridiculous,” Grothman said, according to Wisconsin Radio Network. Read more »

Rep. Andy Harris (R-MD)25 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Clearly it’s not a racist comment,” Harris told Bryan Nehman on Baltimore talk radio WBAL. “He could have meant go back to the district they came from, to the neighborhood they came from.” Read more »

Rep. Clay Higgins (R-LA)

“These congresswomen have a history of anti-American and anti-Semitic remarks. They’re socialists who work harder for illegal immigrants than the American citizens that they are supposed to represent. The media has conveniently ignored this in a continued effort to demonize our president, who is at heart, a good man and solid patriot,” Higgins said, according to the Advocate. Read more »

Sen. James M. Inhofe (R-OK)33 hours after Trump’s tweet

“He’s never demonstrated a bias. And I just don’t think that he was doing that,” Inhofe told The Post. “That’s his way of communicating, so I don’t judge him on that. I just think that he’s communicating. He’s not doing it the way I would’ve done it. Well, let me tell you, if you’re for proper things for presidents to do, you’re talking about the wrong guy, because he hasn’t done anything that is the normal way of doing business. And that’s what people like about him.”

Rep. Bill Johnson (R-OH)

“Following up on the previous tweet. I'm happy to report that the House Democrat Majority passed legislation to expand rural broadband and upgrade America's roads and bridges...just kidding. Instead, House Democrats have moved on from a vote condemning the President's tweets to a vote holding Attorney General Barr and Commerce Secretary Ross in contempt for wanting to ask people if they're American citizens on the Census…a common sense question. I voted NO on this tax dollar-wasting political stunt,” Johnson tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH)31 hours after Trump’s tweet

Jordan told The Post that Trump is sick of the “ridiculous and dangerous statements of the left where they say illegals should get healthcare, where they say detention facilities are concentration camps, where they say walls are immoral, where they say abolish ICE, where they say abolish DHS, and I'm forgetting a bunch more ridiculous things they've said. ... That's the frustration the President has.”

Rep. John Joyce (R-PA)

"The debates that we have In Washington should focus on our policies. It Is my belief that four of my House colleagues support socialist, open border, and anti­semitic policies that are wrong for our country. The legislative agenda that they are trying to advance is one that I will continue to stand against, while also putting forward my own common sense conservative vision to keep us safe, grow our economy and lower the costs of healthcare,” Joyce said in a statement. “There are too many pressing issues facing the country for us to become distracted by empty resolutions that do nothing to make life better for the American people. Additionally, the text of this measure supports our current broken asylum system and does nothing to address the security and humanitarian crisis at our southern border. Therefore, I could not support today's resolution, and urge all of my colleagues to stop focusing on each other's rhetoric and to start prioritizing items such as the USCMA, fixing the loopholes in our immigration system and lowering prescription drug costs." Read more »

Rep. Fred Keller (R-PA)

“No country on the face of the Earth has provided more opportunity and freedom than the United States. Every member of Congress takes an oath to defend and protect the Constitution, but every day members of the House Democrats fail to live up to that basic responsibility. Rather than promote anti-Semitic and socialist policies that are contrary to American values, Democrats in Congress should instead focus on their core responsibilities to their constituents and put American citizens first,” Keller said in a statement, according to PennLive. Read more »

Rep. Mike Kelly (R-PA)

“You know, they talked about people of color. I’m a person of color. I’m white,” Kelly said, according to a Vice News reporter. He later told The Post, “My broader point in the five-minute long exchange was apparently lost, so let me say it again. It’s time to stop fixating on our differences — particularly our superficial ones — and focus on what unites us. Attempts by Democrats and the media to divide and define us by race are harmful to our nation’s strength. We need to elevate our level of discussion, and I believe most Americans agree.” Read more »

Rep. Steve King (R-IA)51 hours after Trump’s tweet

“.@SenJoniErnst it’s “not constructive” to advance AOC’s #MobSquad #FakeNews narrative against @realDonaldTrump whose policies have lifted up ALL Americans,” King tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Doug LaMalfa (R-CA)

“While Democrats apply a double standard to the President’s tweets that they do not apply to the actions of their own members, I will not play along. The President is not a racist, and those who would suggest otherwise are knowingly mischaracterizing his comments,” LaMalfa said in a statement, according to the Record Searchlight. Read more »

Rep. Billy Long (R-MO)

Long retweeted Sen. Steve Daines's tweet which said, “Montanans are sick and tired of listening to anti-American, anti-Semite, radical Democrats trash our country and our ideals. This is America. We’re the greatest country in the world. I stand with @realdonaldtrump. 🇺🇸” Read more »

Rep. Barry Loudermilk (R-GA)48 hours after Trump’s tweet

“ANTIFA attempted to blow up an ICE detention facility. But all the Democrats want to do today is to pass yet another resolution calling the President names. The rhetoric against our immigration officers must end, and Congress must address the border,” Loudermilk tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Frank D. Lucas (R-OK)

“Twice this past year, I have voted for resolutions in the hope to restore civil discourse and raise the bar of civility on the House Floor. But today, House Democrats voted to overturn House rules, so the Speaker could engage in personality attacks against the President. The use of hateful and insidious rhetoric has become incredibly routine, demeaning the values we’ve set for ourselves as a society. I refuse to be a part of an exercise that completely rejects civility in order to score political points. Tonight, I voted against the continuation of such offensive political practices. I believe it’s time that Congress deliver on its promises to the American people and rise above this harmful political rhetoric,” Lucas said in a statement. Read more »

Rep. Thomas Massie (R-KY)

“Constituents, “Did y’all get those post offices renamed yet?” Me, “No, we had more important things this week. We voted to condemn tweets.” #sassywithmassie,” Massie tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA)34 hours after Trump’s tweet

At a press conference, McCarthy said he did not consider Trump’s tweets to be racist. “I believe this is about ideology. It’s about socialism versus freedom,” he said. Earlier, when asked about Trump's tweets, he said “This is their country.” Read more »

Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC)57 hours after Trump’s tweet

“House Democrats do nothing on the border for 7 months, but are going to spend the entirety of today fighting for Speaker Pelosi’s ability to break House rules and call the President a racist on the floor. This is your Democrat majority,” Meadows tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Dan Meuser (R-PA)55 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I strongly oppose Democrat leadership’s latest effort to harass @realDonaldTrump. For years, he and his supporters have been subjected to baseless attacks. Such slander is a disservice to our nation and the American people, and I am tired of it,” Meuser tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Carol Miller (R-WV)56 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I went on the House Floor today to ask my colleagues across the aisle to stop playing political games and get to work on the real issues at stake. We must secure our border and end this humanitarian crisis,” Miller tweeted. Read more »

Rep. John Moolenaar (R-MI)

Moolenaar said the resolution “fails to account for inflammatory remarks made by some House Democrats,” according to MLive. Read more »

Rep. Alex Mooney (R-WV)

“Instead of passing another resolution falsely attacking President Donald Trump, Congress should come together and work with the President to secure the border,” Mooney told MetroNews. “I agree with President Trump that America is the greatest country the world has ever seen—something everyone living in America should be proud of. It is disappointing to hear politicians on the other side of the aisle continually attack American ideals and values without any Congressional Resolutions condemning them. There are those on the radical left that wish to turn us into a socialist country—I will continue to fight alongside the President to prevent that from happening.” Read more »

Rep. Markwayne Mullin (R-OK)

“No wonder the Democratic majority can’t get anything done. They just spent hours fighting about Speaker Pelosi’s ability to break the House rules and call the President a racist. This is ridiculous. Speaker Pelosi is not above the rules,” Mullin tweeted. He later added “From their resolution yesterday to impeachment today, the House is at a standstill. We have got to move on from these political stunts and do the work the American people sent us here to do.” Read more »

Rep. Ralph Norman (R-SC)34 hours after Trump’s tweet

Norman said Trump should “absolutely not” apologize. “The president is not a racist. The comments that people have made, the socialists that want to downgrade this country, let them go back to where they (pause) where they feel more at home. And I believe that,” he said.

Rep. Gary Palmer (R-AL)55 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Instead of wasting time debating Twitter comments, Congress should focus on addressing issues that are of greatest concern to Americans, including the crisis at the border. This is what we have been elected to do, not to be the social media police,” Palmer tweeted Read more »

Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY)

“I’m sort of dumbfounded how unappreciative she is of our country,” Paul said, according to WAVE 3 News. “She says this is terrible, a place without justice and all this. She’s a congresswoman. She got here as a refugee 20 years ago. She’s elected to Congress. I can’t imagine a better country that elected her to Congress and she badmouths our country,” Paul said. Read more »

Sen. David Perdue (R-GA)

"That's outrageous. Of course they're not racist," Perdue said, according to The Hill. Read more »

Rep. Scott Perry (R-PA)31 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I’m disappointed to find that many in the media are just awakening to the anti-American and anti-Semitic comments uttered consistently by some socialist leaders. I invite everyone to join me as we continue strengthening our Country and communities. #GodBlessAmerica,” Perry tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Mike D. Rogers (R-AL)56 hours after Trump’s tweet

ICYMI: Rogers Will Oppose Resolution Condemning President Trump #AL03 Read more »

Rep. David Rouzer (R-NC)

“No, I don’t think it’s racist,” Rouzer told the New York Times. Read more »

Rep. Steve Scalise (R-LA)

“What Nancy Pelosi just did on the House floor was disgraceful. We should be spending our time on the floor of the People's House solving actual problems—like the crisis at our southern border—not harassing @realDonaldTrump. I’ll be addressing the chamber shortly. Tune in!” Scalise tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Jason T. Smith (R-MO)57 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Those making a choice to now interpret tweets from @realDonaldTrump as racist are the same who have tried to stand in the way of his policies at every step. They are choosing to further a falsity they have pursued since the day he was elected President. Enough is enough, @realDonaldTrump tweet was not racist, and neither are his intentions. Like me, he is proud to live in a country where with hard work and humility, you can improve upon the circumstances into which you were born, where you can create your own way and your own path – I know I am. I join our President in wanting to stand side by side with the millions of Americans who are tired of seeing America get kicked around and are proud of our great country,” Smith tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Greg Steube (R-FL)

“It’s unbelievable that this group of four congresswomen are sparking outrage against the president when they have made anti-Semitic remarks and have called Speaker Pelosi a racist. Where was the outrage then?,” Steube said, according to the Sarasota Herald-Tribune. Read more »

Rep. Scott R. Tipton (R-CO)

“You’ve got the four folks accusing [House Speaker] Nancy Pelosi of racism. Now they’ve included the president in on that. I don’t think either of them were racist,” Tipton told the Colorado Independent. Read more »

Rep. Randy Weber (R-TX)

"I am tired of the constant politics of personal destruction. Disagreeing on policy decisions does not, nor should not equate to hate speech," said Weber, according to the Texas Tribune. Read more »

Rep. Lee Zeldin (R-NY)

“Anyone in the US w a blame America 1st mentality for everything needs to do some serious self reflection, especially if they are a Member of Congress,” Zeldin tweeted. Read more »

Condemned Trump’s remarks 19

Criticized Democrats and Trump 60

Have not commented/ Unclear/Dodged 109

Supported Trump’s remarks 62

Scroll to see a full list of names

Condemned Trump’s remarks 19

These lawmakers specifically condemned Trump’s remarks.

2 updates
Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick (R-PA)Y

Fitzpatrick broke with Republicans and supported a House resolution condemning Trump's comments. “As the Vice-Chair of the Bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus, Congressman Fitzpatrick has repeatedly stressed the critical need for civility in our discourse, from the kitchen table to the White House and everywhere in between. Pointing out differences in policy proposals is ok. Personal attacks on others are not ok,” Fitzpatrick said in a statement. Read more »

Rep. Will Hurd (R-TX)Y28 hours after Trump’s tweet

Hurd broke with Republicans and supported a House resolution condemning Trump's comments. “I think those tweets are racist and xenophobic,” Hurd told CNN. “They are also inaccurate, right. The four women he is referring to are actually citizens of the United States, three of the four were born here. It's also a behavior that's unbecoming of the leader of the free world. He should be talking about things that unite us, not divides us. And also, I think, politically, it doesn't help.” Read more »

Rep. Kelly Armstrong (R-ND)

“Engage them on policy all day long, but it just wrong to tell any U.S. citizen to ‘go back to where they came from,’ ” Armstrong said in a statement to the Forum. “Attacking any citizen based on where they are from is never OK.” Read more »

Rep. Troy Balderson (R-OH)30 hours after Trump’s tweet

To me, part of being patriotic means embracing the values laid out by our founding fathers. This includes being accepting of all races and cultures. Leaders of our great nation — including the President and all Members of Congress — should be held to high standards of decorum. Therefore I do not condone yesterday's tweets. Read more »

Rep. Tom Cole (R-OK)30 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I am deeply disappointed in the president’s comments directed toward fellow Americans and members of Congress. Use of such language is inappropriate and demeans the office of the presidency,” Cole tweeted. Read more »

Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX)

"I think what the President said was a mistake and an unforced error and that's about the total of my thoughts," Cornyn told CNN. "I don't think you are going to change somebody at this point in his life but hopefully he will, like all of us when we make a mistake, he'll learn from it." Read more »

Sen. Joni Ernst (R-IA)32 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Yeah I do [find Trump’s comments racist]. They’re American citizens,” Ernst said. “I personally think the GOP has a stronger platform to talk about. That’s what we should be focusing on.”

Rep. Mike Gallagher (R-WI)

"This week we will be voting on an intelligence authorization bill and a minimum wage bill on the House floor, but the only questions we will get asked, the only questions that will be debated on TV and social media, will be about tweets we can all agree were wrong. Instead of mean tweeting, let’s do our job and work to fix the looming budget crisis, a broken healthcare system, and a broken immigration system,” according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Read more »

Sen. Cory Gardner (R-CO)

“I disagree with the president. I wouldn’t have sent those tweets,” Gardner told KOA Newsradio. “I think he shouldn’t have done it. I think we ought to be focused on things and bringing this country together and moving this country forward.” Read more »

Rep. Bill Huizenga (R-MI)28 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I strongly disagree with what the President said in a series of tweets over the weekend. Every duly elected official needs to lead by example, end the personal character assassination attacks, and focus on finding ways to work together to make America the very best it can be.” Read more »

Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-GA)

Sen. Johnny Isakson said Trump’s comments were “totally inappropriate,” according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “I wasn't elected to make excuses or explain the statements of somebody else, and so I'm just not going to do that.” Read more »

Rep. David Joyce (R-OH)33 hours after Trump’s tweet

“What the President tweeted this weekend was wrong. It’s past time we all stop tearing each other down and focus our efforts on working together civilly to solve the challenges facing our country and build upon the success the American people have seen over the past few years,” Joyce tweeted. Read more »

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK)29 hours after Trump’s tweet

“There is no excuse for the president’s spiteful comments –they were absolutely unacceptable and this needs to stop,” Murkowski tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Pete Olson (R-TX)27 hours after Trump’s tweet

“The Tweet President Trump posted over the weekend about fellow Members of Congress are not reflective of the values of the 1,000,000+ people in Texas 22. We are proud to be the most diverse Congressional district in America. I urge our President immediately disavow his comments,” Olson tweeted. Read more »

Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH)28 hours after Trump’s tweet

“That’s not something I would say, and I think it’s divisive, unnecessary and wrong.” Read more »

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL)33 hours after Trump’s tweet

“The president shouldn’t have written that. I think it damages him. It damages the country, and none of us should be participants in identity politics,” Rubio told reporters. “I think the implication by anyone that you’re not as American as someone else because your parents were born somewhere else is ... directly counter to what makes America unique.” Read more »

Rep. Adrian Smith (R-NE)

"I do not agree with the President's tweets over the weekend. Our focus should be on constructive and thoughtful debate. We must work together to move forward as a nation," said Smith, according to Nebraska TV. Read more »

Rep. Michael R. Turner (R-OH)29 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I am confident that every Member of Congress is a committed American. @realDonaldTrump’s tweets from this weekend were racist and he should apologize. We must work as a country to rise above hate, not enable it,” Turner tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Rob Woodall (R-GA)

“[T]here is not a debate about whether or not it’s acceptable,” Woodall said of Trump's comments at a Rules Committee hearing. Read more »

Criticized Democrats and Trump 60

These lawmakers criticized Democrats and Trump in the same statement.

2 updates
Rep. Susan Brooks (R-IN)Y39 hours after Trump’s tweet

Brooks broke with Republicans and supported a House resolution condemning Trump's comments. “As Americans, there is more that unites us than divides us. The President's remarks to my colleagues across the aisle are inappropriate and do not reflect American values. ALL of our elected officials need to raise their level of civility in order to address the serious issues facing our country,” Brooks said. Read more »

Rep. Fred Upton (R-MI)Y27 hours after Trump’s tweet

Upton broke with Republicans and supported a House resolution condemning Trump's comments. “Frankly I’m appalled by the President's tweets. There’s no excuse. Inflammatory rhetoric from both sides of the aisle that is used to divide us just isn’t right. It’s not helpful. We have too many challenges facing us ... that we ought to be working on together – immigration, the debt ceiling, the border crisis. The President’s tweets were flat out wrong and uncalled for, and I would encourage my colleagues from both parties to stop talking so much and start governing more,” Upton tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Don Bacon (R-NE)30 hours after Trump’s tweet

I believe the President’s tweets toward the four Congresswomen were unacceptable. When it comes to their far-left policies and extreme ideologies, I strongly disagree with them. However, they are entitled to the views they campaigned and won on. Any hatred toward any nationality is repugnant, whether it comes from the left or the right. Having more civility and mutual respect and removing the contempt in our political debate are a must if we want to make progress in Washington. Read more »

Rep. Rob Bishop (R-UT)

“Freedom of speech is a pillar of our democracy,” said a joint statement from Utah's three Republican congressmen. “We are not trying to censor President Trump or House Democrats. But, for the sake of not dividing our nation further, the inflammatory rhetoric needs to stop. From claims that ‘Nancy Pelosi is a racist’ to ‘Border agents are Nazis running concentration camps,’ it has gotten out of control. This resolution and these social media wars do nothing to unify our country and only take time and resources away from our true responsibility to get real legislative work done for the people of Utah.” Read more »

Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO)28 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Just because the so-called squad constantly insults and attacks the president isn’t a reason to adopt their unacceptable tactics,” Blunt said in a statement. ”There is plenty to say about how destructive House Democrats’ policies would be for our economy, our health care system, and our security. I think that’s where the focus should be.” Read more »

Rep. Vern Buchanan (R-FL)

“If Speaker Nancy Pelosi put as much energy into addressing the country’s problems as she does in denouncing the president, we wouldn’t be facing a crisis at the southern border,” Buchanan said, according to the Sarasota Herald-Tribune. “While I don’t agree with everything the President tweets, Pelosi’s resolution on the House floor today is another example of why Washington is so dysfunctional.” Read more »

Rep. Ken Buck (R-CO)

“I think he is frustrated there are members of the House that are continually criticizing this country and affecting his ability to conduct foreign policy,” Buck told Fox News. “Do I think the president ... used the most diplomatic way of trying to address that? ... I don’t think he did.” Read more »

Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME)28 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I disagree strongly with many of the views and comments of some of the far-left members of the House Democratic Caucus – especially when it comes to their views on socialism, their anti-Semitic rhetoric, and their negative comments about law enforcement – but the President’s tweet that some Members of Congress should go back to the ‘places from which they came’ was way over the line, and he should take that down,” Collins said in a statement. Read more »

Rep. Douglas A. Collins (R-GA)33 hours after Trump’s tweet

“This Congress is off to a rough start,” Collins said. “Politicians throw verbal bombs that hurt people and fail to legislate to help people. ICE facilities are being attacked with weapons, and, a few days ago, we saw a foreign fllag raised over an American facility. The president is frustrated that Congress has not acted to solve the crisis at our border, and he expressed his frustrations in a way that didn't promote reconciliation across the aisle and across our country. This country is wide open to everyone who respects our laws and wants to share in our freedoms. It is my hope we can have productive dialogue to replace frustration with understanding and actually do what the people sent us here to do: solve problems like the border crisis.” Read more »

Rep. Dan Crenshaw (R-TX)33 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I don't like the rhetoric. I don't like the heated rhetoric. It's as simple as that.,“ Crenshaw told The Post. “I think everything that's come out of those women's mouths is generally very wrong and deeply offensive, but that doesn't mean we should stoop to that level.” He tweeted “I check if there’s a crazy comment I have to weigh in on daily. Rhetoric in politics is out of control ... POTUS shouldn’t suggest Congresswomen should leave because of their rhetoric. Exhausting.” Read more »

Rep. John Curtis (R-UT)

“Freedom of speech is a pillar of our democracy,” said a joint statement from Utah's three Republican congressmen. “We are not trying to censor President Trump or House Democrats. But, for the sake of not dividing our nation further, the inflammatory rhetoric needs to stop. From claims that ‘Nancy Pelosi is a racist’ to ‘Border agents are Nazis running concentration camps,’ it has gotten out of control. This resolution and these social media wars do nothing to unify our country and only take time and resources away from our true responsibility to get real legislative work done for the people of Utah.” Read more »

Rep. Rodney Davis (R-IL)

“We saw the outcome of over-the-top political rhetoric in 2017 when Republican members of Congress, including myself, were shot at on a baseball field, and over the weekend, when we saw another armed extremist attack at an ICE facility in Washington State,” Davis said, according to the Journal Star. “While I strongly oppose many of the positions advocated for by my colleagues and their statements about law enforcement, I disagree with the rhetoric used by President Trump. Personal attacks do more harm than good and allow the negative consequences of policies being pushed by far-left members of the Democratic caucus to be ignored.” Read more »

Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart (R-FL)33 hours after Trump’s tweet

"There's a lot of issues out there that I think are important to highlight and you know, I think the more we can focus on issues and less on the personalities, the better,” Diaz-Balart told The Post. “I understand what the president was getting at, which is I think he was expressing his frustration of folks not understanding the greatness of this country. However I think the use of words was unfortunate."

Rep. Bill Flores (R-TX)

“Let me be clear, though: I do disapprove of the president’s tweets from this weekend. But I don’t think it’s my job to go issuing statements or to issue further condemnation of any kind. I don’t think that furthers the process of working together as a Congress and as an executive branch moving forward. I’d like to see both sides dial down the rhetoric,” Flores said in a town hall, according to the Eagle newspaper in Bryan, Tex. Read more »

Rep. Anthony Gonzalez (R-OH)29 hours after Trump’s tweet

“While I disagree passionately with many of my colleagues on substantive policy issues, the comments from @POTUS yesterday were wildly inappropriate. That type of rhetoric only divides us when we need to be coming together to solve the real problems we face as a nation,” Gonzalez tweeted. Read more »

Sen. Charles E. Grassley (R-IA)

"Democratically-elected officials should avoid name-calling and be treated respectfully,” Grassley said, according to the Des Moines Register. “That’s true of these members of Congress and that’s true of the president.” Read more »

Rep. H. Morgan Griffith (R-VA)

“I have previously said that the President should tone down his Twitter rhetoric, and I would say that again,” Griffith tweeted. “I think he is correct to be unhappy when Members of Congress constantly talk of our country with disrespect. I grew up with Merle Haggard, who sang, "When they’re runnin’ down our country, man, they’re walkin’ on the fightin’ side of me." Read more »

Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler (R-WA)34 hours after Trump’s tweet

“While I disagree on most policy matters w/ the Dem. congresswomen who were the subject of the president’s tweets this wkd, we are all Americans – as is the president. We can & must defend our ideas on how to improve our country w/o descending into divisive & demeaning language,” Herrera Beutler said. Read more »

Rep. Jody Hice (R-GA)35 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I firmly believe that all people are made in the image of God and are equal in his eyes. I don't believe the president is a racist, and although I wish he had been more diplomatic, I share his frustrations in regard to Members of Congress making repeated derogatory statements about the Nation we love, serve, and defend,” Hice said. Read more »

Rep. French Hill (R-AR)32 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Like many Americans, I'm tired of the war of outrageous and ill-informed comments—from our president and other elected officials. This country needs less social media back-and-forth and more civil debate on policies that contribute to a stronger, more united nation,” Hill tweeted. Read more »

Sen. John Hoeven (R-ND)

Hoeven said he "wouldn't have said what the president tweeted" but called for a focus on "policy and issues. In that regard, I oppose policies like socialism and open borders, and believe we need to strongly support law enforcement," he said, according to the Forum. Read more »

Rep. Dusty Johnson (R-SD)31 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Like the President, I’ve vehemently disagreed with the far left members of the House on policy, but his inappropriate comments were the wrong way to communicate that disagreement. We need to focus on governing this country, and his tweets weren’t helpful,” Johnson tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Mike Johnson (R-LA)

“There's a lot of really kind of dangerous rhetoric flying around the Capitol right now. It's devolved into a bit of a circus ... We have forgotten just how to show basic respect and dignity to one another as fellow Americans,” Johnson told KEEL radio. “The biggest purveyors of that, to be very frank, and look at the record and you can see this, particularly in this incoming class, is the 'Squad' ... They go out and they launch verbal grenades every single day.” He referred to Trump's tweets as “unfortunate” adding “I just think that everyone just needs to tone it down.” Read more »

Rep. John Katko (R-NY)28 hours after Trump’s tweet

“The President’s tweets were wrong. I have vehemently criticized lawmakers on the far-left when I disagree with the direction in which they want to take the country – but criticism should focus on policy,” Katko said. Read more »

Sen. John Neely Kennedy (R-LA)33 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Rule No. 1 in politics is, when your opponent is screwing up you never interrupt them,” Kennedy told The Post. “I think Congresswoman Omar and her colleagues are destroying the Democratic Party. I’d just let them go do it. If I didn’t know better, I’d think they were all Republican plants.” He later told Fox News, “I don't think President Trump is a racist. I don't think his original tweet was racist. I think it was a poor choice of words, which is why he clarified.” Read more »

Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL)32 hours after Trump’s tweet

”We as a nation have to demand better from our elected officials, on both sides of the aisle,” Kinzinger said. “What the President tweeted this weekend was wrong, and does nothing but further divide us. We can and should debate the ideas and argue over different policies. But to denigrate those you disagree with, especially like this, is not reflective of the high honor and responsibility that the office of the Presidency carries. Seeing countless media folks threaten over the supposed “silence” yesterday also contributes to division in our country, with the near constant outcry that puts way too much value and unrealistic expectations on who says what on Twitter. To respond to every thing the President says, just to appease the masses, would be a full time job and not particularly beneficial to the people I represent in IL-16. They know where I stand, they know I have said time and again that I strongly disagree with the President on tone and his use of Twitter, and they know where my moral compass points. This is an ugly time for political discourse, and we must ALL work harder to improve it.” Read more »

Rep. Darin LaHood (R-IL)

“It is not the language that I would have used, but I believe the president and many constituents in my district are deeply disturbed by the new radical agenda that these socialist members in the House are pushing of open borders, elimination of ICE, government-run health care, and continued anti-Israel, anti-America rhetoric,” said LaHood, according to the Journal Star. Read more »

Sen. James Lankford (R-OK)

“As a nation, we can and should debate ideas and policies, but we should also acknowledge that we are all Americans. Both sides of this situation should choose to work on building trust instead of seeking to ‘one-up’ each other with increasingly caustic and racially charged comments,” Lankford said in a statement. “The American people sent us to Washington to stand up for their values and actually solve the problems we face. Escalating personal attacks do not help that already difficult process.” Read more »

Rep. Tom McClintock (R-CA)

“I wish the president were more temperate in the words he sometimes uses and I agree that the tone of his recent remarks was unnecessarily provocative. But his central point is irrefutable: There is no requirement for those who hate our country to remain here when there are so many countries with different principles and values to choose from that have in turn produced very different results,” McClintock said on the House floor. “This president spoke not of race, but of patriotism.” Read more »

Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY)

“The president is not a racist,” McConnell said at a press conference, but declined to directly answer repeated questions about whether his tweets were racist. He said everyone involved should “lower this incideniary rhetoric” and that it would be a mistake “to single out any segment of this.” Read more »

Rep. David B. McKinley (R-WV)

“Since the day he was sworn in, President Trump has been under relentless pressure from Democrats and the media,” McKinley told MetroNews. “It appears this pressure must have gotten the best of him with his inarticulate and counterproductive response over the weekend. We can highlight the extreme positions of the Democrats without resorting to comments like these. Both sides should tone down the rhetoric.” Read more »

Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA)

“The president’s tweets yesterday were wrong and distract from the discourse we’re having in this country about socialism,” McMorris Rodgers said, according to the Spokesman-Review. “Freedom-loving Americans will win this debate with the facts, not personal attacks: Capitalism has done more to lift people out of poverty and raise the standard of living than any other economic system in the world.” Read more »

Rep. Paul Mitchell (R-MI)26 hours after Trump’s tweet

“.@RealDonaldTrump, we must be better than comments like these. I share the political frustrations with some members of the other party, but these comments are beneath leaders,” Mitchell tweeted. Read more »

Sen. Jerry Moran (R-KS)

“My view is that the congresswomen who the president referred to are American citizens, they are elected officials. It is inappropriate to suggest they go home to any place – they are home,” Moran said, according to the Kansas City Star. He added that he disagrees with the Democrats on policy, but “there’s nothing to be gained by personal attack.” Read more »

Rep. Dan Newhouse (R-WA)

"I strongly disagree with the far-left ideals of my colleagues on the other side of the aisle, and I oppose most of their policy proposals - not because of their race, gender, or religion, but because I believe the socialist, anti-Semitic, and anti-American ideas expressed, accepted, and promoted by members of the Democrat majority are not right for the American people,” Newhouse told the Grant County Journal. “I do not believe President Trump nor Speaker Pelosi are racist, but as a member of the House Civility & Respect Caucus, I believe Members of Congress and the Executive Branch should maintain mutual level of respect for one another – regardless of disagreements. I empathize with my colleague, Representative Cleaver, in his frustration with both parties in Congress, who seemingly just want to fight. I look forward to working on real policy issues and legislative solutions that are priorities for my constituents in Central Washington."

Rep. Tom Reed (R-NY)

“Obviously the rhetoric is not good on both sides. The problem that I see is extremism. This extremist movement on the Left that is taking over the Democratic Party,” Reed told Fox Business. Read more »

Rep. Martha Roby (R-AL)57 hours after Trump’s tweet

“As elected officials, we owe it to this country and our political discourse to combat unseemly speech consistently and fairly, but Democratic leadership in the House has demonstrated they are only willing to call out members of the opposing party by name while sparing their own from the finger-pointing,” Roby said in a statement. “While I do not condone the President’s recent comments, I will vote against H. Res. 489 because I refuse to participate in this blatant political gamesmanship. Regardless of party affiliation, we must all treat one another with respect and civility in order to effectively do the important work of the American people.”

Rep. Harold Rogers (R-KY)

“I strongly disagree with the radical socialist policies presented by my colleagues across the aisle, and I share the President’s frustration that their rhetoric does not move the conversation forward," Rogers said, according to the Commonwealth Journal. "But we can disagree without being disagreeable, and this entire conversation is a distraction from the real and imminent problems confronting the United States." Read more »

Sen. Mitt Romney (R-UT)29 hours after Trump’s tweet

”I certainly feel a number of these new members of Congress have views that are not consistent with my experience and not consistent with building a strong America,” Romney told NBC10 Boston. “At the same time, I recognize that the president has a unique and noble calling to unite all Americans regardless of our creeds or race or place of our national origin and I think in that case, the president fell far short.” He later told The Post: “I think it’s unfortunate for the country, I think the comments were destructive and demeaning and in some ways dangerous.” Read more »

Sen. Mike Rounds (R-SD)

“While I do wish both sides acted with more civility, I believe the president is attempting to point out their unproductive, anti-American criticisms of our country. It is a distraction from what we were sent here to do: advance issues that will improve the lives of hardworking American families,” Rounds said, according to the Argus Leader. Read more »

Rep. Chip Roy (R-TX)14 hours after Trump’s tweet

“POTUS was wrong to say any American citizen, whether in Congress or not, has any ‘home’ besides the U.S. But I just as strongly believe non-citizens who abuse our immigration laws should be sent home immediately, & Reps who refuse to defend America should be sent home 11/2020,” Roy tweeted. Read more »

Sen. Rick Scott (R-FL)

“It was not racist,” Scott said. “It was clearly not the way I would do it but let’s remember the position that these Democrats have taken. They’ve become the anti-Semitic party now and so that’s wrong. Our country is not anti-Semitic. They are attacking law enforcement, our border agents and ICE. That’s wrong. These people are doing their job.” Read more »

Sen. Tim Scott (R-SC)29 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Prior to this weekend, we saw the Democratic Party embroiled in racial controversy,” Scott said in a statement. “From Kamala Harris attacking Joe Biden on segregationists, to four black and brown women chastising Democratic leadership for attacking women of color, it is clear the Democratic Party has serious issues along these lines. Instead of sharing how the Democratic Party's far­left, pro-socialist policies - not to mention the hateful language some of their members have used towards law enforcement and Jews - are wrong for the future of our nation, the President interjected with unacceptable personal attacks and racially offensive language. No matter our political disagreements, aiming for the lowest common denominator will only divide our nation further.” Read more »

Rep. Austin Scott (R-GA)

“I voted NO on H.Res. 489 because plainly, I don’t believe @POTUS is a racist. I share the frustrations of the majority of Americans & my colleagues about the continued derogatory statements towards our country & unprofessional language & rhetoric coming from both sides. Uncivil discourse diminishes our ability to pass meaningful legislation that works to solve the challenges our country faces,” Scott tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Lloyd Smucker (R-PA)30 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Sometimes I disagree with my colleagues in the House on policy, especially the Democrat majority's veer towards socialism and recent left­wing approach on national security, immigration and healthcare. These debates are an intended function of Congress. However, racially-motivated statements or behavior is totally unacceptable and unbecoming of our great nation,” Smucker tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Pete Stauber (R-MN)

“Just last week, four freshman colleagues of mine publicly accused Speaker Pelosi of racism,” Stauber told the News Tribune. “This week, these same members are accusing the president of racism. I did not run for Congress to get distracted by the name-calling happening on both sides of the aisle.” Read more »

Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-NY)28 hours after Trump’s tweet

“While I strongly disagree with the tactics, policies, and rhetoric of the far-left socialist “Squad,” the President’s tweets were inappropriate, denigrating, and wrong. It is unacceptable to to tell legal U.S. citizens to go back to their home country,” Stefanik tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Chris Stewart (R-UT)

“Freedom of speech is a pillar of our democracy,” said a joint statement from Utah's three Republican congressmen. “We are not trying to censor President Trump or House Democrats. But, for the sake of not dividing our nation further, the inflammatory rhetoric needs to stop. From claims that ‘Nancy Pelosi is a racist’ to ‘Border agents are Nazis running concentration camps,’ it has gotten out of control. This resolution and these social media wars do nothing to unify our country and only take time and resources away from our true responsibility to get real legislative work done for the people of Utah.” Read more »

Rep. Steve Stivers (R-OH)30 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I condemn the President’s tweet calling on Members of Congress to go back to the ‘crime infested places from which they came.’ The constituents we represent sent us to Washington with a job to do – maintain our economic growth, fix our immigration system, and look out for our veterans, to start. Swapping insults on the Internet makes our jobs that much harder. The divisive rhetoric and personal attacks we’ve seen from the President and Members of the House over the weekend are unacceptable and stand directly in the way of progress,” Stivers tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Mac Thornberry (R-TX)

“The President’s comments were wrong. Many of the comments made by Members of Congress are wrong. All Americans, especially our leaders, should hold themselves to a high standard of discourse. Resolutions on the Floor of the House, however, are not the appropriate way to arbitrate between or to police inappropriate political rhetoric and the motives behind it. The nation faces many difficult challenges. Instead of focusing on messaging bills, we should focus on real solutions that move our country forward,” Thornberry said in a statement. Read more »

Sen. John Thune (R-SD)

"Democrats continue to talk about socialist fantasies that will drive up the cost and drive up everybody else's taxes. We're going to continue to focus on policies that are good for growth and good for jobs," Thune said at a press conference. In a later statement, he said, "I think the president needs to tone down the rhetoric, stop the personal attacks, rise above this kind of commentary and focus on the issues that matter to the American people," according to the Argus Leader. Read more »

Sen. Patrick J. Toomey (R-PA)

“President Trump was wrong to suggest that our left-wing congresswomen should go back to where they came from. Three of the four were born in America and the citizenship of all four is as valid as mine. I couldn't disagree more with these congresswomen's views on immigration, socialism, national security, and virtually every policy issue. But they are entitled to their opinions, however misguided they may be. We should defeat ideas on the merits, not on the basis of their ancestry.” Read more »

Rep. Ann Wagner (R-MO)

"We can disagree with one another on policy without resorting to name calling and other comments that make many Americans feel unwelcome in the nation they call home," Wagner told KMOX NewsRadio. Read more »

Rep. Greg Walden (R-OR)

“The President’s recent tweets do not reflect the values that we hold dear in America and they are comments that should not be made about any American citizen regardless of who they are or where they work,” Walden said, adding that statements from Democrats “distract from the real issues our nation faces, like the humanitarian crisis at the border, the rising cost of health care, and providing for our veterans and active duty military. Respectfully, Congress needs to stop wasting time bickering over mean tweets and get back to tackling the real problems facing our nation.” Read more »

Rep. Mark Walker (R-NC)

“We defeat socialism by highlighting its inequalities and failures, not the lineage of those who promote its failed policies,” Walker said. “In serving our minority communities, President Trump’s work is unparalleled. He should allow his actions to speak louder than his tweets.” Read more »

Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-IN)31 hours after Trump’s tweet

“As Americans, we can disagree on fundamental issues and condemn radical ideas without resorting to personal attacks on our fellow citizens. In order to find commonsense solutions to the challenges people face, both parties need to put aside divisive rhetoric and engage in a civil debate that reflects our nation’s values,” Walorski tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR)35 hours after Trump’s tweet

“The new socialist Democrats advocate ideas that will bankrupt American families, slow productivity and weaken our military; however, the president’s tweets weren’t about policy, and were unnecessarily demeaning. Governing well requires debating policies, not personalities,” Westerman tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Rob Wittman (R-VA)

“In no way do I approve of the President’s tweets he sent Sunday. They were demeaning, disunifying, and completely unnecessary. As a nation of immigrants, we should allow individuals to achieve the “American Dream” no matter their race, ethnicity, faith or country of origin,” Wittman tweeted. “That said, I could not vote in favor of the resolution before the House tonight. It was simply a messaging bill, and I believe the House must instead be in the business of getting things done. I am focused on getting real results for the American people - fixing our broken roads and bridges, expanding access to broadband in rural areas, lowering the price of prescription drugs, securing our borders, and rebuilding our nation’s military.” Read more »

Rep. Steve Womack (R-AR)

Trump's remarks “aren't defensible but nor is the rhetoric we've seen so many times coming out of the very people that he is directing his remarks toward,” Womack told The Post. “We need to move beyond the personalities and the social media war that's going on, and bring America's attention back on the critical issues facing our country,” he said. “Sometimes inflammatory remarks, off the cuff, have a tendency, I hesitate to use the word backfire, but serve counterintuitively to unite the other side. And look, it doesn't take a lot to unite the other side against our president.”

Rep. Ron Wright (R-TX)52 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I have been and remain a strong supporter of President Trump and his policies, which have been great for America, including and especially for our minority communities. However, I just as strongly disagree with the President’s tweet that four of my colleagues in the U.S. House, all Democrats, should go back to their families’ countries of origin. Notably, only one of the four immigrated to the U.S.; the others were born here. When one becomes a citizen of this country, it no longer matters where they came from. They are now Americans. The moment they are sworn in as citizens, the United States of America is their country. Unless they are one of the few that hold dual citizenship in another country, the only country they have to “go back to” is this one. As a conservative Republican, I disagree with these four colleagues on a great many issues, but telling them to leave the country because I disagree with them is not a solution. It, in fact, invites more political acrimony. At the same time, instead of voting on a resolution about the President’s tweets, we should be solving the illegal alien crisis at our southern border, reforming our unworkable immigration and asylum laws, and stopping the incessant flow of drugs and human trafficking across our borders once and for all. Ensuring the safety and security of the American people is far more important than partisan gimmicks about the President’s tweets.” Read more »

Have not commented/ Unclear/Dodged 109

These lawmakers haven't commented or have given vague statements.

Rep. Robert B. Aderholt (R-AL)
Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN)

“I’m working as hard as I can on reducing healthcare costs. I’m not giving a daily commentary on the president’s tweets,” Alexander told CNN. Read more »

Rep. Rick Allen (R-GA)
Rep. Mark Amodei (R-NV)

“I have been consistent in my refusal to enter social media battles which are based largely on personalities. I didn’t do it when people were arguably critical of the Jewish faith or referred to the sitting President as a ‘MF-er’, and my refusal has been applied equally regardless of who the source of communication is. My energies and use of congressional resources will continue to focus on people’s health care, people’s immigration statuses, veterans, jobs, the economy, our troops, natural resources, and infrastructure, to name a few. Everyone have a nice day.” Read more »

Rep. Jodey Arrington (R-TX)
Rep. Jim Baird (R-IN)
Rep. Garland "Andy" Barr (R-KY)
Sen. John Barrasso (R-WY)
Rep. Jack Bergman (R-MI)
Rep. Andy Biggs (R-AZ)
Rep. Gus M. Bilirakis (R-FL)
Sen. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN)
Sen. John Boozman (R-AR)

“What our nation needs right now is for leaders to come together over the one thing that should unite all of us — the common recognition that America is the best, most prosperous and free country in the world — and work to make it even better,” he said in a written statement. “I have always found that disagreeing without being disagreeable provides the most opportunity to get things done. While we can vary on what policies we support, singling out people whose opinions differ from our own is bad for discourse and public civility,” Boozman told the Democrat-Gazette. Read more »

Rep. Mike Bost (R-IL)
Rep. Kevin Brady (R-TX)
Sen. Mike Braun (R-IN)33 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I think that President Trump and his style is going to be different from many of us, and of course we know that now. … I would moderate that, and I think that even though I think it’s part of your style to say what’s on your mind, I think increasingly as we get to November 2020, if we’re doing more of this, it’s going to hurt his case,” Braun told The Post. “The economy’s never been better and I don’t think we’re getting full credit for that. It was at a level that caught probably more attention than anything (tweets) recently, and again I think it takes away from the whole agenda and the effort of getting re-elected.”

Rep. Larry Bucshon (R-IN)
Rep. Ted Budd (R-NC)
Rep. Tim Burchett (R-TN)
Rep. Michael C. Burgess (R-TX)
Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC)
Rep. Ken Calvert (R-CA)
Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV)

“I think the whole back-and-forth is unproductive. Our time would be better spent figuring out ways to come together and find solutions to fix our broken immigration system,” Capito said, according to MetroNews. Read more »

Rep. John Carter (R-TX)
Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-LA)
Rep. Steve Chabot (R-OH)

“One of our nation’s greatest strengths is our diversity of backgrounds and opinions. We should work together on solutions to our problems, and we can disagree without being disagreeable,” Chabot said, according to the Dayton Daily News. Read more »

Rep. Michael Cloud (R-TX)
Rep. Chris Collins (R-NY)
Rep. K. Michael Conaway (R-TX)
Rep. Paul Cook (R-CA)
Sen. Mike Crapo (R-ID)
Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX)33 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I have a long-standing policy that I don’t comment on tweets," Cruz told reporters.

Rep. Neal Dunn (R-FL)
Sen. Mike Enzi (R-WY)
Rep. Ron Estes (R-KS)
Rep. Drew Ferguson (R-GA)
Sen. Deb Fischer (R-NE)
Rep. Jeff Fortenberry (R-NE)

“None of this is leading anywhere except to more division. Politicians must elevate what is good, promote the principles of justice, fight for what we believe in, and invite all to this proposition with care and respect,” Fortenberry said, according to the Scottsbluff Star-Herald. Read more »

Rep. Virginia Foxx (R-NC)
Rep. Russ Fulcher (R-ID)
Rep. Bob Gibbs (R-OH)
Rep. Kay Granger (R-TX)
Rep. Garret Graves (R-LA)
Rep. Tom Graves (R-GA)
Rep. Michael Guest (R-MS)
Rep. Brett Guthrie (R-KY)
Rep. Jim Hagedorn (R-MN)
Rep. Vicky Hartzler (R-MO)
Sen. Josh Hawley (R-MO)
Rep. Kevin Hern (R-OK)
Rep. George Holding (R-NC)
Rep. Trey Hollingsworth (R-IN)
Rep. Richard Hudson (R-NC)
Rep. Duncan D. Hunter (R-CA)
Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith (R-MS)
Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI)
Rep. Trent Kelly (R-MS)
Rep. Peter T. King (R-NY)
Rep. David Kustoff (R-TN)
Rep. Doug Lamborn (R-CO)
Rep. Robert E. Latta (R-OH)
Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT)
Rep. Debbie Lesko (R-AZ)
Rep. Blaine Luetkemeyer (R-MO)
Rep. Kenny Marchant (R-TX)
Rep. Roger Marshall (R-KS)
Rep. Brian Mast (R-FL)
Rep. Michael McCaul (R-TX)
Rep. Patrick T. McHenry (R-NC)
Sen. Martha McSally (R-AZ)
Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA)
Rep. Steven M. Palazzo (R-MS)
Rep. Greg Pence (R-IN)
Rep. Bill Posey (R-FL)
Rep. John Ratcliffe (R-TX)
Rep. Guy Reschenthaler (R-PA)
Rep. Tom Rice (R-SC)
Rep. Denver Riggleman (R-VA)
Sen. James E. Risch (R-ID)
Sen. Pat Roberts (R-KS)
Rep. Phil Roe (R-TN)
Rep. Francis Rooney (R-FL)
Rep. John Rose (R-TN)
Rep. John Rutherford (R-FL)
Sen. Ben Sasse (R-NE)
Rep. David Schweikert (R-AZ)
Rep. F. James Jr. Sensenbrenner (R-WI)
Sen. Richard C. Shelby (R-AL)
Rep. John Shimkus (R-IL)
Rep. Mike Simpson (R-ID)
Rep. Christopher H. Smith (R-NJ)
Rep. Ross Spano (R-FL)
Rep. Bryan Steil (R-WI)
Sen. Dan Sullivan (R-AK)
Rep. Van Taylor (R-TX)
Rep. Glenn Thompson (R-PA)
Sen. Thom Tillis (R-NC)

“The reality is I want to shift back onto the issues and the America that they represent versus the America that I want to see,” Tillis told reporters. “So I’m focused more on the issues and less on the communications of other people.” Read more »

Rep. William Timmons (R-SC)
Rep. Tim Walberg (R-MI)
Rep. Michael Waltz (R-FL)
Rep. Steve Watkins (R-KS)
Rep. Daniel Webster (R-FL)
Rep. Brad Wenstrup (R-OH)
Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS)
Rep. Roger Williams (R-TX)
Rep. Joe Wilson (R-SC)
Rep. Ted Yoho (R-FL)
Sen. Todd C. Young (R-IN)32 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I would say we oughta be focused on our policy solutions and the victories for the American people as opposed to people right now,” Young told The Post. “The economy is doing really well we’ve got all these federal judges on the bench that we should be proud of, people back home are really happy and that’s really what we need to focus on.”

Rep. Don Young (R-AK)

“I have strong respect for my colleagues across the aisle and appreciate the diverse backgrounds of this institution’s Members. In fact, our varied perspectives make us more responsive to the needs of a nation of many people. Frankly, we should be focusing our efforts on meaningful legislation for the people – not on non-binding resolutions that only contribute to partisan rancor. That is why I voted no,” Young said in a statement. Read more »

Supported Trump’s remarks 62

These lawmakers defended Trump’s remarks or focused criticism on Democratic lawmakers

Rep. Ralph Abraham (R-LA)31 hours after Trump’s tweet

“There’s no question that the members of Congress that @realDonaldTrump called out have absolutely said anti-American and anti-Semitic things. I’ll pay for their tickets out of this country if they just tell me where they’d rather be,” Abraham tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Brian Babin (R-TX)

“There is not a racist bone in that man's body. And this is just identity politics at work,” Babin said on Sebastian Gorka's radio show. Read more »

Rep. Jim Banks (R-IN)33 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Until House Dems remove Rep. Ilhan Omar from the Foreign Affairs Committee or address her anti-Semitic remarks in any way, it’s hard to take any of their efforts to condemn the President, or anyone else, seriously,” Banks said. Read more »

Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL)

“And what the Democrats have done with President Trump’s texts is try to make it appear that his tweets were racial in nature, when in fact if you go through the tweets, he never mentions anybody’s skin pigmentation or anybody’s race,” Brooks told a Breitbart radio program. “And it’s quite clear the president’s tweets were motivated not by racism, but by a very strong disdain and dislike for socialism, for people that show such open hatred for America’s foundational principles, for people who openly dislike Israel or who are openly prejudiced against Jewish people.” Read more »

Rep. Bradley Byrne (R-AL)32 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I agree with @realDonaldTrump. America is an exceptional country and I'm proud to live here. If @AOC and the crew of Socialist Democrats are so angry with our country, I’m offering to pay for their ticket to Venezuela so they can enjoy their failed Socialist Paradise,” Byrne said. Read more »

Rep. Earl L. "Buddy" Carter (R-GA)

“I’m not as concerned about where people are from as I am about the radical agenda of the socialist wing of the Democratic party in Congress,” Carter said, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “The very public infighting among Democrats continues to escalate and it’s happening at the detriment of the American people.” Read more »

Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY)27 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Our opposition to our socialist colleagues isn’t because of their race, religion, or gender. It’s because their policies are dangerous, wrong, and would destroy America,” Cheney tweeted. At a press conference, she referred to comments made by Rep. Ayanna Pressley as racist. Read more »

Rep. Ben Cline (R-VA)

“What a sad display today on the House floor by the Democratic majority,” Cline wrote in a Facebook post. “Speaker Pelosi has allowed the people's House to be turned into a three-ringed circus. Even the temporary Speaker (a Democrat) abandoned the Chair in protest. We need to stop the partisan politics and start working together to address the critical issues facing this country.” Read more »

Rep. James Comer (R-KY)34 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I believe the president shares a lot of Americans' frustration with Congress, particularly those four women congressman who, for no other reason, constantly criticizes not only the president, but also Congress and our country,” Comer told PBS Newshour. “I think there's a level of frustration that the president has that he, unfortunately, took out in a probably not the best-worded tweet. But I think that the tweet has been overblown, and I think that we really need to move on and talk about the issues in Congress that the American people care about.” Read more »

Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR)

"I think what he sees is a lot of extremism from the House Democrats. ... The president is gonna tweet what he's gonna tweet." Read more »

Sen. Kevin Cramer (R-ND)

“I don’t believe Donald Trump is racist. He is an equal opportunity offender,” Cramer said, according to the Forum. Read more »

Rep. Eric A. "Rick" Crawford (R-AR)55 hours after Trump’s tweet

“This floor time was initially dedicated to vote on funding that our intelligence community is depending on. Instead we are spending it debating a resolution designed to embarrass @realDonaldTrump. #LetsGetToWork,” Crawford tweeted. Read more »

Sen. Steve Daines (R-MT)31 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Montanans are sick and tired of listening to anti-American, anti-Semite, radical Democrats trash our country and our ideals. This is America. We’re the greatest country in the world. I stand with @realdonaldtrump,” Daines tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Warren Davidson (R-OH)

"'Deeds not Words’ was the motto of my first infantry unit. I voted against this resolution. Political theater wastes time that could be better spent solving problems like the border crisis. Instead of solving problems, this Democrat-led Congress votes on things that cannot become law and do not address the underlying issues. Congress is falling short of the intent of our nation’s Founders. For Americans, Congress must do better,” Davidson said, according to cincinnati.com. Read more »

Rep. Scott DesJarlais (R-TN)

“Total chaos on the House Floor last night. The far-left has taken over. Agenda continues to be removing President from office, same as it ever was since the 2016 election. Impeachment, impeachment, impeachment... Because the socialist agenda is so unpopular!” DesJarlais tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Sean P. Duffy (R-WI)30 hours after Trump’s tweet

“The immigrants I know, including my mother-in-law, are the people most disgusted by Rep. Omar’s ingratitude to the nation who rescued her family from an African refugee camp and gave her the equivalent of a lottery ticket to come to the USA,” Duffy tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Jeff Duncan (R-SC)

“If the outrage was really over choice of words, Democrats would have condemned & censured Rep. Omar by name for her repeated & disgusting anti-Semitic & un-American comments. Tonight’s vote was a waste of time & taxpayer money, & it amounts to nothing more than a group therapy session for the radical Democrats who are still in disbelief @realDonaldTrump is the President,” Duncan tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Tom Emmer (R-MN)

According to the Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Emmer said the vote marked “the second time in six months House Democrats are considering legislation to condemn the remarks of elected officials rather than govern ... This back-and-forth is about politics, nothing more, and I hope Congress will start to worry less about ‘tweets’ and more about actual solutions to improve the lives of Americans.” Read more »

Rep. Charles J. "Chuck" Fleischmann (R-TN)

“The rhetoric in the People's House – slandering @POTUS – and continued vitriolic language from the radical left is not becoming of the greatest nation in the world,” Fleischmann said in a statement. “Policy discussions are what moves our country forward, and we need to remember that. The recent attacks against our greatest ally in the Middle East, Israel, defamation of our flag, and suggested abolishment of our law enforcement officers should outrage every American. Tonight's resolution is par for the course of the socialist Democratic party, and I voted against such political posturing. I was sent to Washington to legislate and make our nation a better place. That is what I will continue to spend my time doing.” Read more »

Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL)

“Dem-led House week in review: -Vote on mean tweets✅ -Failed impeachment vote✅ -@SpeakerPelosi debate ruled “out of order” by own party✅ Left unaddressed-nearly 5K storm our border daily, w/ no consequence & no end in sight We're losing our country & they're wasting our time,” Gaetz tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Greg Gianforte (R-MT)

“Greg is concerned less about where extreme liberal Democrats are from and more about their socialist agenda for socialized medicine, open borders, and a national gun registry. Greg will continue standing against socialism and working to protect our Montana way of life,” a Gianforte spokesman told the Missoulian. Read more »

Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-TX)

“Much ado about nothing as Shakespeare would've said. It's amazing how much ignorance there is about citizenship in the United States because in this great country, we have people that are citizens of every nationality, every race, every walk. All over. So when somebody talks in terms of American citizenship and America, they're talking about, not racism, they're talking about being proud of our country. And it used to not be a crime to be proud of being an American and proud of America,” Gohmert told a reporter. Read more »

Rep. Lance Gooden (R-TX)30 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Did @realDonaldTrump suggest America isn’t the home of my colleagues who have so far made a career out of playing the race card? I don’t think so. Does he mean to condemn their disparaging comments about America and anti-Semitic quips? Yes, and so do I,” Gooden tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Paul A. Gosar (R-AZ)55 hours after Trump’s tweet

Gosar referred to the Democrats as the “Four Horsewomen of the Apocalypse” in a tweet. Read more »

Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-SC)36 hours after Trump’s tweet

“We all know that AOC and this crowd are a bunch of communists. They hate Israel. They hate our own country ... They're anti-Semitic. They're anti-America,“ Graham told Fox News. He also told Trump to “aim higher. They are American citizens. They won an election. Take on their policies.“ Read more »

Rep. Sam Graves (R-MO)

“I just voted no on Nancy Pelosi’s nonbinding resolution condemning President Trump’s tweets. The House should move beyond these types of distractions and focus on more important things like helping our communities recover and rebuild from the Flood of 2019 prioritizing flood control, securing our border and stopping the radical agenda of the majority that would destroy our economy—which has been booming under President Trump,” Graves tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Mark Green (R-TN)53 hours after Trump’s tweet

Green criticized previous statements from the Democratic lawmakers in a series of tweets, saying, “The only colors @realdonaldtrump sees is red, white, and blue! But is this racist?” Read more »

Rep. Glenn Grothman (R-WI)

“I voted against it of course because I think it was a waste of time as well as I thought it was a mischaracterization of what President Trump said. I think the whole world wants to come in here and people want to fundamentally change America, it’s just ridiculous,” Grothman said, according to Wisconsin Radio Network. Read more »

Rep. Andy Harris (R-MD)25 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Clearly it’s not a racist comment,” Harris told Bryan Nehman on Baltimore talk radio WBAL. “He could have meant go back to the district they came from, to the neighborhood they came from.” Read more »

Rep. Clay Higgins (R-LA)

“These congresswomen have a history of anti-American and anti-Semitic remarks. They’re socialists who work harder for illegal immigrants than the American citizens that they are supposed to represent. The media has conveniently ignored this in a continued effort to demonize our president, who is at heart, a good man and solid patriot,” Higgins said, according to the Advocate. Read more »

Sen. James M. Inhofe (R-OK)33 hours after Trump’s tweet

“He’s never demonstrated a bias. And I just don’t think that he was doing that,” Inhofe told The Post. “That’s his way of communicating, so I don’t judge him on that. I just think that he’s communicating. He’s not doing it the way I would’ve done it. Well, let me tell you, if you’re for proper things for presidents to do, you’re talking about the wrong guy, because he hasn’t done anything that is the normal way of doing business. And that’s what people like about him.”

Rep. Bill Johnson (R-OH)

“Following up on the previous tweet. I'm happy to report that the House Democrat Majority passed legislation to expand rural broadband and upgrade America's roads and bridges...just kidding. Instead, House Democrats have moved on from a vote condemning the President's tweets to a vote holding Attorney General Barr and Commerce Secretary Ross in contempt for wanting to ask people if they're American citizens on the Census…a common sense question. I voted NO on this tax dollar-wasting political stunt,” Johnson tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH)31 hours after Trump’s tweet

Jordan told The Post that Trump is sick of the “ridiculous and dangerous statements of the left where they say illegals should get healthcare, where they say detention facilities are concentration camps, where they say walls are immoral, where they say abolish ICE, where they say abolish DHS, and I'm forgetting a bunch more ridiculous things they've said. ... That's the frustration the President has.”

Rep. John Joyce (R-PA)

"The debates that we have In Washington should focus on our policies. It Is my belief that four of my House colleagues support socialist, open border, and anti­semitic policies that are wrong for our country. The legislative agenda that they are trying to advance is one that I will continue to stand against, while also putting forward my own common sense conservative vision to keep us safe, grow our economy and lower the costs of healthcare,” Joyce said in a statement. “There are too many pressing issues facing the country for us to become distracted by empty resolutions that do nothing to make life better for the American people. Additionally, the text of this measure supports our current broken asylum system and does nothing to address the security and humanitarian crisis at our southern border. Therefore, I could not support today's resolution, and urge all of my colleagues to stop focusing on each other's rhetoric and to start prioritizing items such as the USCMA, fixing the loopholes in our immigration system and lowering prescription drug costs." Read more »

Rep. Fred Keller (R-PA)

“No country on the face of the Earth has provided more opportunity and freedom than the United States. Every member of Congress takes an oath to defend and protect the Constitution, but every day members of the House Democrats fail to live up to that basic responsibility. Rather than promote anti-Semitic and socialist policies that are contrary to American values, Democrats in Congress should instead focus on their core responsibilities to their constituents and put American citizens first,” Keller said in a statement, according to PennLive. Read more »

Rep. Mike Kelly (R-PA)

“You know, they talked about people of color. I’m a person of color. I’m white,” Kelly said, according to a Vice News reporter. He later told The Post, “My broader point in the five-minute long exchange was apparently lost, so let me say it again. It’s time to stop fixating on our differences — particularly our superficial ones — and focus on what unites us. Attempts by Democrats and the media to divide and define us by race are harmful to our nation’s strength. We need to elevate our level of discussion, and I believe most Americans agree.” Read more »

Rep. Steve King (R-IA)51 hours after Trump’s tweet

“.@SenJoniErnst it’s “not constructive” to advance AOC’s #MobSquad #FakeNews narrative against @realDonaldTrump whose policies have lifted up ALL Americans,” King tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Doug LaMalfa (R-CA)

“While Democrats apply a double standard to the President’s tweets that they do not apply to the actions of their own members, I will not play along. The President is not a racist, and those who would suggest otherwise are knowingly mischaracterizing his comments,” LaMalfa said in a statement, according to the Record Searchlight. Read more »

Rep. Billy Long (R-MO)

Long retweeted Sen. Steve Daines's tweet which said, “Montanans are sick and tired of listening to anti-American, anti-Semite, radical Democrats trash our country and our ideals. This is America. We’re the greatest country in the world. I stand with @realdonaldtrump. 🇺🇸” Read more »

Rep. Barry Loudermilk (R-GA)48 hours after Trump’s tweet

“ANTIFA attempted to blow up an ICE detention facility. But all the Democrats want to do today is to pass yet another resolution calling the President names. The rhetoric against our immigration officers must end, and Congress must address the border,” Loudermilk tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Frank D. Lucas (R-OK)

“Twice this past year, I have voted for resolutions in the hope to restore civil discourse and raise the bar of civility on the House Floor. But today, House Democrats voted to overturn House rules, so the Speaker could engage in personality attacks against the President. The use of hateful and insidious rhetoric has become incredibly routine, demeaning the values we’ve set for ourselves as a society. I refuse to be a part of an exercise that completely rejects civility in order to score political points. Tonight, I voted against the continuation of such offensive political practices. I believe it’s time that Congress deliver on its promises to the American people and rise above this harmful political rhetoric,” Lucas said in a statement. Read more »

Rep. Thomas Massie (R-KY)

“Constituents, “Did y’all get those post offices renamed yet?” Me, “No, we had more important things this week. We voted to condemn tweets.” #sassywithmassie,” Massie tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA)34 hours after Trump’s tweet

At a press conference, McCarthy said he did not consider Trump’s tweets to be racist. “I believe this is about ideology. It’s about socialism versus freedom,” he said. Earlier, when asked about Trump's tweets, he said “This is their country.” Read more »

Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC)57 hours after Trump’s tweet

“House Democrats do nothing on the border for 7 months, but are going to spend the entirety of today fighting for Speaker Pelosi’s ability to break House rules and call the President a racist on the floor. This is your Democrat majority,” Meadows tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Dan Meuser (R-PA)55 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I strongly oppose Democrat leadership’s latest effort to harass @realDonaldTrump. For years, he and his supporters have been subjected to baseless attacks. Such slander is a disservice to our nation and the American people, and I am tired of it,” Meuser tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Carol Miller (R-WV)56 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I went on the House Floor today to ask my colleagues across the aisle to stop playing political games and get to work on the real issues at stake. We must secure our border and end this humanitarian crisis,” Miller tweeted. Read more »

Rep. John Moolenaar (R-MI)

Moolenaar said the resolution “fails to account for inflammatory remarks made by some House Democrats,” according to MLive. Read more »

Rep. Alex Mooney (R-WV)

“Instead of passing another resolution falsely attacking President Donald Trump, Congress should come together and work with the President to secure the border,” Mooney told MetroNews. “I agree with President Trump that America is the greatest country the world has ever seen—something everyone living in America should be proud of. It is disappointing to hear politicians on the other side of the aisle continually attack American ideals and values without any Congressional Resolutions condemning them. There are those on the radical left that wish to turn us into a socialist country—I will continue to fight alongside the President to prevent that from happening.” Read more »

Rep. Markwayne Mullin (R-OK)

“No wonder the Democratic majority can’t get anything done. They just spent hours fighting about Speaker Pelosi’s ability to break the House rules and call the President a racist. This is ridiculous. Speaker Pelosi is not above the rules,” Mullin tweeted. He later added “From their resolution yesterday to impeachment today, the House is at a standstill. We have got to move on from these political stunts and do the work the American people sent us here to do.” Read more »

Rep. Ralph Norman (R-SC)34 hours after Trump’s tweet

Norman said Trump should “absolutely not” apologize. “The president is not a racist. The comments that people have made, the socialists that want to downgrade this country, let them go back to where they (pause) where they feel more at home. And I believe that,” he said.

Rep. Gary Palmer (R-AL)55 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Instead of wasting time debating Twitter comments, Congress should focus on addressing issues that are of greatest concern to Americans, including the crisis at the border. This is what we have been elected to do, not to be the social media police,” Palmer tweeted Read more »

Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY)

“I’m sort of dumbfounded how unappreciative she is of our country,” Paul said, according to WAVE 3 News. “She says this is terrible, a place without justice and all this. She’s a congresswoman. She got here as a refugee 20 years ago. She’s elected to Congress. I can’t imagine a better country that elected her to Congress and she badmouths our country,” Paul said. Read more »

Sen. David Perdue (R-GA)

"That's outrageous. Of course they're not racist," Perdue said, according to The Hill. Read more »

Rep. Scott Perry (R-PA)31 hours after Trump’s tweet

“I’m disappointed to find that many in the media are just awakening to the anti-American and anti-Semitic comments uttered consistently by some socialist leaders. I invite everyone to join me as we continue strengthening our Country and communities. #GodBlessAmerica,” Perry tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Mike D. Rogers (R-AL)56 hours after Trump’s tweet

ICYMI: Rogers Will Oppose Resolution Condemning President Trump #AL03 Read more »

Rep. David Rouzer (R-NC)

“No, I don’t think it’s racist,” Rouzer told the New York Times. Read more »

Rep. Steve Scalise (R-LA)

“What Nancy Pelosi just did on the House floor was disgraceful. We should be spending our time on the floor of the People's House solving actual problems—like the crisis at our southern border—not harassing @realDonaldTrump. I’ll be addressing the chamber shortly. Tune in!” Scalise tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Jason T. Smith (R-MO)57 hours after Trump’s tweet

“Those making a choice to now interpret tweets from @realDonaldTrump as racist are the same who have tried to stand in the way of his policies at every step. They are choosing to further a falsity they have pursued since the day he was elected President. Enough is enough, @realDonaldTrump tweet was not racist, and neither are his intentions. Like me, he is proud to live in a country where with hard work and humility, you can improve upon the circumstances into which you were born, where you can create your own way and your own path – I know I am. I join our President in wanting to stand side by side with the millions of Americans who are tired of seeing America get kicked around and are proud of our great country,” Smith tweeted. Read more »

Rep. Greg Steube (R-FL)

“It’s unbelievable that this group of four congresswomen are sparking outrage against the president when they have made anti-Semitic remarks and have called Speaker Pelosi a racist. Where was the outrage then?,” Steube said, according to the Sarasota Herald-Tribune. Read more »

Rep. Scott R. Tipton (R-CO)

“You’ve got the four folks accusing [House Speaker] Nancy Pelosi of racism. Now they’ve included the president in on that. I don’t think either of them were racist,” Tipton told the Colorado Independent. Read more »

Rep. Randy Weber (R-TX)

"I am tired of the constant politics of personal destruction. Disagreeing on policy decisions does not, nor should not equate to hate speech," said Weber, according to the Texas Tribune. Read more »

Rep. Lee Zeldin (R-NY)

“Anyone in the US w a blame America 1st mentality for everything needs to do some serious self reflection, especially if they are a Member of Congress,” Zeldin tweeted. Read more »

Kevin Schaul

Kevin Schaul is a senior graphics editor for The Washington Post. He covers national politics and public policy using data and visuals.

Kevin Uhrmacher

Kevin Uhrmacher is a graphics editor for politics at The Washington Post. His work includes mapping trends in election results, analyzing data about President Trump’s political appointees and explaining the impact of congressional policies. He joined The Post in 2014 as a news designer.

Mike DeBonis, Paul Kane and Erica Werner contributed to this report.

About this story

Based on lawmaker statements and news reports. For statements where the time spoken was unclear, the number of hours since Trump’s tweet was calculated based on the approximate time the statement was reported.

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Originally published July 15, 2019.

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