At least
000,000
people have received one or both doses of the vaccine in the U.S.

This includes more than0,000,000 people who have been fully vaccinated.
0,000,000 doses have been distributed.

Data as of --- --- at 0:00
PLEASE NOTE

The Washington Post is providing this story for free so that all readers have access to this important information about the coronavirus. For more free stories, sign up for our Coronavirus Updates newsletter.

Data as of ET.

About two-thirds of the country has received at least one dose of a coronavirus vaccine and well over half of the country is fully vaccinated, according to the latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About 1 million doses per day are administered nationwide, far fewer than during the spring peak when vaccines first became widely available.

JurisdictionShare of population that has received at least one doseShare of population fully vaccinatedWeekly change in doses administered
U.S.
Note: The U.S. total includes doses provided to Republic of Palau, Federated States of Micronesia and the Marshall Islands, as US-affiliated Pacific Islands. The CDC is underreporting vaccinations in Utah by 100,000 people.

All adults have been eligible for a shot since April, and almost 17 million children, as young as 12, have been eligible for a coronavirus vaccine since May.

[For unvaccinated, coronavirus is soaring again]

Public health and government leaders said that racial and ethnic equity would be critical in distributing vaccines, but data collection on the race of recipients has been poor.

These charts show the percent of the population in each racial or ethnic group that has received a vaccine so far. Alaskan Native and Native American populations have a higher rate of vaccination, which tribal leaders have attributed to their sovereignty and emphasis on prioritizing elders and their communities. Because so much race information is missing, vaccine rates for each group is understated.

The risk of hospitalization and death from covid-19 rises with age, and vaccination rates have followed that pattern, with prioritization for people in nursing homes and for older Americans.

[Tracking coronavirus cases, deaths and vaccinations worldwide]

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

District of Columbia

The District of Columbia has vaccinated a sizable number of nonresidents as many health-care workers and other essential workers, including teachers and school staff, commute into the District from neighboring states for work.

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

About this story

By Dan Keating, Naema Ahmed, Garland Potts, Monica Ulmanu, Jessica Wolfrom. Jacqueline Dupree, Peter Andringa, John Muyskens, Lizzy Raben contributed to this report.

Contact us at vaccinationtracker@washpost.com.

Originally published Dec. 11, 2020.

Methodology

The number of vaccines allocated to each state, the count of doses distributed and the count of doses administered are from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Doses are also being distributed to the Defense Department, State Department, Department of Veterans Affairs, Federal Bureau of Prisons, Department of Homeland Security and Indian Health Service. On Feb. 19, the CDC altered its reporting of doses being administered by the Department of Defense, Bureau of Prisons, Indian Health Service and Veteran’s Health Administration. The CDC added the shots given by those agencies to the states where the shots had been given. It didn’t change the national total, but it added two million shots to various state totals. The shots had been administered over two-and-a-half months, but they were all reported on Feb. 19, causing large one-day increases in Virginia, New Mexico, North Dakota, Texas, Massachusetts, Connecticut and other states.