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Fall TV Preview 2015

Every new show, the schedule for every returning show, and what’s worth watching

Earlier this year, in one of my more chin-scratching moods, I wrote a long essay wondering if we might have left the Golden Age of TV and settled into something more like a Silver Age, in which most new shows — whether they’re on old-school commercial networks or come as original output from streaming providers — are all “pretty good,” or at least reaching a certain base level. In the Silver Age, there’s plenty of quality writing, acting and heightened production values, but how much of it is really, truly can’t-miss TV?

This fall’s new shows hold true to that premise: In reviewing 28 new series here as I do each year, I find myself doling out just one A (to CBS’s “Supergirl”) and only one F (to ABC’s “Blood & Oil”), followed by a whole lot of B’s. These are not inflated B’s reflecting some lenient curve — they’re honest B’s. Creators and writers are coming up with shows that are ably filling some niche, checking off some box. Nothing too dazzling, but nothing that says “Death of TV.”

There’s plenty of talk already about the death of TV. This is a good fall season to keep enjoying it while it lasts, in an ever-increasing number of shows, in whichever format you prefer.

Featured review:

Jump down to:

New shows

Supergirl

Supergirl

A-

The Grinder

The Grinder

B+

Life in Pieces

Life in Pieces

B+

Limitless

Limitless

B+

The Man in the High Castle

The Man in the High Castle

B+

Masterpiece: Home Fires

Masterpiece: Home Fires

B+

Angel From Hell

Angel From Hell

B

The Bastard Executioner

The Bastard Executioner

B

Crazy Ex-Girlfriend

Crazy Ex-Girlfriend

B

The Last Kingdom

The Last Kingdom

B

The Muppets

The Muppets

B

Quantico

Quantico

B

Code Black

Code Black

B-

Flesh and Bone

Flesh and Bone

B-

Grandfathered

Grandfathered

B-

Heroes Reborn

Heroes Reborn

C+

Masterpiece: Indian Summers

Masterpiece: Indian Summers

C+

Minority Report

Minority Report

C

Red Oaks

Red Oaks

C

Scream Queens

Scream Queens

C

Dr. Ken

Dr. Ken

C-

Blindspot

Blindspot

D+

The Player

The Player

D+

Rosewood

Rosewood

D

Truth Be Told

Truth Be Told

D

Blood & Oil

Blood & Oil

F

Wicked City

Wicked City

F

Chicago Med

Chicago Med

TBD

Supergirl

A-

Premiere date: Monday, Oct. 26

Time: 8:30 on CBS

As a tweenage Kryptonian, Kara Zor-El was sent in a follow-up rocket to babysit her infant cousin Kal-El. Her ship got waylaid in a time warp; by the time she lands on Earth, her cousin has surpassed her and grown into the world-revered Superman. He places her with a kindly adoptive pair of scientist parents.

Now a young woman, Kara Danvers (Melissa Benoist) lives in National City and works as the awkward, put-upon assistant of a demanding, “Devil Wears Prada”-style media magnate, Cat Grant (Calista Flockhart). Like all 20-somethings, Kara wonders if she’s making the most out of her potential. After she rescues a burning jetliner, it becomes clear that she ought to follow in cousin Kal’s contrails; soon enough, she dons a red cape and encounters her first fearsome enemy, one of many alien criminals who’ve escaped the same time warp that once imprisoned her.

“Supergirl,” which is co-produced by prolific show runner Greg Berlanti (“Arrow,” “The Flash,” “The Mysteries of Laura”), is a cheerful and spot-on adaptation, skillfully accomplishing the difficult task of making a corny comic-book story seem not only believable but also welcoming to those who’ve tired (or never enjoyed) the genre. Benoist couldn’t be more suited to the part, which, like playing Superman, requires just as much (if not more) skill at playing the adorkable alter ego. In Kara’s case, that line is blurrier — she’s sometimes at her strongest while in the office. In fact, the only time she backs down is while protesting her boss’s sexist impulse to give National City’s new heroine the name Supergirl instead of Superwoman. (For my money, she surrenders that fight too easily.)

Throughout the recent explosion of superhero everything, fans have ached to see someone bring forth a noble reboot of Wonder Woman. Perhaps we were holding out for the wrong heroine. Let’s hear it for Supergirl!

The Grinder

B+

Premiere date: Tuesday, Sept. 29

Time: 8:30 on Fox

With Rob Lowe’s dramatic acting career long ago rescued by his self-effacing comic chops, his handsome mug is pretty much welcome to any sitcom attempt. In Fox’s “The Grinder,” Lowe plays Dean Sanderson, the middle-aged star of a successful “Law & Order”-type procedural called “The Grinder.” On TV, the Grinder is one of those attorneys who bends the rules and never fails to save the day in the final seconds.

But now that “The Grinder” has reached its finale, Dean finds himself adrift. Visiting his family in Boise, where his father (William Devane) and younger brother Stewart (Fred Savage) have made careers as attorneys (the kind with actual law degrees), Dean has a sudden inspiration: He should move home and practice law. Tagging along on a eviction case with Stewart, Dean declares with “Grinder”-like gravitas to his brother’s star-struck clients: “Right now, this case is all about apartments, the rent. But what it should be about is character.”

We’re used to seeing Lowe ham it up as a stud whose vanity knows no bounds — and it’s still funny. But “The Grinder’s” secret weapon is the return of Savage (since “The Wonder Years,” he’s mostly worked behind the camera as a director), who runs away with the pilot episode, giving probably the best network comedy performance in this fall’s crop.

Stewart’s anxiety about living in his brother’s considerable shadow — compounded by the fact that even his wife, Debbie (Mary Elizabeth Ellis), once dated Dean — turns out to be a more interesting thread than the notion of a TV star moving back home. Either way, the writing is breezy and the cast seems to be having fun — so I rest my case.

Life in Pieces

B+

Premiere date: Monday, Sept. 21

Time: 8:30 on CBS

If NBC’s “Parenthood” had chosen the half-hour comedy track instead of morphing into a weepy (but certainly beloved) one-hour drama, the results would have probably looked like CBS’s appealing “Life in Pieces,” a humorous bit of quick portraiture on three adult siblings, Greg, Heather and Matt (Colin Hanks; “Breaking Bad’s” Betsy Brandt; and “The Newsroom’s” Thomas Sadoski), and their retired parents, John and Joan (James Brolin and Dianne Wiest), along with attendant spouses, children and exes.

“Modern Family” also comes to mind (minus the mockumentary-style asides), with single-camera pacing and overall vibe. In the first episode, we don’t get a whole lot of explanation of who these people are, which doesn’t matter, because they are by now familiar staples of nearly all Hollywood depictions of families: They are white, nebulously well off (but not rich) and blessed with bantering skills that only a roomful of talented writers could provide. Their problems all are mostly of the First World variety: Heather’s little girl, Sophia (Giselle Eisenberg), grapples with news from her older sister that there is no Santa Claus, while Greg consoles his wife, Jen (Zoe Lister-Jones), about the condition of her vagina after giving birth to their baby daughter.

“Life in Pieces” is a good swerve from CBS’s allegiance to the Chuck Lorre-style multi-camera sitcom, and the cast is a sturdy gang of seasoned pros (it’s particularly pleasing to see Wiest in a comedy). And though they’ve probably got nothing new to tell us about family dynamics, sentimental moments and delicate rites of passage, they seem like nice people to have around for a few laughs.

Limitless

B+

Premiere date: Tuesday, Sept. 22

Time: 10 on CBS

Let’s not give the movie industry too many wild ideas: Not every forgotten action thriller would or could translate to a TV series pilot as well as “Limitless” (based on a came-and-went 2011 flick starring Bradley Cooper). Something about this show just works from the crisply polished start, using a premise that is squarely within one of CBS’s favorite wheelhouses — the edgy hero who is gifted with extraordinary mental powers that he or she directs to the purpose of solving crime. (See “The Mentalist,” “Unforgettable,” “Elementary” and so on.)

Here, that super-sleuth would be Brian Finch (Jake McDorman), a frustrated New York musician who is approaching 30 and still hasn’t figured out what to do with his life. While slogging through a temp filing job at a big brokerage firm, Brian’s old friend Eli slips him a miracle pill and the world opens wide: His brain is now operating at 100 percent, enabling him to remember everything he’s ever seen or read.

But the effects wear off after 12 hours. Brian’s source turns up dead, and now FBI agent Rebecca Harris (“Dexter’s” Jennifer Carpenter) is pursuing him for murder. Brian eventually gets the lowdown about the pill and an antidote for its nasty side-effects from Cooper’s film character (the actor is also a co-producer on the series). McDorman, who was seen last season on ABC’s romantic comedy flop “Manhattan Love Story,” makes for an engaging, believable slacker-protagonist. Tentatively allied with Harris, Brian can now further explore life as a know-it-all — a dream come true for any millennial.

I can hear you asking: Won’t it just kind of become the same thing over and over? Of course it will. And since when has that ever been an issue for CBS (or its viewers)?

The Man in the High Castle

B+

Premiere date: Friday, Nov. 20

Time: on Amazon streaming

Based on a Philip K. Dick story and probably the most intriguing drama pilot on the fall slate, Amazon’s “The Man in the High Castle” sets off on a fascinating — if depressing — premise: It’s 1962 and the United States is under the control of its World War II conquerors. Everything west of the Rockies has been renamed the Japanese Pacific States; east of there, it’s called the Greater Nazi Reich. Germany invented the H-bomb and destroyed Washington, D.C., in 1945, bringing about a U.S. surrender. Since then, a tentative — and fascist — peace has settled over the land.

On opposite coasts, two young Americans fall into a resistance scheme: Professing that he wants his country back, Joe Blake (Luke Kleintank) agrees to drive a moving van filled with secret cargo from New York to Canon City, Colo., which now sits in the neutral zone between German and Japanese territories. In San Francisco, Juliana Crain (Alexa Davalos) impulsively boards a bus to Canon City to keep an appointment meant for her now-murdered stepsister. Both Joe and Juliana are in possession of outlawed newsreels — directed by the mysterious Man in the High Castle — that purport to show that the United States was victorious in the war.

Although the writing and storytelling in the first episode (which Amazon first shared with its Prime customers earlier this year) come off a little clumsily, overall it’s a strong launch for an espionage series. “The Man in the High Castle” is also expertly and realistically imagined — shot in drab and dour hues that reveal a nation and a society in a dejected condition. It’s also an interesting metaphor to consider in the present day, as a leading, bellicose presidential candidate keeps promising to restore America to a former glory. That’s what Joe said, too.

Masterpiece: Home Fires

B+

Premiere date: Sunday, Oct. 4

Time: 8 on PBS

What could be sweeter — and more in PBS “Masterpiece’s” sweet spot — than a six-part miniseries about a group of resolute women in rural Cheshire County, England, who, at the outset of World War II, decide to pick blackberries and make jam for the patriotic cause? This series is spoonful after spoonful of splendid jahm.

As with the efficiently sunny PBS hit “Call the Midwife” (the only known antidote to TV’s Golden Age of relentlessly violent antiheroes), “Home Fires” knows precisely how much tragedy and personal crises its characters (and viewers) can bear. Bad things happen (there’s a war on, after all), but with nowhere near the degree of travesty you see on other shows. There are subplots of unrequited love, criminal behavior, infidelity, terminal illness, deep grief and profound fear — all of it seeming quaint and quite dear. People are awful to one another, but never too awful — except in the case of the frustrated writer (Mark Bazeley) who verbally and physically abuses his wife (Claire Rushbrook). And don’t worry too much about that because “Home Fires” is the kind of show that guarantees he’ll soon get his.

Samantha Bond (Lady Rosamund of “Downton Abbey”) leads the large cast as Frances Barden, head of the local chapter of the Women’s Institute (sort of like the Junior League), who faces off with her stuffy rival (Francesca Annis) to convert the chapter from a ladies’ lunch club to a rolled-up-sleeves battalion of do-gooders ready to plant victory gardens, raise money for ambulances and build a village bomb shelter.

Created by Simon Block and based on historian Julie Summers’s book, “Jambusters,” “Home Fires” is noticeably cheesy in parts (feel free to enhance your fun by supplying arch commentary to the dialogue), but it’s easily absorbing. Also, for those paying close attention, the series is a contextually and satisfyingly feminist take on war.

Angel From Hell

B

Premiere date: Originally scheduled for Nov. 5; pushed to February 2016.

Time: 9:30 on CBS

CBS’s idea of what a guardian angel is sure isn’t what it once was back in the Roma Downey and Della Reese days. In this dryly humored and cuckoo half-hour comedy, “Glee’s” Jane Lynch gets to spread her sardonic wings as Amy, a flask-swigging guardian angel who needs to prove herself worthy of the title.

Breaking whatever wall stands between humans and angels, Amy reaches out to the soul she’s supposed to be protecting, a dermatologist named Allison (Maggie Lawson) who is still grieving the death of her mother a year or so back (“412 days,” Amy notes).

Coming across as a possibly deranged street magician, Amy is no one’s idea of a heavenly presence, but her seeming prescience convinces Allison that her boyfriend is cheating on her and that her workaholism is a form of overcompensation and a need to always please others. Amy is also good for laughs: “Would it cheer you up to know there’s a taquito behind your ear?” she asks, producing (and munching on) said snack.

This is another one of those pilot episodes where it’s not easy to tell how quickly the fun will fizz out. Unlike George Burns in the old “Oh, God!” movies, Amy is visible to everyone around her — not only Allison, but also Allison’s father (Kevin Pollak) and brother (Kyle Bornheimer), so at least one of the usual ethereal-being comedy conventions doesn’t really apply. What remains is a watchable and weird story (thanks mainly to Lynch, whose gifts for line-delivery verge on the divine) about an intuitive new friend showing up just when she’s most needed.

The Bastard Executioner

B

Premiere date: Tuesdays, premiered Sept. 15

Time: 10 p.m. on FX

Well, what would you do as a follow-up to “Sons of Anarchy”? In a number of ways, creator/writer Kurt Sutter’s surprising swerve with “The Bastard Executioner,” which is set in the 14th century, makes perfect sense: The milieu is certainly as violent — if not more so — than the gritty California biker-gang saga that became Sutter’s magnum opus, but it is also different enough to give this show an experimental edge.

Sutter and his players (including his wife, Katey Sagal, this time playing Annora of the Alders, a spooky, nomadic soothsayer) have certainly thrown themselves headlong into this highly imaginative story set in the wake of the Edwardian Conquest of Wales. A former knight, Wilkin Brattle (Lee Jones), has retired from the battlefields to return to the farmlands, where his wife is expecting their first child. But when a village revolt against the local baron’s tax-collecting brings brutal recompense, Wilkin and other villagers are set on a course of revenge. He winds up posing as the castle executioner in a barony now covertly run by the conniving Milus Corbett, played by Stephen Moyer of “True Blood.” (Minus 10 points for the hackneyed way that character’s bisexuality is meant to underscore his villainy.)

The double-episode premiere drags like it has all the time in the world, leaving a viewer time to wonder if he or she has much room left for another show with swords, beheadings and rapey pillagings. But Sutter is skilled at balancing emotion and gore, and it isn’t long before you start to believe in this place and these people. Multiple references to prophecies, dreams and magic are reminders of how “Sons of Anarchy” occasionally leaned on symbology as a way to juice more profundity out of its story, with mixed results. Similarly, “The Bastard Executioner” is better when it’s just blunt.

Crazy Ex-Girlfriend

B

Premiere date: Monday, Oct. 12

Time: 8 on CW

Though the title painfully plays into the stereotype that all women are just a breakup away from psychosis, there’s plenty else to like about this exuberant and slightly strange dramedy, in which a successful young attorney, Rebecca Bunch (Rachel Bloom), quits her junior partnership at a big New York law firm to chase after Josh Chan (Vincent Rodriguez III), the man who broke her heart 10 summers ago when they were teenagers at theater camp.

Josh now lives in West Covina, Calif., which, for Rebecca, is a sight-unseen paradise that’s “only” a two-hour drive from the ocean. The very notion of West Covina (in reality known mainly for its auto malls along I-10) sends Rebecca into a musical reverie — because this is one of those shows that easily shifts into big, hallucinatory Broadway-style numbers — about sunshine, strip clubs, Applebee’s and the biggest pretzels she’s ever seen.

No sooner has Rebecca moved there (and washed all her prescription medications down the garbage disposal in her new condo) than she lands a job at a local law firm, where a longtime paralegal, Paula (Lynne Champlin), greets Rebecca’s arrival with due suspicion. In fact, no one can figure out why Rebecca gave it all up to move to West Covina, least of all Josh — or his friend, Greg (Santino Fontana), who is instantly attracted to Rebecca despite her, well, craziness.

The pilot episode shown to critics this summer plays entirely like a pilot should — all pitch and promise, with an endearingly nutty performance from Bloom — but with little indication about the longevity of its concept. No amount of musical numbers can mask the fact that Rebecca’s pining for Josh is a dead-end story. What else does West Covina have to offer her? And is she clinically crazy? That might be worth sticking around to see.

The Last Kingdom

B

Premiere date: Saturday, Oct. 10

Time: 10 on BBC America

Here’s more proof that we’ve reached “peak TV”: We now have two epic series about viking dudes named Ragnar. BBC America’s ambitiously virile “The Last Kingdom” occupies roughly the same part of the 9th century that is so compellingly imagined in History’s “Vikings.” The stories are just far enough apart — creatively and historically — to avoid too much Venn diagram shading, but the similarities are nevertheless puzzling. Wasn’t there anything else in all of civilization’s history to make a show about?

Once viewers get over that hump, “The Last Kingdom” stands quite nicely on its own, thanks to its different perspective as a story about the birth of England under King Alfred the Great, based on Bernard Cornwell’s acclaimed historical novels.

In North Umbria of 866, Uhtred, the young son of Lord Uhtred, witnesses an invading army of Danes led by the viking Earl Ragnar defeat the English and kill his father. The vikings claim the younger Uhtred and raise him into a strapping specimen of sublimated rage and wry humor. As an adult, Uhtred (Alexander Dreymon) falls in love with Brida (Emily Cox), a young woman who grew up in his village. Animosity among the Danes leads to the betrayal and bloody defeat of Ragnar’s tribe by Uhtred’s corrupt uncle, Aelfric (Joseph Millson).

Blah, blah, blah; explain, explain, explain. The point is, once it gets going, “The Last Kingdom” is a nicely told and suitably adventurous story of revenge. Uhtred and Brida — equipped with viking fighting techniques and a certain Danish swagger — must now figure out a way for Uhtred to rightfully claim his kingdom. All this, with the usual guts, gore and grog.

Quantico

B

Premiere date: Sunday, Sept. 27

Time: 10 on ABC

Borrowing liberally from the Book of Shonda Rhimes — especially Season 1 of “How to Get Away With Murder” — and adding just a little sprinkle of Showtime’s “Homeland” on top, this ensemble thriller/drama is about a group of fresh FBI recruits reporting for elite training at the bureau’s facility in lovely Prince William County. (Don’t get too excited, NoVa watchers; the pilot was shot in Canada and Georgia.)

The plan here is for the narrative arc to jump back and forth between the recruits’ initial meeting and a devastating bombing at Grand Central Station several months later. It’s up to Alex Parrish (played by Bollywood superstar Priyanka Chopra) to help figure out which of her fellow recruits was actually a secret terrorist-in-the-making placed within the FBI. That’s why most of the pilot episode plays more like the instructions to a board game as characters introduce and establish themselves by trope: “Hi, I’m quiet, young Muslim woman, a.k.a. The Too Obvious Suspect.” And: “Hi, I’m closeted Jewish gay guy, trying way too hard to be friendly! Don’t trust me!” And: “Hi, I’m Super Stud. Let’s have sex in my car.”

Sure, it’s all sort of dumb, but “Quantico” also doesn’t mess around. Even though an early version of the pilot shown to critics had some issues (including replacing actor Dougray Scott as Alex’s mentor professor with Josh Hopkins of “Cougar Town”), Chopra brings a sincere, centrifugal force to this swirling story line. You leave the first episode wanting to know what happens next and where this conspiracy leads. That sounds like a rather basic accomplishment, but sometimes it’s all a fall drama needs to get ahead.

Code Black

B-

Premiere date: Wednesday, Sept. 30

Time: 10 on CBS

Since the “Chicago Hope” days of yore, CBS has longed to add a hospital drama to a successful prime-time schedule full of cops. “Code Black” is one of two new “ER”-style series that will premiere this season (the other being Dick Wolf’s “Chicago Med” on NBC), and it might just do the trick, if its frantic doctors can save the first episode from a deadly case of hammy dialogue.

It’s a fictionalized take on Ryan McGarry’s 2013 documentary of the same name about the emergency room at Los Angeles County General Hospital, believed to be the nation’s busiest. When a hospital reaches “Code Black,” it means that the number of critical patients has outstripped the hospital’s capacity. As the pilot episode informs viewers at the outset, most hospitals experience a Code Black five or so times a year; Angels Memorial has 300 Code Blacks a year, and you know what that means: buckets and buckets of blood.

Oscar-winner Marcia Gay Harden stars as the fearsome residency director Leanne Rorish, who clashes with her peers (especially Neal Hudson, played by Raza Jaffrey of “Homeland”) over her sometimes un­or­tho­dox techniques. If that sounds like every other hospital drama you’ve seen, then you won’t be surprised by the arrival of four naive new residents, nor will you be surprised to meet the capable-but-supremely sarcastic senior nurse (Luis Guzman), nor will you be shocked when, precisely 30 minutes in, everything goes Code Black. And we’re not messing around: At one point, Rorish is drilling into a skateboarder’s skull while Hudson is saving a leg and both are barking instructions over a speakerphone to a resident about how to deliver a baby by Cesarean section.

Flesh and Bone

B-

Premiere date: Saturday, Nov. 8

Time: 9 on Starz

Creator Moira Walley-Beckett’s eight-episode limited series about the depressing and excessively cruel world of professional ballet has moments that are sublime and engrossing but not always sustainable. “Flesh and Bone” can also be ham-handed in both narrative and dialogue, particularly when Paul Grayson (Ben Daniels), the temperamental director of Manhattan’s (fictional) American Ballet Company, barks at his dancers and staff. It’s as if he’s summoning forth every horrific backstage-monster cliché we’ve ever seen.

Even though it feels caught somewhere between “Black Swan” and “Flashdance,” “Flesh and Bone” gets off to a polished and often riveting start in its first two episodes. Walley-Beckett, whose past credits include producer roles on “Breaking Bad” and “Pan Am,” writes scenes and dialogue for competitive young women that go deeper than the usual Ryan Murphy-style cat hiss. And the show benefits greatly from a believably vulnerable lead performance from Sarah Hay as Claire, a 21-year-old aspiring dancer who flees an abusive life in Pittsburgh to go to Manhattan to audition for the ABC.

That she’s accepted in is no real spoiler, nor is her meteoric rise to being considered for the lead in the company’s season opener, to much vicious envy from her peers. Ballet and its milieu just can’t seem to catch a break when it comes to dramatic portrayal; the series is preoccupied with all forms of abuse, from dancing’s grueling physical demands to the horrible way these artists treat one another — and are treated by those who lord power over them. Saddest of all is the self-abuse. The show is relentlessly dour, but that’s not always a bad thing — and the dancing is, of course, mesmerizing. If nothing else, “Flesh and Bone” looks especially useful as the TV equivalent of boyfriend/husband repellent.

Grandfathered

B-

Premiere date: Tuesday, Sept. 29

Time: 8 on Fox

I’m never sure if we just got finished having a John Stamos moment or if we’re in the middle of another John Stamos moment. Perhaps the actor is ubiquity personified, representative of ageless male vanity. In that spirit, his new Fox sitcom, “Grandfathered,” is paired, like oaky samples in a vintage wine tasting, with Rob Lowe’s “The Grinder.”

Stamos plays Los Angeles restaurateur Jimmy Martino, whose eponymous eatery turns away diners accompanied by children and serves up a smarmy helping of its owner’s ego along with the tagliatelle. It’s only fitting, then, that this resolute bachelor would be surprised one day by the arrival of the son he never knew he had, Gerald (Josh Peck), a likable young man pushing a stroller carrying a baby girl named Edie. Thus, Jimmy is now both a father and a grandfather; his inability to say the g-word without stuttering is reminiscent of that corny “Happy Days” bit where the Fonz could never say “I’m sorry” or “I was wrong.”

Thus we are launched on Jimmy’s journey to make up for lost time and reconcile his self-image with his new reality. “I’m a 50-year-old bachelor — we’re society’s most useless people,” he confesses to Gerald, but he seems eager to embrace his expanded family, even if it means opening old heartbreaks with Gerald’s mother (Paget Brewster). Similar to “The Grinder,” in which Fred Savage plays a more interesting character than Lowe’s, Stamos is nearly upstaged by Peck (the once-chubby teen co-star of Nickelodeon’s “Drake & Josh”). It’ll take a few more zany diaper changes (you knew there had to be some) before we’ll know if there’s a stronger show here. If not, then “Grandfathered” is just a more flashy version of “Raising Hope.”

Masterpiece: Indian Summers

C+

Premiere date: Sunday, Sept. 27

Time: 9 on PBS

There’s plenty of scenic eye candy in this extravagantly made, 10-episode British drama set in India in 1932 — it couldn’t be more vividly shot if they tried. (The hue levels on my high-def TV struggled to keep the hot pinks and bright saffrons of “Indian Summers” from turning into a psychedelic acid trip.)

But viewers taking in the Raj-era luxury (contrasted against the nobly art-directed grime of slum poverty) might be discouraged by the show’s initial crawling pace. As the title indicates, it’s summer; members of the British ruling class are making their annual holiday retreat to the Himalayan foothills in Shimla, where a brash old-school maven, Cynthia Coffin (Julie Walters), runs a successful whites-only social club and schemes to advance the career of a snooty diplomat, Ralph Whelan (Henry Lloyd-Hughes), hoping to get him named as the next viceroy.

Subplots abound, including the arrival of Ralph’s mysteriously widowed sister, Alice (Jemima West), and her baby son (whose paternity is its own subplot). The most interesting character is a young Indian clerk, Aafrin (Nikesh Patel), who not only takes an assassin’s bullet meant for Ralph in Episode 1 but also comes across evidence that suggests the attempt was not the revolutionary act it was reported to be.

And that’s just what’s in the first couple of cars of this very long and slow train. It takes at least five episodes for “Indian Summers” to gain a steady momentum, which detracts from its merits, which are seen in its acting, production values and notably adult sensibilities. I can’t remember the last time a PBS “Masterpiece” drama let us overhear the exuberant sounds of two people having a quickie in the next parlor.

Minority Report

C

Premiere date: Monday, Sept. 21

Time: 9 on Fox

Fox’s “Minority Report,” a watered-down and considerably less meaningful iteration of the 2002 Steven Spielberg science-fiction movie (which itself was based on a Philip K. Dick story), is set in Washington, D.C., circa 2065. The government’s “pre-crime” initiative — in which a trio of siblings with precognitive abilities could accurately predict a violent crime before it occurred — has been dormant for a decade, after the disastrous events seen in the movie.

But one of the precogs, Dash (Stark Sands), has come out of hiding because he is still haunted by partial visions of murders, which he unsuccessfully tries to prevent. Hoping to assist an ambitious D.C. homicide detective, Lara Vega (Meagan Good), with a troubling case, Dash blows his cover; rather than out Dash to authorities, Lara begins to work with him because she’s nostalgic for the brief period when cops could jail murderers before they actually killed. “I’m tired of picking up the pieces,” Lara says. “Just once I need to stop [a murder] before it happens.”

The pilot episode yawnfully indicates a case-of-the-week procedural pace ahead, but there’s still plenty to work with here, including the mystery of Dash’s siblings, Agatha (Laura Regan) and Arthur (Nick Zano), and whether or not they’ll reunite. As a TV series, “Minority Report” retains some of the original movie’s prescient vision of the mid-21st century, with fleetingly fascinating glimpses into our highly surveilled, data-driven future. Among other things, we learn that Fox’s “The Simpsons” is in its 75th season, an Iggy Azalea album on vinyl is a revered classic and the local football team has long since changed its name to the Washington Red Clouds, after the 19th-century Lakota warrior chief. If it weren’t for all the floating commercials that follow you wherever you go, the future might look halfway bright.

Red Oaks

C

Premiere date: Friday, Oct. 9

Time: on Amazon streaming

Left to their own devices, half of Hollywood at this particular moment would greenlight nostalgia-tinted dramas and comedies based on their own coming-of-age experiences from the male, white, Jewish, suburban East Coast perspective, set sometime between 1985 and 1995. That’s just how it is. (Such coming-of-age stories used to be set in Florida in the ’50s or ’60s, with lots of doo-wop in the soundtrack. And soon enough, such projects will be set in the early 2000s with Eminem songs in the background — just wait.)

Amazon’s new half-hour dramedy “Red Oaks,” written by Gregory Jacobs and Joe Gangemi (and co-produced by Steven Soderbergh), is no better or worse than its peers in this genre; certainly it will trigger fond and awkward memories for those who lived it or something like it, but the pilot episode released earlier this year doesn’t make a case that these feelings have much thematic potential beyond the usual cliches.

NYU student David Meyers (Craig Roberts) is spending the summer of ’85 at home in the burbs, annoyed by his parents (Richard Kind, predictably; and Jennifer Grey, inspiringly) and working as the junior tennis pro at Red Oaks Country Club, around which his world revolves and evolves. His soon-to-be-ex-girlfriend is the aerobics instructor, and his stoner high school friend is a parking valet. And he’s got a thing for the rebellious daughter of the club’s owner (Paul Reiser).

In terms of verisimilitude, “Red Oaks” seems determined not to become a retro costume party and I expect it has more depth in store for its remaining episodes (which weren’t made available in time for this review). As a lived experience, I can highly recommend the actual summer of ’85; as far as a binge-watching experience, “Red Oaks” will have to get in line and wait its turn.

Scream Queens

C

Premiere date: Tuesday, Sept. 22

Time: 8 on Fox

Robust but repetitive, Fox’s “Scream Queens” is a celebratory sendup of both horror flicks and sorority culture. It’s also the latest series from Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuck (this time with co-creator/co-writer Ian Brennan), whose other hits include “Glee” and “American Horror Story.” That’s an endorsement for some and a warning label for others.

“Scream Queens” is almost prohibitively camp in tone, even for a Murphy show, scorching the campus of fictional Wallace University with any number of insults and derisive jokes aimed at every possible demographic, ethnicity, sexual orientation, disability and so on — all in the name of giddy fun and utter nonsense. Curiously, though, the humor here is not all that sharp; in its better scenes, “Scream Queens” verges on social commentary about political correctness and then turns tail once it gets a look at its own reflection in the mirror. Such pretty teeth and no real bite.

Emma Roberts (“American Horror Story”) stars as Chanel, the cruel president of the exquisitely vast (and strangely empty) Kappa House, whose “Heathers”-esque minions (each also named Chanel, including Abigail Breslin and Ariana Grande) follow her every command. A newly promoted dean, Cathy Munsch (Jamie Lee Curtis, who’s clearly having a ball), hopes to undermine the sorority by opening the pledge class to all comers, including a freshman named Grace (Skyler Samuels), who agrees to help the campus newspaper editor (Diego Boneta) dig into Kappa’s murderous past.

Soon enough, the promised serial killer (dressed as the school’s Red Devil mascot) is running up a body count; one can only imagine the guest-star potential in future victims. But there’s also a disappointing flabbiness to “Scream Queens” — a sign that Murphy and company could be running dry on ideas. After slogging through the pilot, my first urge was to get a knife and slice the series down to half-hour episodes.

Dr. Ken

C-

Premiere date: Friday, Oct. 2

Time: 8:30 on ABC

In addition to his roles in “Community” and the “Hangover” movies, comic actor Ken Jeong has actual work experience as a doctor in his background (he earned a medical degree from the University of North Carolina in 1995), which is the lone selling point of his unfortunately feeble ABC sitcom, “Dr. Ken.” The pilot episode reduces Jeong’s edgy appeal to a formulaic package in which he plays an HMO primary-care physician and family man whose temper runs medium-hot and medium-cold.

The whole show runs medium-medium, with humor plainer than Dr. Ken’s khakis. At work, Dr. Ken attempts vicious jokes about a patient’s problems; at home, he derides his son’s plan to perform a mime routine in the school talent show. Either there’s a tonal uncertainty purposefully written into Jeong’s character or, more possibly, the multi-cam sitcom format is too constrictive for the kind of humor Jeong showed in other projects. This is a man who should be given more leeway to really go there with a hemorrhoid joke.

But the dismaying default setting here is — once again — that of a doofus-dad comedy, turning Dr. Ken into another specimen with traces of Flintstone DNA. His love for his wife (Suzy Nakamura) and two children (Albert Tsai and Krista Marie Yu) sometimes causes Dr. Ken to make overbearing decisions, such as downloading an app to track his daughter’s every move. (That’s how he winds up at an EDM club yelling “I’m looking for Molly!”) Perhaps some more episodes will reveal a more assured and casually funny sitcom, but you have to wonder how “Dr. Ken” stands any more chance at success than “Cristela,” a just-as-diverse, slightly more funny and ultimately canceled predecessor in this time slot.

Blindspot

D+

Premiere date: Monday, Sept. 21

Time: 10 on NBC

Very much in keeping with what’s become a house style for thriller/espionage/conspiracy dramas at NBC (the most successful example being “The Blacklist”; the less successful being a litany of shows that includes “State of Affairs,” “Allegiance” and more), “Blindspot” is a textbook TV exercise in the preposterous.

As anyone who’s seen the zillion “Blindspot” promos knows by heart, the premise is about a mystery woman (Jaimie Alexander of the “Thor” movies) who wakes up in Times Square, nude and zipped up inside a lady-sized duffel bag with no clue of who she is or how she got there. She’s covered head to toe in fresh tattoos.

Rather than drop her off at some wayward home for amnesiac hipsters, the FBI notices one of her most prominent tattoos bears the name of their hunkiest, scruffiest field agent, Kurt Weller (Sullivan Stapleton, late of Cinemax’s far better “Strike Back”). Before long, Weller and his fellow agents (including Marianne Jean-Baptiste) realize the tattoos are some kind of giant, encrypted message made up of several clues.

In other words, she’s covered in script synopses for as many episodes as “Blindspot” can last — I predict six at least. Which means there’s a lot of running around to do (defusing bombs and such) and not a lot of time to get to know the characters in the pilot episode. The first clue sends the agents and the mystery woman (can we call her Inky-Doo?) off to Chinatown, where they learn that not only does she speak fluent Cantonese, but she’s also trained in martial arts.

“It was right there under our nose,” Weller says.

“Actually, it was behind her left ear,” another agent says.

The Player

D+

Premiere date: Thursday, Sept. 24

Time: 10 p.m. on NBC

The concept in NBC’s “The Player” is lamentably simple and might have been better off as a video game: Philip Winchester (the other co-star of Cinemax’s “Strike Back” to land a gig on NBC’s fall lineup) plays Alex Kane, a former American military operative now living in Las Vegas and working in the lucrative field of private security.

Not long after thwarting a violent attack on some big-deal clients, Alex witnesses the shooting death of his ex-wife (they were still occasional lovers) and is framed for her murder. Turns out he is being steered toward a bigger and laughably ridiculous conspiracy: He’s being recruited by an ancient, ultra-secretive, technologically advanced cabal of multibillionaires that has found a way to predict crime.

Rather than put that science to use, these unseen Illuminati like to gamble on justice, placing many-zeroed bets on whether or not a designated “player” (Alex, if he accepts the job) can prevent a crime or disaster, using only his smarts and agility to act on information provided to him by the “dealer” (Charity Wakefield) and overseen by the “house” (Wesley Snipes). Mostly this means driving cars recklessly through and around and sometimes sailing above Las Vegas.

Look, I get it: You’ve had a long day at work and all you want is a little escape. The shows on cable are too emotionally intense and intricately plotted. I’m happy to let you knock yourself out with something loud and stupid like “The Player,” which has a — oh, I see that you’ve already dozed off. Which, to me, means “The Player” does its job rather well.

Rosewood

D

Premiere date: Wednesday, Sept. 23

Time: 8 on Fox

Fox’s “Rosewood” has a plum pre-“Empire” spot on Wednesday nights, but try as it might, the pilot episode makes it seem like the kind of show you’d find on USA’s giveaway pile in the dead of summer — several summers ago. Morris Chestnut (of “Nurse Jackie” and “The Best Man” movies) stars in the title role as Beaumont Rosewood Jr., a medical examiner who has established himself as Miami’s top “private pathologist.” Because everyone needs a private pathologist, right? Rosewood is the guy you hire when a loved one has croaked but you still doubt the county coroner or Miami PD’s conclusion on the evidence.

And did I mention it’s set in Miami? It’s so totally set in Miami. It’s more Miami than HBO’s “Ballers,” which is pretty freakin’ Miami. Sunshine, convertibles, high-rise condos, parties on boats with DJs spinning the beats, and bikini-clad revelers jumping up and down to said beats — it never gets old, does it? (Sure it does.)

Here, among the lazy tropical tropes, Rosewood smoothly cavorts with cops and criminals alike, until he meets his match in a new police detective, Annalise Villa (Jaina Lee Ortiz), who doesn’t buy his suave shtick. When Rosewood’s mother (“Orange Is the New Black’s” Lorraine Toussaint) asks him to look into the suspicious car-crash death of her beloved student, he insinuates himself into Villa’s casework.

Possessing CBS-style powers of investigatory super-sleuthing, Rosewood turns out to be a man of little if any self-awareness, even when he’s trying to have an honest moment. There’s hardly a crack in his veneer or any ironic punch line to his act — we’re just meant to accept him as the coolest man in Miami. As such, he’s just another dull, pretty detective who solves his cases too quickly.

Blood & Oil

F

Premiere date: Sunday, Sept. 27

Time: 9 on ABC

With oil prices now below $50 a barrel, I think it’s safe to say that TV has missed its chance to come up with a relevant, compelling drama about the Bakken shale boom and the fascinating rush mentality it brought to small cities and towns in North Dakota and eastern Montana.

And even if it had come out a few seasons ago, ABC’s dreadfully conceived and horribly acted “Blood & Oil” pilot would still seem like a miserable misfire. Chace Crawford (“Gossip Girl”) and Rebecca Rittenhouse star as Billy and Kelly LeFever, two Southerners who set out for North Dakota with the can’t-miss idea of opening a laundromat in a small town packed to the gills with freshly arrived wildcatters who are all living in cars, RVs and plywood shanties and need somewhere to wash their clothes.

That plan quickly goes awry when the LeFevers’ pick’em’up truck flips over on a highway embankment and destroys all their brand new (and uninsured, it turns out) coin-op washing machines and dryers. Now whut? The LeFevers can barely afford to rent in shantytown, so Billy sets about on a scheme that lands him smack dab in a high-stakes mineral rights deal, going up against the richest man in town, Hap Briggs (Don Johnson, who should have known better than to say yes to this offer).

Even allowing for the loose standards of the prime-time soap genre, there’s little good to say about “Blood & Oil.” Its scene-setting and cultural details are hilariously inaccurate, which wouldn’t matter so much if its story or characters were halfway interesting. All that’s left to do is reach for the right oil industry-related metaphor with which to dismiss it: A dry well? An empty barrel? How about we just call it crude?

Chicago Med

Pending

Premiere date: Tuesday, Nov. 17

Time: 9 on NBC

NBC hasn’t shared an episode of “Chicago Med” with critics (the premiere date is a ways off yet), but “Chicago Fire” viewers already got a glimpse last season at what to expect. “Chicago Med” rounds out creator Dick Wolf’s Windy City municipal-drama empire, joining “Fire” and “Chicago PD” in chronicling Chi-town’s make-believe emergencies. (I say “rounds out,” but that never means “finishes” where Wolf is concerned. There’s room yet on the schedule for “Chicago Veterinary.” Or maybe something having to do with sanitation workers . . .)

Anyhow, not to be confused with the great hospital classic “ER” (also set in a Chicago hospital), “Chicago Med” is a hospital show, set in a state-of-the-art trauma center. A very large cast includes Oliver Platt (“The Big C”) as the head of psychiatry and S. Epatha Merkerson of “Law & Order” as the big boss.

Heroes Reborn

C+

Premiere date: Thursday, Sept. 24

Time: 8 on NBC

It’s possible that networks of the future will function more like specialty boutiques, reaching smaller but fiercely dedicated and demanding viewers who find that their favorite TV shows ended before their appetite for the material was fully sated. In that spirit, creator Tim Kring’s “Heroes Reborn,” a 13-episode “event series” on NBC, may or may not satisfy fans of the original series (which ended in 2010). Judged on its own, ”Heroes Reborn” doesn’t make an airtight case for its revival.

Nevertheless, the first three episodes (including the two-hour Sept. 24 premiere) demonstrate that “Heroes” is/was an often stylish way to tell tales of the super-abled. It’s been a year since a massive bomb detonation in Odessa, Tex., destroyed a gathering to promote goodwill between everyday humans and “evos” (the nickname for people with superpowers). A nation on high-alert now blames and actively hunts down evos, who have all gone into hiding — including a teenage boy (Robbie Kay) with teleportation powers

Noah Bennett (Jack Coleman), who survived the bombing, discovers that his memory has been erased, but he pieces together enough to realize that a corporation plans to use the mental powers of a young woman, Molly Walker (Francesca Eastwood), to be able to locate remaining evos and wipe them out. Zachary Levi (“Chuck”) and Judi Shekioni play married assassins assigned to do the dirty work.

And that really only scratches the surface of “Heroes Reborn’s” multi-track plots and subplots. Since my own memory has been wiped of the original “Heroes” (it predates my tenure as TV critic), I was more surprised when two of the characters suddenly jumped inside a martial-arts video game. I’ve heard that people who no longer watch traditional TV do love to go online and watch other gamers. Perhaps the singularity is nearer than we think.

The Muppets

B

Premiere date: Tuesday, Sept. 22

Time: 8 on ABC

Working from Jim Henson’s legacy, co-creators Bill Prady and Bob Kushell deliver a smart and often witty update to the Muppet brand with ABC’s “The Muppets.” The trick? It’s a mockumentary — and yes, that’s probably a hackneyed format (as Gonzo immediately points out in protest), but it nevertheless suits what the Muppets are after here, which is to please both young and older audiences. For the grownups, there are slightly edgy jokes about sex and AA meetings, but they’re subtle enough to invite family viewing, depending on the family.

The new show is faintly reminiscent of “The Muppet Show” of the 1970s, in that it’s a backstage look at a comedy show very much in progress, this time called “Up Late With Miss Piggy,” with the only female host in late-night. Difficulties abound, starting with the fact that executive producer Kermit and the show’s star, Miss Piggy, have broken up after years of romantic involvement. (This will only be news to you if you’ve been living under a rock.)

The Muppets have had up-and-down luck with reboots. As you may have expected, this one is somewhat leaden with too many celebrity cameos (Elizabeth Banks, Josh Groban, Tom Bergeron, Jay Leno and author Reza Aslan in just the first two episodes), even considering that celebrity cameos have always been a Muppets stand-by. This show seems to work best when it leans on lots of L.A.-centric verisimilitude, from traffic jams on the 405 to requests for selfies while out in public. When Bobo the Bear is trying to get the office to buy his daughter’s Girl Scout cookies, someone suggest he try Animal, et al, in the Electric Mayhem band. “Those guys are always happy,” one of the Muppets observes. “Legally, now,” another answers.

Truth Be Told

D

Premiere date: Friday, Oct. 16

Time: 8:30 on NBC

After a title change (it used to be called “People Are Talking”) and a cast change (Vanessa Lachey stepped into the role Meaghan Rath played in the original pilot shown to critics), NBC’s sitcom “Truth Be Told” is still pretty weak.

Once again drawing on his personal experiences and bragging about the diversity of his writer’s room, creator DJ Nash (“Growing Up Fisher”) describes his sitcom as a fresh take on the conversations and observations we all have (or want to have) about race, culture and everyday interactions. In “Truth Be Told,” Mark-Paul Gosselaar plays Mitch, a college ethics professor whose attorney wife, Tracy (Lachey) is mixed-race; the couple is best friends with the couple next door, a comedian named Russell (Tone Bell) and his pragmatic business-lady wife, Angie (Bresha Webb), who are black.

Aside from checking off some appropriate boxes, the aim of “Truth Be Told” is to apply some “Seinfeld”-like scrutiny to otherwise innocuous situations (Is the hostess at the Chinese restaurant faking her accent? Why did the valet assume the Porsche is Mitch’s and not Russell’s?), only this time told from the perspective of a foursome that is not 100 percent white. Setting aside the producers’ aspirationally post-racial pitch, “Truth Be Told” looks and moves very much like another ho-hum sitcom; there are a few laughs here and there, performed by a likable assemblage of actors — but the same could be said about almost any sitcom in any season. Even if you factor in some skin tone and conversational pitfalls, nothing here seems all that groundbreaking.

Wicked City

F

Premiere date: Tuesday, Oct. 27

Time: 10 on ABC

“Wicked City’s” creators have presumptuously imagined this abysmal crime drama as an anthology series, intending to look back at several grisly eras of Los Angeles’s crime history with each season. First up is the late summer of 1982, in which Ed Westwick (“Gossip Girl”) plays Kent Grainger, a (fictional) serial killer prowling the Sunset Strip nightclubs for female victims. Once he finds one, Kent’s sick trademark is to dedicate a song to her on a local rock station. Jeremy Sisto (“Six Feet Under”; “Suburgatory”) looks miserable as the old-fashioned homicide detective trying to catch him; and “Parenthood’s” Erika Christensen plays a would-be victim who turns, implausibly, into Kent’s accomplice.

From the full review, posted Oct. 26: “ ‘Wicked City’ is violent in a dumb, done-before, tediously psychosexual way. … If campiness was meant to underscore all of this (a la Ryan Murphy, perhaps?), it fails to convey.”

[Read full review]

What else is on

Worth a look

There’s plenty else premiering on your screen this fall: more comedies and dramas (interplanetary crime fighters, new versions of Scooby-Doo and Bugs Bunny, an Aziz Ansari series), plus the usual raft of reality shows, documentaries, movies, concerts and specials.

In this chronological list, I’ve noted some programs that aroused my interest or at least passed my initial sniff test. Maybe they’ll do something for you, too.

“Hand of God”

on Amazon Streaming

Gritty and initially overwrought 10-episode drama stars Ron Perlman (“Sons of Anarchy”) as Judge Pernell Harris, a corrupt local magistrate who gets religion and starts having hallucinations that convince him that he can avenge the rape of his daughter-in-law and miraculously wake his comatose son. Dana Delany plays Pernell’s skeptical wife; Andre Royo (“The Wire”) plays a conniving mayor. If nothing else, “Hand of God” is well versed in the basic techniques of TV’s dark-hearted dramas, starting with the fact that everyone in it has a deeply damaged soul.

“Project Greenlight”

SundaySept. 13

10 on HBO

Ben Affleck and Matt Damon exhume their idealistic HBO reality series a decade later and give it a few tweaks: In this iteration, a Facebook contest helps find an amateur filmmaker (revealed in the first episode), who is now tasked with directing a rough comedy script by the Farrelly brothers (“Dumb and Dumber”). What hasn’t changed is the argumentative, but certainly watchable, process of compromise that brings a finished movie to the screen — or in this case, to an airdate on HBO. “Project Greenlight” is still a painfully exquisite chronicling of First World problems.

“Best Time Ever With Neil Patrick Harris”

TuesdaySept. 15

10 on NBC

It’s a comedy show, it’s a game show, it’s a variety show, it’s a stunt show — based on a similar hit from England. Neil Patrick Harris hosts.

“Moonbeam City”

WednesdaySept. 16

10:30 on Comedy Central

With a slick, air-brushed, 1980s fashion style seemingly swiped from the works of painter Patrick Nagel, this animated series spoofs cop shows such as “Miami Vice.” (Think of “Archer” on the cover of a Duran Duran album.) Voices include Elizabeth Banks, Will Forte, Rob Lowe and Kate Mara.

“Dash Dolls”

SundaySept. 20

9 on E!

Reality series about the lucky people who are employed at the Kardashian-owned boutique called Dash.

“Alaska Haunting”

SundaySept. 20

10 on Destination America

It was only a matter of time before TV figured out a way to meld these two reality genres: ghost shows and Alaska wilderness shows . . .

“Gorongosa Park: Rebirth of Paradise”

TuesdaySept. 22

on PBS, check local listings

Three-part nature/docuseries about the effort to restore and repopulate a wildlife park in Mozambique after a civil war.

“On Two Fronts: Latinos and Vietnam”

TuesdaySept. 22

on PBS, check local listings

Documentary examines the Latino experience of the American war in Vietnam, through the perspective of two siblings — one who fought in the war and the other who protested it.

“Road Spill”

WednesdaySept. 23

10:30 on TruTV

Reality show about what people really yammer on about in the privacy of their own cars.

“Fashionably Late With Rachel Zoe”

ThursdaySept. 24

10:30 on Lifetime

A weekly talk show hosted by the (surprisingly resilient) Hollywood style maven.

“American Masters: The Women’s List”

FridaySept. 25

on PBS, check local listings

Another in the “List” series from Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, focusing on the achievements, struggles and life lessons of Madeleine Albright, Gloria Allred, Laurie Anderson, Edie Falco, Alicia Keys, Shonda Rhimes and more.

“Margaret Cho: psyCHO”

FridaySept. 25

9 on Showtime

Stand-up comedy special from a woman who’s had more than her share of them.

“Step It Up”

FridaySept. 25

10 on Lifetime

Reality series follows Traci Young-Byron, a former Miami Heat dancer who now helms the Young Contemporary Dance Theatre.

“Brian Regan: Live”

SaturdaySept. 26

9 on Comedy Central

Another stand-up comedy special, but apparently the first one to air live on this network.

“American Dream/American Knightmare”

SaturdaySept. 26

9 on Showtime

Documentary about the eventful life of Death Row Records co-founder Suge Knight.

“Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy”

SaturdaySept. 26

9:30 on Disney XD

New animated series based on last summer’s cheeky hit movie, which is based on a Marvel comic book. You can watch it as soon as you take out the trash like I asked you to an hour ago.

“CSI: Crime Scene Investigation”

SundaySept. 27

8 on CBS

A special movie to wrap things up on the crime procedural that started it all — and caused real-life juries to believe that obtaining DNA results is as easy as a trip to the ATM.

“Vice Special Report: Fixing the System”

SundaySept. 27

9 on HBO

The “Vice” squad takes a closer look at America’s criminal justice system — which includes tagging along with President Obama this summer on a visit a correctional facility in Oklahoma.

“San Francisco 2.0”

MondaySept. 28

9 on HBO

Busy documentarian Alexandra Pelosi turns the lens on her rapidly changing home town as the tech boom drives out more and more working-class residents and starving artists. Lots of questions and very few answers — it’s the filmmaking equivalent of standing arms akimbo and looking concerned.

“I’ll Have What Phil’s Having”

MondaySept. 28

on PBS, check local listings

Travelogue/food show with Phil Rosenthal, creator of TV’s “Everybody Loves Raymond.”

“The Daily Show With Trevor Noah”

MondaySept. 28

11 on Comedy Central

Jon Stewart fans, keep your expectations low and your mind open as the still mostly unknown comedian takes over the host’s chair.

“iHeart Radio Music Festival”

TuesdaySept. 29

8 on CW

Two-night, four-hour concert special. It’s radio on your television, kids.

“Adam Ruins Everything”

TuesdaySept. 29

10 on TruTV

Expanding his online CollegeHumor series, comedian Adam Conover explores some of our misconceptions about fun things we take for granted.

“E.O. Wilson: Of Ants and Men”

WednesdaySept. 30

on PBS, check local listings

Documentary explores the life and work of the renowned insect expert and Pulitzer-winning father of sociobiology.

“The Fluffy Movie”

WednesdaySept. 30

8:30 on Fuse

Backstage footage from the sold-out world tour by comedian Gabriel Iglesias (a.k.a. “Fluffy”).

“Transcendent”

WednesdaySept. 30

11:30 on Fuse

Docuseries from producer of “RuPaul’s Drag Race” follows the lives of performers at the AsiaSF Cabaret in San Francisco. ,

“Live Nation Music Awards”

ThursdayOct. 1

on TNT/TBS, time to be announced

Because what we really needed was another music awards show.

“Benders”

ThursdayOct. 1

10 on IFC

Denis Leary produces this new comedy series about best friends who play together on an amateur hockey team.

“Fluffy Breaks Even”

ThursdayOct. 1

10 on Fuse

Docuseries follows Gabriel Iglesias and his comedian friends on tour; not to be confused, one supposes, with “The Fluffy Movie” backstage documentary that aired the night before.

“Gigi Does It”

ThursdayOct. 1

10:30 on IFC

David Krumholtz (“Numb3rs”) stars as an outspoken older Jewish lady who sets out to spend the fortune her dead husband left behind.

“POV: Ai Weiwei — The Fake Case”

FridayOct. 2

on PBS, check local listings

Documentary about how China’s attempt to silence the artist Ai Weiwei backfired, turning him into an international sensation.

“Anjelah Johnson: Not Fancy”

FridayOct. 2

on Netflix streaming

Stand-up comedy special.

“The Jacksons: Next Generation”

FridayOct. 2

10 on Lifetime

Reality series about life as a second-generation Jackson — in this case, Tito’s three sons: T.J., Taj and Taryll, who are in their late 30s and early 40s.

“Skee TV”

FridayOct. 2

10 on Fuse

Talk show hosted by DJ Skee.

“The Unauthorized Beverly Hills 90210 Story”

SaturdayOct. 3

8 on Lifetime

Clearly, we’ve only scratched the surface of old TV shows waiting to be turned into dreadful Lifetime tell-all movies.

“The Widower”

SundayOct. 4

on PBS, check local listings

Three-part drama based on the true story of Malcolm Webster, a British nurse who was convicted of murdering his first wife and trying to murder his second wife to cash in their life-insurance policies.

“50/50”

SundayOct. 4

7 on Travel

Reality/travel show offers people a 50-hour, $50,000 trip somewhere — the only hitch is they have to leave right now.

“Art Breakers”

SundayOct. 4

8 on Ovation

Four-part docuseries about two art advisers who seek to match groundbreaking works of art with the clients who can afford them. ,

“The Weapon Hunter”

MondayOct. 5

8 on Smithsonian Channel

History buff and gun restorer Paul Shull goes on a quest to find, fix and shoot some prized firearms.

“Wabbit”

MondayOct. 5

8 on Boomerang

New animated shorts, in a new style, featuring a new kind of Bugs Bunny.

“Be Cool, Scooby-Doo!”

MondayOct. 5

8:30 on Boomerang

Update of the popular cartoon franchise — the 12th “Scooby-Doo” series since the canine sleuth’s 1969 debut. This time, the gang is graduating from high school and has one summer left to party, but ghosts and monsters get in the way. (Wait — the gang was in high school all this time? Guess they ditched a lot of classes.)

“Casual”

WednesdayOct. 7

on Hulu streaming

This cynical but engaging 10-episode dramedy from writer Zander Lehmann and executive producer Jason Reitman stars Michaela Watkins as Valerie, a recently divorced therapist who moves, with her teenage daughter (Tara Lynne Barr), into the home of her snarky brother, Alex (Tommy Dewey). He’s the inventor of a successful online dating site that matches people looking for casual encounters. The show’s vibe is smack in between “Transparent” and “Married.”

“SuperMansion

ThursdayOct. 8

on Crackle streaming

From the creators of “Robot Chicken,” a stop-motion animation comedy featuring the voice of Bryan Cranston as Titanium Rex, a veteran superhero who is faced with leading a team of past-their-prime superheroes.

“The New Mr. Peabody & Sherman Show”

FridayOct. 9

on Netflix streaming

Return of the kids’ series about a genius dog and his boy.

“Winter on Fire: Ukraine’s Fight for Freedom”

FridayOct. 9

on Netflix streaming

Documentary by Evgeny Afineevsky chronicles student demonstrations in 2013-14 that morphed into a violent revolution.

“Prophet’s Prey”

SaturdayOct. 10

9 on Showtime

Cable premiere of a highly praised documentary about Warren Jeffs and his polygamous cult.

“The Unauthorized Melrose Place Story”

SaturdayOct. 10

8 on Lifetime

Another movie about the bitchiness, backstabbing and existential ennui that plagued the set of a popular 1990s TV show. (Make it stop!)

“BET Hip Hop Awards”

TuesdayOct. 13

8 on BET

Honors the best of the past year’s hip-hop performances, production and videos.

“The Brain With David Eagleman”

WednesdayOct. 14

on PBS, check local listings

Six-hour science series looks deeply at the noodle inside the noggin.

“Anthony Jeselnik: Thoughts and Prayers”

FridayOct. 16

on Netflix streaming

Stand-up comedy special.

“Amy Schumer: Live From the Apollo Theater”

SaturdayOct. 17

10 on HBO

There’s no stopping her — and who’s trying?

“Belief”

SundayOct. 18

8 on OWN

A lavishly produced seven-night documentary from Oprah Winfrey about the ways people search for deeper meaning and personal connections from the perspective of a wide range of religious and spiritual beliefs. (Sounds very O.)

“Lost in Paradise”

SundayOct. 18

9 on Hallmark

Movie based on the best-selling books by Robert B. Parker, with Tom Selleck reprising his role as Police Chief Jesse Stone, who is asked to help solve a series of murders in Boston.

“Robot Chicken DC Comics Special III: Magical Friendship”

SundayOct. 18

on Adult Swim

The Batman-Superman bromance hits a crisis point that has a disastrous effect on the DC multiverse.

“The Westbrooks” (working title)

TuesdayOct. 20

10 on BET

Reality series about five sisters who are quite skilled at advancing their personal brands on social media.

“Do Not Disturb: Hotel Horrors”

WednesdayOct. 21

9 on Investigation Discovery

Docuseries explores gruesome stories of very unfortunate hotel guests.

“RocketJump: The Show”

WednesdayOct. 21

on Hulu streaming

Weekly series takes viewers behind the scenes of Freddie Wong’s viral RocketJump video shorts.

“Compared to What: The Improbable Journey of Barney Frank”

FridayOct. 23

9 on Showtime

Documentary looks at the public and private life of the outspoken and sometimes controversial retired congressman from Massachusetts.

“Revealed”

SaturdayOct. 24

7 on Fuse

Music/biography series examines the lives and careers of today’s current stars — Jason Derulo, Trey Songz, Ed Sheeran, Ciara, etc.

“How to Dance in Ohio”

MondayOct. 26

9 on HBO

Documentary follows a 12-week course that prepares autistic teens and young adults for spring formal dance.

“Exorcism Live!”

FridayOct. 30

9 on Destination America

The crew from “Ghost Asylum” travels to a suburban St. Louis home that was reportedly the site of a 1949 exorcism. Here, on live TV, they will . . . do what, exactly?

“Ash vs. Evil Dead”

SaturdayOct. 31

9 on Starz

A 10-episode bloodfest from Sam Raimi, based on his popular “Evil Dead” cult horror films. Starring, of course, the inimitable Bruce Campbell as Ash Williams, the chain-saw-armed antihero of the previous films.

“Barbara Walters Presents American Scandals”

MondayNov. 2

10 on Investigation Discovery

Docuseries in which the retired 85-year-old newswoman recounts big, dishy scandal stories that she covered, which now gather dust in her ABC News archives.

“The Diplomat”

MondayNov. 2

9 on HBO

Documentary about the life and work of the late Richard Holbrooke, directed by his son David.

“Master of None”

FridayNov. 6

on Netflix streaming

This new sorta “Louie”-esque comedy series stars Aziz Ansari as Dev, a 30-year-old actor who lives in New York (of course) and is unable to decide what he wants from life. Judging from a preview trailer shown to critics this summer, “Master of None” looks like a hilarious wallow in that awkwardness we all love so much.

Untitled U2 documentary

SaturdayNov. 7

on HBO, time to be announced

Behind the scenes during the band’s recent Innocence + Experience Tour — and a prelude to the network’s U2 concert special on Nov. 14.

“Agent X”

SundayNov. 8

9 on TNT

Action/drama series about John Case (Jeff Hephner), a.k.a. Agent X, whose missions are so secret that the president doesn’t even know about them. Instead, Agent X takes his orders from the vice president (Sharon Stone).

“Independent Lens: Stray Dog”

MondayNov. 9

on PBS, check local listings

Documentary from director Debra Granik (“Winter’s Bone”) follows Ron Hall, a.k.a. “Stray Dog,” who makes a motorcycle trip from Missouri to the District to honor deceased Vietnam veterans; meanwhile, back home, he’s making a new life with his Mexican wife and her sons as they try to find their place in a rapidly changing America.

“American Epic”

TuesdayNov. 10

on PBS, check local listings

Two-part film retraces the 1920 journey of talent scouts who traveled the country with the first electric recording machine in an attempt to unearth emerging forms of American music. Concludes Nov. 17.

“Debt of Honor: Disabled Veterans in American History”

TuesdayNov. 10

on PBS, check local listings

Ric Burns’s documentary examines the cultural and federal regard for men and women injured and disabled while fighting our wars — and how it’s changed over time.

“Soul Train Awards”

TuesdayNov. 10

8 on BET

Honors the best in R&B performances, songs and videos.

“Secret Space Escapes”

TuesdayNov. 10

10 on Science Channel

Docuseries recounts true tales from astronauts about close calls, dangerous moments and other near-collisions that occurred on their missions and that few outsiders ever knew about.

“Donny!”

TuesdayNov. 10

10:30 on USA

“Soft-scripted” comedy/reality series loosely based on the life of cable-TV host Donny Deutsch, who plays a daytime talk host.

“John Mulaney: The Comeback Kid”

FridayNov. 13

on Netflix streaming

Stand-up comedy special.

U2 concert (Innocence + Experience tour)

SaturdayNov. 14

on HBO, time to be announced

Scheduled to be filmed at the Bercy Arena in Paris.

“Spotless”

SaturdayNov. 14

10 on Esquire

Esquire’s first foray into scripted content, this dark comedy is about a man with a successful crime-scene cleaning business whose life is disrupted by the arrival of his troublesome brother. Brendan Coyle (“Downton Abbey”) plays a mob boss.

“Into the Badlands”

SundayNov. 15

10 on AMC

Futuristic/dystopian/feudal martial arts drama series set in the American Midwest centuries from now. Stars Daniel Wu as the best of a highly trained group of assassins known as the Clippers.

“Independent Lens: India’s Daughter”

MondayNov. 16

on PBS, check local listings

Documentary about the short life of Jyoti Singh, the victim of a gang rape and murder in 2012 that sparked a profound cultural shift in discussing violence against women in India.

“The American Epic Sessions”

TuesdayNov. 17

on PBS, check local listings

This companion piece to “American Epic” (see Nov. 10) meticulously reassembles the first electronic recording machine that allowed America to hear its various musical styles.

“The Art of More”

ThursdayNov. 19

on Crackle streaming

Drama series about an ambitious Iraq war veteran (Christian Cooke) who leverages his newfound knowledge of antiquities smuggling into a position at a premium auction house, where the stakes are high — and dangerous. Dennis Quaid and Kate Bosworth also star.

“Marvel’s Jessica Jones”

FridayNov. 20

on Netflix streaming

Marvel’s who? If you have to ask, you’re not a comics fan. Krysten Ritter stars in the title role as a former superhero who opens her own detective agency.

“Royal Family Thanksgiving”

SaturdayNov. 21

8 on TV One

Movie about a couple (Richard Lawson and Debbi Morgan) who fake a marital struggle to lure their extremely busy adult children home for Thanksgiving.

“Jim Henson’s Turkey Hollow”

SaturdayNov. 21

8 on Lifetime

Live-action movie based on a never-produced 1968 idea from the man who gave us the Muppets. Stars Mary Steenburgen, Ludacris and Jay Harrington.

“Eddie Murphy: The Kennedy Center Mark Twain Prize”

MondayNov. 23

9 on PBS

Star-studded salute to the comedian and actor, taped in Washington on Oct. 18.

“31/2 Minutes, Ten Bullets”

MondayNov. 23

9 on HBO

Documentary film examines the 2012 case of a white man, Michael Dunn, who shot at a car full of black teenagers at a Jacksonville, Fla., gas station (killing one of them) because he says he felt threatened by their loud rap music.

“Independent Lens: Mimi and Dona”

MondayNov. 23

on PBS, check local listings

Documentary follows a 92-year-old woman, Mimi, as she looks for a new home for her intellectually disabled 64-year-old daughter, Dona.

“American Experience: The Pilgrims”

TuesdayNov. 24

on PBS, check local listings

Documentary from Ric Burns explores the events that led a group of English men and women to cross the Atlantic in 1620, and the struggles they endured to build a community in New England.

“It’s Your 50th Christmas, Charlie Brown”

MondayNov. 30

9 on ABC

Special hosted by Kristen Bell (and designed to make some of us feel older than Pig Pen’s dirt) salutes the iconic 1965 Christmas program.

“Racing Extinction”

WednesdayDec. 2

9 on Discovery

Documentary from director Louie Psihoyos (“The Cove”) sends a team of artists and activists on an undercover operation to expose the world of endangered-species trafficking.

“The Wiz Live!”

ThursdayDec. 3

8 on NBC

The latest in the network’s annual live musical extravaganzas, this time adapting the 1974 hit stage musical — a soulful retelling of “The Wizard of Oz” with an all-black cast. Unlike “The Sound of Music” and “Peter Pan,” “The Wiz” is more open to interpretation and always ripe for a creative revamp. Lots of stars have signed up, including Mary J. Blige as Evillene, the Wicked Witch; David Alan Grier as the Cowardly Lion; Uzo Aduba as Glinda; and Queen Latifah as the Wiz. Shanice Williams will play Dorothy.

“Royal Family Christmas”

SaturdayDec. 5

8 on TV One

Movie. Remember “Royal Family Thanksgiving?” It was only two weeks ago. Here’s the sequel as the Royal kids scheme to get their parents back together.

“Very Semi-Serious: A Partially Thorough Portrait of New Yorker Cartoonists”

MondayDec. 7

9 on HBO

Documentary about the process behind creating and choosing the cartoons that run in the New Yorker magazine.

“Dolly Parton’s Coat of Many Colors”

ThursdayDec. 10

9 on NBC

Heartwarming family movie — the first of several planned movies that will be based on lyrics from Dolly Parton’s songbook. This one recounts the “Coat of Many Colors,” based loosely on an event from Parton’s childhood.

“Bolshoi Babylon”

MondayDec. 14

9 on HBO

Documentary gets a rare, behind-the-scenes look at the legendary Moscow ballet company, in the wake of a 2013 acid-throwing attack on its creative director.

“Childhood’s End”

MondayDec. 14

8 on Syfy

Three-night miniseries adaptation of Arthur C. Clarke’s classic novel about the empty utopian promises offered by an alien race (the Overlords) and a handful of earthlings who aren’t buying it.

“The Expanse”

MondayDec. 14

10 on Syfy

Two-night premiere (Dec. 14 and 15) of a new series starring Thomas Jane (“Hung”) as a detective who chases down leads on a murder case across the solar system. Based on a series of novels.

“Mike Epps: After Dark”

FridayDec. 18

on Netflix streaming

Stand-up comedy special.

“The 38th Annual Kennedy Center Honors”

TuesdayDec. 29

9 on CBS

Telecast of the ceremony taped earlier in the month, bestowing the Honors on the Eagles, Carole King, George Lucas, Rita Moreno, Seiji Ozawa and Cicely Tyson.

“Chelsea Does”

on Netflix streaming

Four-part docuseries starring the comedian, author and former late-night talk host, in which she tackles some of the biggies: Chelsea does marriage, Chelsea does racism, Chelsea does Silicon Valley, and Chelsea does drugs.

“A Very Murray Christmas”

on Netflix streaming

Eagerly anticipated star-studded Bill Murray holiday special, directed by Sofia Coppola.

“F Is for Family”

on Netflix streaming

Animated series starring the voice of comedian Bill Burr as the loudmouthed patriarch of a family in the 1970s.

“Long Live the Royals”

on Cartoon Network

Animated special about a royal family at Christmastime.

Returning this season

Still worth a look

“20/20”

FridaySept. 11

10 on ABC

“48 Hours”

SaturdaySept. 26

10 on CBS

“60 Minutes”

SundaySept. 27

7 on CBS

“The Affair”

SundayOct. 4

10 on Showtime

“The Amazing Race”

FridaySept. 25

8 on CBS

“America’s Funniest Home Videos”

SundayOct. 11

7 on ABC

“American Horror Story: Hotel”

WednesdayOct. 7

10 on FX

“Arrow”

WednesdayOct. 7

8 on CW

“The Awesomes”

began streaming on Sept. 8

on Hulu streaming

“The Big Bang Theory”

MondaySept. 21

8 on CBS

“Being Mary Jane”

TuesdayOct. 20

9 on BET

“Beyond the Tank”

TuesdaySept. 29

10 on ABC

“Black Jesus”

FridaySept. 18

11 on Adult Swim

“Black-ish”

WednesdaySept. 23

9:30 on ABC

“The Blacklist”

ThursdayOct. 1

9 on NBC

“Blue Bloods”

FridaySept. 25

10 on CBS

“Bob’s Burgers”

SundaySept. 27

7:30 on Fox

“Bones”

ThursdayOct. 1

8 on Fox

“Brooklyn Nine Nine”

SundaySept. 27

8:30 on Fox

“Castle”

MondaySept. 21

10 on ABC

“Chicago Fire”

TuesdayOct. 13

10 on NBC

“Chicago PD”

WednesdaySept. 30

10 on NBC

“Criminal Minds”

WednesdaySept. 30

9 on CBS

“CSI: Cyber”

SundayOct. 4

10 on CBS

“Dancing With the Stars”

MondaySept. 14

8 on ABC

“Doc Martin”

MondayOct. 5

on Acorn TV streaming

“Doctor Who”

SaturdaySept. 19

9 on BBC America

“Doll & Em”

SundaySept. 13

11 on HBO

“Downton Abbey”

SundayJan. 3

9 on PBS

“Elementary”

ThursdayNov. 5

10 on CBS

“Empire”

WednesdaySept. 23

9 on Fox

“Family Guy”

SundaySept. 27

9 on Fox

“Finding Carter”

TuesdayOct. 6

10 on MTV

“Fargo”

MondayOct. 12

10 on FX

“The Flash”

TuesdayOct. 6

8 on CW

“Fresh Off the Boat”

TuesdaySept. 22

8:30 on ABC

“The Goldbergs”

WednesdaySept. 23

8:30 on ABC

“The Good Wife”

SundayOct. 4

9 on CBS

“Gotham”

MondaySept. 21

8 on Fox

“Grey’s Anatomy”

ThursdaySept. 24

8 on ABC

“Grimm”

FridayOct. 30

10 on NBC

“Hawaii Five-O”

FridaySept. 25

9 on CBS

“Hemlock Grove”

FridayOct. 23

on Netflix streaming

“Homeland”

SundayOct. 4

9 on Showtime

“How to Get Away With Murder”

ThursdaySept. 24

10 on ABC

“iZombie”

TuesdayOct. 6

9 on CW

“Jane the Virgin”

MondayOct. 12

9 on CW

“The Knick”

FridayOct. 16

10 on Cinemax

“The Last Man on Earth”

SundaySept. 27

9:30 on Fox

“Last Man Standing”

FridaySept. 25

8 on ABC

“Law & Order: SVU”

WednesdaySept. 23

9 on NBC

“The League”

WednesdaySept. 9

10 on FXX

“The Leftovers”

SundayOct. 4

9 on HBO

“Legends”

MondayNov. 2

10 on TNT

“The Librarians”

SundayNov. 1

8 on TNT

“Longmire”

began streaming Sept. 10

on Netflix streaming

“Madam Secretary”

SundayOct. 4

8 on CBS

“Major Crimes”

MondayNov. 2

9 on TNT

“Manhattan”

TuesdayOct. 13

9 on WGN America

“Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.”

TuesdaySept. 29

8 on ABC

“MasterChef Junior”

FridayNov. 6

8 on Fox

“The Middle”

WednesdaySept. 23

8 on ABC

“The Mindy Project”

began streaming Sept. 15

on Hulu streaming

“Modern Family”

WednesdaySept. 23

9 on ABC

“Mom”

ThursdayNov. 5

9 on CBS

“The Mysteries of Laura”

WednesdaySept. 23

8 on NBC

“Nashville”

WednesdaySept. 23

10 on ABC

“Nathan for You”

ThursdayOct. 15

10 on Comedy Central

NCIS

TuesdaySept. 22

8 on CBS

“NCIS: Los Angeles”

MondaySept. 21

10 on CBS

“NCIS: New Orleans”

TuesdaySept. 22

9 on CBS

“Once Upon a Time”

SundaySept. 27

8 on ABC

“The Originals”

ThursdayOct. 8

9 on CW

“Please Like Me”

FridayOct. 16

10 on Pivot

“Reign”

FridayOct. 9

8 on CW

“Ridiculousness”

ThursdayOct. 8

10 on MTV

“Robot Chicken”

SundayOct. 25

midnight on Adult Swim

“Satisfaction”

FridayOct. 16

10 on USA

“Saturday Night Live”

SaturdayOct. 3

11:30 on NBC

“Scandal”

ThursdaySept. 24

9 on ABC

“Scorpion”

MondaySept. 21

9 on CBS

“Shark Tank”

FridaySept. 25

9 on ABC

“The Simpsons”

SundaySept. 27

8 on Fox

“Sleepy Hollow”

ThursdayOct. 1

9 on Fox

“Star Wars Rebels”

WednesdayOct. 14

9:30 on Disney XD

“Supernatural”

WednesdayOct. 7

9 on CW

“Survivor”

WednesdaySept. 23

8 on CBS

“Transparent”

Friday, Dec. 4

on Amazon streaming

“Undateable”

FridayOct. 9

8 on NBC

“The Vampire Diaries”

ThursdayOct. 8

8 on CW

“The Voice”

MondaySept. 21

8 on NBC

“The Walking Dead”

SundayOct. 11

9 on AMC

“World’s Funniest”

FridayNov. 6

8 on Fox

“You’re The Worst”

WednesdaySept. 9

10:30 on FXX

“Z Nation”

FridaySept. 11

10 on Syfy

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